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  • Bob Ferguson

    Was just reading a couple of articles that mentioned Bob "Death To All Flying Things" Ferguson ... I was curious what kind of player would likely have this nick name..Anybody got any info on him??

    Thx
    brooklynboy
    North of the Big Apple but missing Central Fla :atthepc

  • #2
    This is what baseballlibrary.com has on him:

    "One of the most outstanding and influential ballplayers of the 19th century, Ferguson first attracted national attention in 1870 when, as captain of the Brooklyn Atlantics, he drove in the tying run and scored the winning run as the Atlantics handed the Cincinnati Red Stockings their first loss in two years. An outstanding leader, he managed every team he played for from 1871 through 1884. Baseball's first switch-hitter, he was only ordinary with the bat but was considered an outstanding fielder (although the quaint nickname Death to Flying Things, signifying stellar play on fly balls, was first given to Atlantics teammate Jack Chapman). Ferguson's primary contribution to baseball was his forthright character and unquestioned honesty in a time when many baseball players had low morals and were often the pawns of gamblers. In 1872 he was elected president of the National Association of Professional Baseball Players and held that position for several years, leading the fight for honest baseball that resulted in the establishment of the National League in 1876. Quick-tempered and hot-headed, he became an umpire in his later years, and once broke a player's arm with a bat to finish an argument. "
    Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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    • #3
      found this in my files:

      In a game between Baltimore and New York in 1873 in the National Association umpire Bob Ferguson took exception to the comments of the Mutuals catcher and broke his arm in two places with a bat. Such were the perils of playing professional ball in a rough era. Funny thing is Ferguson was the league president, as well as, a player.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bkmckenna
        found this in my files:

        In a game between Baltimore and New York in 1873 in the National Association umpire Bob Ferguson took exception to the comments of the Mutuals catcher and broke his arm in two places with a bat. Such were the perils of playing professional ball in a rough era. Funny thing is Ferguson was the league president, as well as, a player.
        Thx to KCGHOST and bkmckenna for the info...He sounds like an interesting man, to say the least....
        North of the Big Apple but missing Central Fla :atthepc

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bkmckenna
          found this in my files:

          In a game between Baltimore and New York in 1873 in the National Association umpire Bob Ferguson took exception to the comments of the Mutuals catcher and broke his arm in two places with a bat. Such were the perils of playing professional ball in a rough era. Funny thing is Ferguson was the league president, as well as, a player.
          Yeah! -- player, manager, umpire, and league president. According to one author, Nat Hicks, the catcher whose arm was broken, was accused by Ferguson of having thrown the game in question. Hicks "snarled" back and Ferguson grabbed a bat. However, I believe Bobhttp://www.baseball-almanac.com/play...hp?p=wrighha01 was on the same page as Harry Wright in wanting honesty on the field. Harry was simply more civilized.

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          • #6
            According to Henry Chadwick, Ferguson was the premier 3B during the 1860's and 1870's, I thought I had read somewhere that before players used gloves that it was easier to catch a fly ball than to field a ground ball. Bob had gotten his nickname because of his handiness of catching anything in the air around third base but it is said that he also had a good arm.

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            • #7
              The last comment was my understanding at how he received his nickname "Death to flying things".

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