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  • #16
    Originally posted by Gashouse6
    It doesn't matter how many games or where it was played. Those are some pretty good stats. In a real major league ballpark and in 162 games, I can imagine that .629 AVE. would shrink.
    Good point. But remember the ball was dead. Also, despite the fact that much information has been uncovered over the years, we still can't be sure about the size of some those old ballparks. In any case, his marks show how incredibly great he was against his contemporaries. I doubt, however, he could hit anywhere close to his old numbers, and then there's the question of fielding. How do you compare a gloveless fielder with today. He must have been quite an idol. Kids used to say "I'd rather be Wright than president."

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    • #17
      the big thing is fielding - what was or wasn't called an error - of course everything begins in the pitcher's hand - then the bat - but my guess is it conversion in the field that determined many early games - what do you think about that point?

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      • #18
        I think everything is relative. Errors in the early days probably contributed more to run production than presently. But since all teams benefited from all those errors and the runs they produced, or what constituted errors, no team would have an advantage, unless, of course, they had a George Wright or Roscoe Barnes.

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        • #19
          i wasn't saying that there was an advantage for team a over team b - just that errors played a significant role in scoring

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          • #20
            I knew what you were saying. I just didn't respond very well, in fact I got off on a tangent. But yes I agree that errors played a significant roll in scoring.

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