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What team does this cap belong to?

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  • Dodgerfan1
    replied
    Originally posted by docsilvereagle View Post
    I am almost positive it is the Louisville Eclipse, National League, 1876 - 1877
    This cap appears to be much too sturdy to have been worn in the 19th century. From what I have read, those caps were much 'floppier' than their more modern counterparts. They were made in such a way as to make it easy to slip into a player's back pocket. This cap is standing up on its own. It seems to me that if this were a 19th century cap, it would be much more worn, faded and/or.... well, floppy.

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  • docsilvereagle
    replied
    I am almost positive it is the Louisville Eclipse, National League, 1876 - 1877

    Leave a comment:


  • Nashvol
    replied
    What team does this cap belong to?

    Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
    That a little league team, too? :choke:
    Here's where I was going with this: the question about this cap was placed in the "19th Century Baseball" topic. There is no way that this is a cap from that time period. New Era began in 1920, and when they started up it is uncertain whether they even produced baseball caps until just a little bit later. I believe New Era only began labeling their baseball cap products in 1954 (first with the Brooklyn Dodgers) as prior to that would produce caps for Wilson, Rawlings, etc.

    More can be learned in identifying this cap (or at least weeding out the possibilities) if there was a little more detail: where is the person who owned the cap from? what type of sweatband is inside (cloth, vinyl, leather)? is the undervisor green or grey? are there any additional identifying marks on the cap? are the eyelets metal or sewn (the image appears to show sewn eyelets)? is the closure on the cap adjustable (elastic, plastic tab, etc.), or fitted?

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by Kentucky Bomber View Post
    Just to confirm what New Era already told you, I checked the Cooperstown Ballcap Co. catalog, which documents virtually every known cap, and the 1941 Louisville Colonels cap matches exactly.
    That a little league team, too? :choke:

    Leave a comment:


  • AutographCollector
    replied
    Originally posted by Kentucky Bomber View Post
    Just to confirm what New Era already told you, I checked the Cooperstown Ballcap Co. catalog, which documents virtually every known cap, and the 1941 Louisville Colonels cap matches exactly.
    Awesome! I'm sure that the thread starter will be relieved to read that!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kentucky Bomber
    replied
    Just to confirm what New Era already told you, I checked the Cooperstown Ballcap Co. catalog, which documents virtually every known cap, and the 1941 Louisville Colonels cap matches exactly.

    Leave a comment:


  • AutographCollector
    replied
    Regardless what league it is. Wouldn't New Era still know?

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  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by Nashvol View Post
    I'm surprised there's any fuss about this cap. There is nothing that tells that this is a minor league cap. It could be a youth league or high school cap for all we know. As late as the early 70s New Era produced caps like this. The image appears to show 6 rows of visor stitching. That signifies a lower quality cap, as 8 rows of stitching on the visor translates to the use of a better visor board. Check your latest MLB Onfield cap, it has 8 rows of stitching. Another attribute that is misleading is the felt lettering. New Era stopped using felt lettering in the 80s or early 90s when swiss embroidery became so popular and the lettering style of choice.
    That's actually what I was thinking. Little league, probably.

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  • Nashvol
    replied
    I'm surprised there's any fuss about this cap. There is nothing that tells that this is a minor league cap. It could be a youth league or high school cap for all we know. As late as the early 70s New Era produced caps like this. The image appears to show 6 rows of visor stitching. That signifies a lower quality cap, as 8 rows of stitching on the visor translates to the use of a better visor board. Check your latest MLB Onfield cap, it has 8 rows of stitching. Another attribute that is misleading is the felt lettering. New Era stopped using felt lettering in the 80s or early 90s when swiss embroidery became so popular and the lettering style of choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • AutographCollector
    replied
    Ok, I cheated. I e-mailed New Era Cap. And this is the conversation:
    Tony,

    The closest match to a minor league team is the Louisville Colonels, early 1940s, but definitely 1941.

    The Negro League New York Lincoln Giants wore something similar back in the late 1920s, but the ‘L’ was not plain block but more of a fancy block letter.

    Of course, it could also be a high school/college cap, too. We’d really need to know the location of your friend obtained the hat or if who he got played for a certain team/league.

    Sincerely,

    Brian | Web Consumer Relations
    New Era Cap Co. | 160 Delaware Ave | Buffalo, NY 14202-2404
    P: 1-877-NEC-5950 Ext. 1556 | W: www.neweracap.com
    ***Selected New Era Apparel now on sale at www.neweracap.com!

    From: Anthony [mailto:**********@yahoo.com]
    Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2008 9:59 AM
    To: Web Service
    Subject: Question about a hat

    Hello,
    I have attached a photo of a hat that a few online buddies of mine are curious about. It is red in color with the letter L on the front. The inside label says "New Era". Do you know which team that this is?
    Thank you so much,
    Tony
    Now all we need to know is... where exactly did you get this hat? Was it given to you? Did you purchase it? Let me know, and I will call Brian myself and tell him. Because now you guys got me curious.

    Leave a comment:


  • rrhersh
    replied
    I am skeptical of its even being a replica (or at least an accurate one) of anything 19th century. The shape of the bill is modern. The ventilation holes have already been noted. We can at the machine stitching, especially on the bill. I do not claim expertise on 19th century baseball cap designs, but I have seen my share of contemporary pictures and this simply doesn't say "19th century" to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Pere
    replied
    Originally posted by Buzzaldrin View Post
    Who knows when caps started having ventilation holes?
    Originally posted by TonyK View Post
    New Era Cap Company wasn't founded until 1920. This may be a minor league cap?
    I guess I was answering with the idea that it was a "replica" of some sort.

    But yes, if this is an original, it wouldn't be in the 19th Century.
    Last edited by Pere; 05-20-2008, 06:32 PM.

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  • TonyK
    replied
    New Era Cap Company wasn't founded until 1920. This may be a minor league cap?

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  • Buzzaldrin
    replied
    Who knows when caps started having ventilation holes?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian McKenna
    replied
    The "L" is much too plain for 1870s major leagues.

    Leave a comment:

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