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1884 Home Runs

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  • 1884 Home Runs

    In 1884 there seemed to be alot of home runs, more than normal for that time. There were 4 players with 20+ homers. Ned Williamson had 27 homers that year, His career high up until then was 3. Was there some type of rule change that year that allowed this many home runs or was it just a strange break out of round trippers?
    go sox.

    Pigskin-Fever

  • #2
    25 of williamson's 27 home runs were at home - it was only 180 feet to the left field wall at lake front park ii in 1884 and 196 to right - lake front was around 2 years - in 1883 a ball hit over the short left field porch was a double but it was a homer in 1884

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    • #3
      Ned had 3 HR's in 1 game in 1884
      "There are three things in my life which I really love: God, my family, and baseball. The only problem - once baseball season starts, I change the order around a bit.
      ~~Al Gallagher


      God Bless America!

      Click here to see my baseball tribute site!

      Click here to see the best pitcher NOT in the HOF!

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      • #4
        Great article on the topic...
        http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...williamson.htm
        WAMCO!

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        • #5
          I found a drawing of Lake Front II and it looks very uneven.

          go sox.

          Pigskin-Fever

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bkmckenna
            25 of williamson's 27 home runs were at home - it was only 180 feet to the left field wall at lake front park ii in 1884 and 196 to right - lake front was around 2 years - in 1883 a ball hit over the short left field porch was a double but it was a homer in 1884
            My Little League park when I was 12 was 200 ft all around. I can only imagine MLB players taking aim from 180 ft.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by flash143817
              My Little League park when I was 12 was 200 ft all around. I can only imagine MLB players taking aim from 180 ft.
              You're right but it was a different time in baseball history. The ball was softer and didn't fly like it does today. The home run was not as valued as it is today. Pitchers were throwing from around 50 feet. Different time, different era, a little different game.

              The ball itself makes a huge difference. I've played softball with a wide variety of balls and I can tell you it makes a big difference, virtually day and night what you power capabilities are.
              Last edited by Brian McKenna; 07-15-2006, 08:25 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RedSoxVT92
                I found a drawing of Lake Front II and it looks very uneven.

                If this drawing is accurate then I imagine the breeze off of the lake might have helped some of Ned Williamson's hits to LF.
                "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RedSoxVT92
                  I found a drawing of Lake Front II and it looks very uneven.

                  Man, I think I would have no problems in that park, even with a wiffle-ball.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TonyK
                    If this drawing is accurate then I imagine the breeze off of the lake might have helped some of Ned Williamson's hits to LF.

                    180ft down the Line and you credit a slight breeze helping the ball carry!

                    I think it could be the extremely short porch helping his power #'s.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Comm
                      180ft down the Line and you credit a slight breeze helping the ball carry!

                      I think it could be the extremely short porch helping his power #'s.
                      The breeze "might have helped" is what I wrote. I live near a Great Lake and the Finger Lakes, and the strong winds coming off them at more than 30 MPH would help a lot of fly balls.

                      The short distance to the foul poles is obvious even to a Little Leaguer.
                      "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                      "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RedSoxVT92
                        I found a drawing of Lake Front II and it looks very uneven.

                        How is it possible to hit a ball so far????

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