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Was the NA (1871-75) a "Major" League?

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  • #76
    Originally posted by TonyK View Post
    Nobody got this?
    Los Angeles... or California.... or Anaheim.... OR.... Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim...! God knows whats coming next.... ( I saw it the other day and didnt comment but did think it was clever )

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    • #77
      Originally posted by Calif_Eagle View Post
      Los Angeles... or California.... or Anaheim.... OR.... Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim...! God knows whats coming next.... ( I saw it the other day and didnt comment but did think it was clever )
      Your team has had more name changes than Elizabeth Taylor. It has to be a marketing ploy to get fans to buy new gear every four or five years.
      "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
      "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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      • #78
        Speaking of "major" leagues, Harry Wright in his 1894 will, stated he was leaving his papers to the two major leagues and their successors. It's a mystery since the only recognized major league at the time was the NL.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by SABR Steve View Post
          Speaking of "major" leagues, Harry Wright in his 1894 will, stated he was leaving his papers to the two major leagues and their successors. It's a mystery since the only recognized major league at the time was the NL.
          Maybe he saw great things in the future of the Western League.

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          • #80
            Base on my readings, I totally regard the NA as a major league. The best players; the Ansons, Spaldings, Jones's and Matthew's were part of that league and IMO makes it a major. Even with all the NA faults such as gambling, teams dissapearing after 12 games, jumping, unstable scheduling and so on, the quality of play was better in the NA than anywhere else in the US.
            You better cut the pizza in 4 pieces, I'm not hungry enough to eat six.

            -Yogi Berra

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            • #81
              The National Association was more of a major league than the UA or PL ... come on, those only lasted one year, how are they major leagues? At least the National Association set up the basis for the National League if anything.

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              • #82
                Originally posted by SABR Steve View Post
                Speaking of "major" leagues, Harry Wright in his 1894 will, stated he was leaving his papers to the two major leagues and their successors. It's a mystery since the only recognized major league at the time was the NL.
                But it wasn't the National League- it was called the National League and American Assocoation of professional baseball after the merger; they comnoned names. That's unwieldy, so people just called it the National League, but if you look at newspapers from the early 1890s, they say "League Association" when referring to it. Actually, this brings up a question- was it ever officially shortened to just the National League, or is it still officially the whole shebang?
                "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by WolfSpear View Post
                  The National Association was more of a major league than the UA or PL ... come on, those only lasted one year, how are they major leagues? At least the National Association set up the basis for the National League if anything.
                  The PL lasted one year because of financial issues, but it was stronger than the NL and the AA on the field and at the box office- length of service does not determine the status of major or minor.

                  I agree with you about the UA, the only problem is that it was recognized as major at the time- Henry Lucas was the most talked about man in American in 1884 for starting the UA. You don't get that kind of recognition for starting a minor league. Kind of hard where to go with this one- it did indeed suck in quality of play, but the other leagues recognized the challenge as legit (although they were very clear to put it down as inferior). They blacklisted players that jumped there- if it was a minor league, what would be the point of that? They would only come back since major leagues "should" have more money.
                  "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

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