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Unbelievable Little League Story.

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  • #16
    True Story:

    In Brooklyn, New York, Chush is a school that caters
    to learning-disabled children. Some children remain in
    Chush for their entire school career, while others can
    be mainstreamed into conventional school. At a Chush
    fundraiser dinner, the father of a Chush child
    delivered a speech that would never be forgotten by
    all who attended. After praising the school and its
    dedicated staff, he cried out, "Where is the
    perfection in my son, Shaya" Everything God does is
    done with perfection. But my child cannot understand
    things as other children do. My child cannot remember
    facts and figures as other children do. Where is God's
    perfection?" The audience was shocked by the question,
    pained by the father's anguish, and stilled by the
    piercing query. "I believe," the father answered,
    "that when God brings a child like this into the
    world, the perfection that he seeks is in the way
    people react to this child."

    He then told the following story about his son, Shaya.

    One afternoon, Shaya and his father walked past a park
    where some boys Shaya knew were playing baseball.
    Shaya asked, "Do you think they'll let me play?"
    Shaya's father knew that his son was not at all
    athletic and that most boys would not want him on
    their team. But Shaya's father understood that if his
    son was chosen to play, it would give him a sense of
    belonging. Shaya's father approached one of the boys
    on the field and asked if Shaya could play. The boy
    looked around for guidance from his teammates. Getting
    none, he took matters into his own hands and said,
    "We're losing by six runs, and the game is in the
    eighth inning. I guess he can be on our team, and
    we'll try to put him up in the ninth inning."

    Shaya's father was ecstatic as Shaya smiled broadly.
    Shaya was told to put on a glove and go out to play in
    center field. In the bottom of the eighth inning,
    Shaya's team scored a few runs but was still behind by
    three. In the bottom of the ninth inning, Shaya's team
    scored again, and now had two outs and the bases
    loaded, with the potential winning run on base. Shaya
    was scheduled to be up. Would the team actually let
    Shaya bat at this juncture and give away their chance
    to win the game?

    Surprisingly, Shaya was given the bat. Everyone knew
    that it was all but impossible because Shaya didn't
    even know how to hold the bat, let alone hit with it.
    However, as Shaya stepped up to the plate, the pitcher
    moved a few steps to lob the ball in softly so Shaya
    could at least be able to make contact. The first
    pitch came in, and Shaya swung clumsily and missed.
    One of Shaya's teammates came up to Shaya, and
    together they held the bat and faced the pitcher
    waiting for the next pitch. The pitcher again took a
    few steps forward to toss the ball softly toward
    Shaya. As the pitcher came in, Shaya and his teammate
    swung the bat, and together they hit a slow ground
    ball to the pitcher. The pitcher picked up the soft
    grounder and could easily have thrown the ball to the
    first baseman. Shaya would have been out and that
    would have ended the game. Instead, the pitcher took
    the ball and threw it on a high arc to right field far
    beyond the reach of the first baseman. Everyone
    started yelling, "Shaya, run to first. Run to first."
    Never in his life had Shaya run to first. He scampered
    down the baseline wide-eyed and startled. By the time
    he reached first base, the right fielder had the ball.
    He could have thrown the ball to the second baseman
    who would tag out Shaya, who was still running!!

    But the right field understood what the pitcher's
    intentions were, so he threw the ball high and far
    over the third baseman's head. Everyone yelled, "Run
    to second, run to second!" Shaya ran toward second
    base as the runners ahead of him deliriously circled
    the bases toward home. As Shaya reached second base,
    the opposing shortstop turned him in the direction of
    third base, and shouted, "Run to third." As Shaya
    rounded third, the boys from both teams ran behind him
    screaming, "Shaya, run home." Shaya ran home, stepped
    on home plate, and all 18 boys lifted him on their
    shoulders and made him the hero, as he had just hit a
    'grand slam' and won the game for his team.

    "That day," said the father softly with tears now
    rolling down his face, "those 18 boys reached their
    level of God's perfection".

    ----------------

    It seems to me that Little League's first priority should be to build character, not win at all cost.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by ESPNFan
      Trying to treat a disabled child normaly is one thing. Don't you think taking advantage of obvious disability to secure victory is something else entirely?
      Well, I liked the attitude of the sickly kid. Instead of pouting about it he went to work trying to improve his hitting so that one day he might be the guy that gets walked. The kid "gets it"! And the parents do not.

      By the way, the next morning, Romney woke up and decided to do something about what happened to him.

      "I'm going to work on my batting," he told his dad. "Then maybe someday I'll be the one they walk."
      Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 08-09-2006, 02:56 PM.
      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by ESPNFan
        Just my opinion but I was never in a "competative" league where there was a cap on runs scored during an inning. Also there probably isnt much thought given to "baseball stratagey" in the league if batting a sickly child is your idea of giving protection to your teams best hitter. And I don't know about any of you guys experienced it but I can't remember a Intentional walk given to anyone until I hit Babe Ruth League.
        Different organizations and different age groups have different rules. In our LL, we don't even keep standings until the 'majors' level, which is predominantly 11-12 year olds. I never even played in a dad's pitch league growing up. Our Pee Wee division was kid's pitch, period. It's not that way any longer.

        All I'm saying here is we're supposed to judge a coach or coaching staff by an article written to tug on our hearts and get a lot of hits on the 'net. We don't know the whole story. What happened during the rest of the season when this kid took the field or came to bat?

        If a kid like this signed up for our league, I can tell you that we would try and hash out the situation BEFORE he ever took the field. And we might ultimately have to make the decision that he simply could not play in the majors level because there was too much risk of him getting hurt. The fact the town is split over this incident, according to the story, suggests to me that there's a whole lot more to this story than one dadgum at bat.
        Never confuse character with geography --- Red Smith
        Astros Daily

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Elvis
          True Story:

          In Brooklyn, New York, Chush is a school that caters
          to learning-disabled children. Some children remain in
          Chush for their entire school career, while others can
          be mainstreamed into conventional school. At a Chush
          fundraiser dinner, the father of a Chush child
          delivered a speech that would never be forgotten by
          all who attended. After praising the school and its
          dedicated staff, he cried out, "Where is the
          perfection in my son, Shaya" Everything God does is
          done with perfection. But my child cannot understand
          things as other children do. My child cannot remember
          facts and figures as other children do. Where is God's
          perfection?" The audience was shocked by the question,
          pained by the father's anguish, and stilled by the
          piercing query. "I believe," the father answered,
          "that when God brings a child like this into the
          world, the perfection that he seeks is in the way
          people react to this child."

          He then told the following story about his son, Shaya.

          One afternoon, Shaya and his father walked past a park
          where some boys Shaya knew were playing baseball.
          Shaya asked, "Do you think they'll let me play?"
          Shaya's father knew that his son was not at all
          athletic and that most boys would not want him on
          their team. But Shaya's father understood that if his
          son was chosen to play, it would give him a sense of
          belonging. Shaya's father approached one of the boys
          on the field and asked if Shaya could play. The boy
          looked around for guidance from his teammates. Getting
          none, he took matters into his own hands and said,
          "We're losing by six runs, and the game is in the
          eighth inning. I guess he can be on our team, and
          we'll try to put him up in the ninth inning."

          Shaya's father was ecstatic as Shaya smiled broadly.
          Shaya was told to put on a glove and go out to play in
          center field. In the bottom of the eighth inning,
          Shaya's team scored a few runs but was still behind by
          three. In the bottom of the ninth inning, Shaya's team
          scored again, and now had two outs and the bases
          loaded, with the potential winning run on base. Shaya
          was scheduled to be up. Would the team actually let
          Shaya bat at this juncture and give away their chance
          to win the game?

          Surprisingly, Shaya was given the bat. Everyone knew
          that it was all but impossible because Shaya didn't
          even know how to hold the bat, let alone hit with it.
          However, as Shaya stepped up to the plate, the pitcher
          moved a few steps to lob the ball in softly so Shaya
          could at least be able to make contact. The first
          pitch came in, and Shaya swung clumsily and missed.
          One of Shaya's teammates came up to Shaya, and
          together they held the bat and faced the pitcher
          waiting for the next pitch. The pitcher again took a
          few steps forward to toss the ball softly toward
          Shaya. As the pitcher came in, Shaya and his teammate
          swung the bat, and together they hit a slow ground
          ball to the pitcher. The pitcher picked up the soft
          grounder and could easily have thrown the ball to the
          first baseman. Shaya would have been out and that
          would have ended the game. Instead, the pitcher took
          the ball and threw it on a high arc to right field far
          beyond the reach of the first baseman. Everyone
          started yelling, "Shaya, run to first. Run to first."
          Never in his life had Shaya run to first. He scampered
          down the baseline wide-eyed and startled. By the time
          he reached first base, the right fielder had the ball.
          He could have thrown the ball to the second baseman
          who would tag out Shaya, who was still running!!

          But the right field understood what the pitcher's
          intentions were, so he threw the ball high and far
          over the third baseman's head. Everyone yelled, "Run
          to second, run to second!" Shaya ran toward second
          base as the runners ahead of him deliriously circled
          the bases toward home. As Shaya reached second base,
          the opposing shortstop turned him in the direction of
          third base, and shouted, "Run to third." As Shaya
          rounded third, the boys from both teams ran behind him
          screaming, "Shaya, run home." Shaya ran home, stepped
          on home plate, and all 18 boys lifted him on their
          shoulders and made him the hero, as he had just hit a
          'grand slam' and won the game for his team.

          "That day," said the father softly with tears now
          rolling down his face, "those 18 boys reached their
          level of God's perfection".

          ----------------

          It seems to me that Little League's first priority should be to build character, not win at all cost.
          Great story.
          Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

          Comment


          • #20
            Great story, Elvis.

            I think between that story and the one in ESPN, the moral of the story is obvious...adults suck.

            I think organized sports are awful. When I was a kid (and I'm only 30), I played sandlot ball..and everyone played, everyone hit, and even when problems arose, we found ways around it to keep the game going.
            Visit my card site at Mike D's Baseball Card Page.

            Comment


            • #21
              Pretty sad, I do not remember EVER seeing an intentional walk when I played little league

              Comment


              • #22
                Late to the party, but I don't the blame the coach. The kids parents probably wanted their son to have as normal a childhood as he could. Situations like these where it is possible to fail are normal for children. You can't put your kid out there in normal society and want everybody to treat him the same only when it favors your kid. Sometimes being treated normally is going to go against your child. That is life, you can yell and complain and treat your kid like a victim and those conspiring against him as the villains but that won't do any good for your child nor will it help him grow up to be a well adjusted adult. It appears that Romney did what I would hope someone in his position would do which is work harder to become better. Which if this hadn't happened, if they had given him special treatment, he would have less desire to improve himself. The actions of those who wish to protect him from hurtful feelings would have been doing him a disservice.

                Comment


                • #23
                  To those who seem to think the coaches are in the right here...you really think coaches should be calling for intentional walks in little league games so they can win games?

                  Why? Wouldn't it be better for the pitcher to pitch to the big hitter, and either win or lose based on his abilities? Isn't it better for the big hitter to do the same? Whatever happened, the players woudn't have been crushed, and they'd have won or lost on their own merit, not on the workings of some coach who thinks he's Tony LaRussa or something.

                  I think the less adults have to do with kids playing (other than making sure they're safe), the better.
                  Visit my card site at Mike D's Baseball Card Page.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    This coach is a peice of trash. Strategy my ass. They're kids. I hope his wife bitches at him non stop for a year(like I have to hope).

                    All this tough love talk is ridiculous. They have the rest of their lives to be treated like dirt in the real world, let them feel ok about themselves for 15 minutes when they're 10.


                    Does anyone think if the "best hitter" had been pitched too and won the game, that a 10 year old would second guess the coach about an intentional walk? IBBs don't happen in little league anyway. And if the kids were upset, they'll get over it and learn a lesson.


                    When I was 10ish and in little league, I hated to lose too. Hell, I hated games ending in a tie.
                    But then I grew up.

                    If you want to take a competetive approach to life, fine. But that doesn't mean you have to take that attitude into a game. Especially into one where your job is to teach impressionable children. If this coach is such a great strategist, let Jim Leyland step aside and he can take over a major league team and see how much Confusious here can teach us.

                    Treating someone who isn't as fortunate as you differently and-god forbid-helping them out isn't a sign of weakness, it's a sign of human decency-something this world and this culture severely lacks.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mike D.
                      To those who seem to think the coaches are in the right here...you really think coaches should be calling for intentional walks in little league games so they can win games?

                      Why? Wouldn't it be better for the pitcher to pitch to the big hitter, and either win or lose based on his abilities? Isn't it better for the big hitter to do the same? Whatever happened, the players woudn't have been crushed, and they'd have won or lost on their own merit, not on the workings of some coach who thinks he's Tony LaRussa or something.

                      I think the less adults have to do with kids playing (other than making sure they're safe), the better.
                      The goal is to win, in any game.... while I think it is sad he walked him, it was, indeed, smart if you want to win...

                      I agree with Ubiquitos 100%, the way to avoid this happening dont let the kid play, if he wants to play you have to expect things like this

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Mike D.
                        When I was a kid (and I'm only 30), I played sandlot ball..and everyone played, everyone hit, and even when problems arose, we found ways around it to keep the game going.
                        I'd been thinking almost exactly the same words as I'd been reading through some of the horror stories on the baseball fundamentals forum. There were two great things about sandlot ball: the one I appreciated at the time was that all day there weren't any grown-ups around. The one I appreciate now is that we had to choose up sides--sometimes with an odd number of players--decide disputed calls, when to quit and start over with new teams, all by ourselves. We all played very competitively, and some of us didn't even like one another very much, but as you say, we had to keep the game going, so we had our own conventions and intuitions about what was fair and not, and we relied on them. Never got much good as a ballplayer, but learned a lot about life.
                        Last edited by Sliding Billy; 08-09-2006, 03:44 PM.
                        The ball once struck off,
                        Away flies the boy
                        To the next destin'd post,
                        And then home with joy.
                        --Anonymous, 1744

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Mike D.
                          To those who seem to think the coaches are in the right here...you really think coaches should be calling for intentional walks in little league games so they can win games?
                          Then's what the point of playing a championship game which this was?

                          Why? Wouldn't it be better for the pitcher to pitch to the big hitter, and either win or lose based on his abilities? Isn't it better for the big hitter to do the same? Whatever happened, the players woudn't have been crushed, and they'd have won or lost on their own merit, not on the workings of some coach who thinks he's Tony LaRussa or something.
                          How about the kids who won? People keep accusing the coaches of trying to win "for themselves". What, the coach's team didn't deserve to win. Didi those kids work hard all summer to get to this point? Shouldn't the coach do all he can to help his kids do the best they can?

                          I think the less adults have to do with kids playing (other than making sure they're safe), the better.
                          I can agree with that.
                          Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Why are the adults so much more upset by this than the cancer kid? These adults should take a lesson from him. He's not pouting or giving interviews trashing the opposing coach for walking the other hitter to get to him. He took it in stide. Imagine that. He's not going to carry this stigma for the rest of his life. It's the upset adults that need to grow up.
                            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
                              Why are the adults so much more upset by this than the cancer kid? These adults should take a lesson from him. He's not pouting or giving interviews trashing the opposing coach for walking the other hitter to get to him. He took it in stide. Imagine that. He's not going to carry this stigma for the rest of his life. It's the upset adults that need to grow up.
                              Because people think they have a right to get upset over anything.... even tho they do not

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Mike D.
                                The line "I'd have done the same thing. It's just good baseball strategy" is very telling.

                                Does anyone else find it wrong that when we're talking about 9 and 10 year olds, that "baseball strategy" comes into play at all?

                                If you're a coach of little kids, and you're playing to win, you should go buy a copy of MLB 2006 for Playstation, and leave little kids alone. It's not about you and your manager fantasy, it's about the kids having fun.

                                Ugh...disgusts me.
                                My thoughts exactly

                                Your are not a 'manager' in little league, you are a mentor to teach the game and get kids off of their vide games and learn the greatest game ever invented

                                No one should have an intentional walk in little league

                                and the kid with cancer SOBBED himself to sleep that night....that is ok with you??????

                                As for the kids

                                I don't recall one win, lose or tie in little league

                                I remember after the game, we got a free snowcone
                                Last edited by Imapotato; 08-09-2006, 04:59 PM.

                                Comment

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