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Little League game that was won on a forfeit.

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  • #16
    Did you also read the section on mandatory play? If you did you would realize that they should have completed this task by the fourth inning in order to comply in any situation. While reading the pool play rules did you notice that a team cannot intentionally try to manipulate the score so as not to affect the tie breaker situations?
    You have to piss with the puppies before you can bark with the dogs. - SFC Norman Dutram, Company B, 242d Combat Engineers

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    • #17
      Originally posted by cartersball
      Did you also read the section on mandatory play? If you did you would realize that they should have completed this task by the fourth inning in order to comply in any situation. While reading the pool play rules did you notice that a team cannot intentionally try to manipulate the score so as not to affect the tie breaker situations?
      I understand the participation rule. There is nowhere that says he has to play by the 4th inning. And if the New Hampshire team had actually tried to win, the Vermont kid would have gotten his rightful AB in the bottom of the inning. Instead they chose to win on a technicality by trying to lose, which supposedly was against Little League rules according to a rule posted by another poster. Unfortunately the umpire decided that he was Moral Police and put the game on his shoulders. I will definitely not root for them at all in this LLWS because of that.


      What does the pool play tiebreaker have to do with the participation rule?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by cartersball
        Okay, maybe the kid knew his role. I am sure he's going to stand up and tell his coach what to do aren't you. BS!! You can't fault a kid here. They are twelve, not twenty. From experience I can tell you that whoever was scoring the game for Vermont had no access to the manager, coach, or kids. The only person who knew what was going on was the Official Scorekeeper, and since when is it thier job to tell a team they are violating a rule.
        I'm not faulting the kid, merely pointing out what he must have been thinking. Kids who make the All Stars LOVE to bat! That's one reason why they made the All Stars. They also want to know when they get up to bat and who they bat after.

        No, the kid is going to walk over to one of the coaches and tell them that there are 7 more kids who have to bat before he can.

        As far as the scorer for Vermont, they would be given the batting order plus the names and numbers of the three subs. They would also be given the other teams batting order plus subs as well. It is up to them where they want to sit. No matter where they sat, a coach can easily go over to them between innings and find out if everybody batted and went in for three outs or not. They would also want to know if the other team had gotten their subs in.

        Have you ever scored a LL AS game?

        Did you know that as the scorer for your team you have to report all changes to the Official Scorer? That meant that somebody from the Vermont team walked over to the Official Scorer and told them that this kid was replacing another player. While walking over to the Official Scorer, how difficult is it for them to check the batting order and notice that there is no way this kid is going to bat unless the other team rallies and at least ties the game in the top of the 6th inning? They should have stopped, turned around, and gone back and told one of the coaches what the problem was.

        This ain't rocket science.
        Last edited by TonyK; 08-22-2006, 10:50 PM.
        "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
        "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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