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  • New Bat for 13yr old

    my 13 yr old is looking for a new bat for babe ruth in minnesota. he is a good contact hitter. not very big, but consistently drives the ball and has good bat speed. he's 5, 3 and 115 lbs. he's liked his stealths and vexxums. whats a good bat for him this year? Please tell me what you think.
    Last edited by baddad; 02-15-2008, 11:49 AM.

  • #2
    I think you should buy him a wood bat. He will learn to hit the right way.

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    • #3
      He has a wood bat that he uses in the cages. What bat would be good for him in games? He is an advanced player.

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      • #4
        If he's an advanced player in 13U he should be swinging a -3. He's two years from high school.

        There are a lot of good bats. But they are balanced differently. My son and a friend/travel teammate are both good hitters. They don't care for each other's bats. One swings a Stealth. One swings an EXO. They're very different. You son is going to have to be the one who decides on a bat.

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        • #5
          I agree that he should be swinging a -3. But, he is a small kid and only 13, so maybe you would want to look into getting a -5 bat this year and when he grows some more then buy a -3. Your son is also going to have to swing the bats for himself to decide which one to get.
          "I'd walk through hell in a gasoline suit to play baseball." - Pete Rose

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TG Coach View Post
            If he's an advanced player in 13U he should be swinging a -3. He's two years from high school.

            There are a lot of good bats. But they are balanced differently. My son and a friend/travel teammate are both good hitters. They don't care for each other's bats. One swings a Stealth. One swings an EXO. They're very different. You son is going to have to be the one who decides on a bat.

            Agreed. Your son should politely ask a few teammates if he might swing their bats to see what he likes; then, sink an exorbitant amount of money into buying him a new one. Many of the youth and HS players I coach are in the same boat as the aforementioned players - they love their own stick and won't even consider using their teammates'.
            And IMHO, hitting with a wood bat does no more to build proper hitting mechanics than does wearing batting gloves or a particular brand of shoe. Too many coaches feel that wood bats will reinforce good mechanics - repetition of good mechanics reinforces good mechanics. Hitting a wood bat, with poor mechanics, won't allow you to improve just because you're hitting with wood. It will allow you to buy a new wood bat after your son has battered his previous one while using poor mechanics. If your son progresses through baseball, the time will come soon enough when he may have the opportunity to hit with wood. Until then, buy him what he likes to swing that you can afford and keep working.
            "I became a good pitcher when I stopped trying to make them miss the ball and started trying to make them hit it." - Sandy Koufax.

            "My name is Yasiel Puig. I am from Cuba. I am 21 years old. Thank you."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bhss89 View Post
              Agreed. Your son should politely ask a few teammates if he might swing their bats to see what he likes; then, sink an exorbitant amount of money into buying him a new one. Many of the youth and HS players I coach are in the same boat as the aforementioned players - they love their own stick and won't even consider using their teammates'.
              And IMHO, hitting with a wood bat does no more to build proper hitting mechanics than does wearing batting gloves or a particular brand of shoe. Too many coaches feel that wood bats will reinforce good mechanics - repetition of good mechanics reinforces good mechanics. Hitting a wood bat, with poor mechanics, won't allow you to improve just because you're hitting with wood. It will allow you to buy a new wood bat after your son has battered his previous one while using poor mechanics. If your son progresses through baseball, the time will come soon enough when he may have the opportunity to hit with wood. Until then, buy him what he likes to swing that you can afford and keep working.
              I like this idea. I did this all the time and I would give bats test runs. I tried out the rawlings Rush today and it was pretty nice. Unlike the Stealths, when you do get jammed, A) there is hardly any sting and B) the ball actually moves.

              I say wait until 8th grade until getting the -3.

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              • #8
                Agreed on waiting for the -3; in most cases, I feel it is beneficial for youth players to swing the lightest bat that is allowed in their age group. Too heavy and a young player is asking for bat drag issues to arise.
                Also, please keep in mind that any player borrowing a bat should always ask permission. This goes unsaid much of the time, and I believe that most teammates won't mind, but with new bats going for $250+ in this day and age, it's always best to ask first!
                "I became a good pitcher when I stopped trying to make them miss the ball and started trying to make them hit it." - Sandy Koufax.

                "My name is Yasiel Puig. I am from Cuba. I am 21 years old. Thank you."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Food for thought

                  “Selecting the right bat for the youth player is a process that involves more than a simple consideration of the player’s height and weight. The child’s strength, eye/hand coordination and the amount of fundamental baseball training they have received are key elements in bat selection. When choosing a bat you should consider the foundational approach, or simple philosophy, to hitting that will be built on as the player improves and advances through the ranks. All paths lead to heavier bats. High school and college rules allow a maximum of only -3 ounces. It may seem ridiculous to consider high school and college rules when your child is only 8 or 9 years old but learning to hit is a “pay me now or pay me later” proposition. The question becomes whether to teach the younger player the proper mechanics to generate good bat speed with a slightly heavier bat or buy a lighter bat so they can immediately get around quicker in spite of lazy hands or other mechanical deficiencies inherently common in the typical inexperienced youth player’s swing. It is important to consider the child’s commitment to the game. A mildly interested child should take advantage of the lightest bat possible to get the best performance possible with the least amount of training. The lighter bat should also be given to a child that is just beginning his or her training to allow speedy early results to encourage future commitment. But as the child’s training advances and proper mechanics are achieved, progressively heavier bats should be considered. Here is the simplest rule of thumb: swing the heaviest bat possible without lowering bat speed. For instance, if a player swings a 19 ounce bat at the same speed they swing a 17 ounce bat, use the 19. Swing several different lengths and weights to find the bat that feels right.”

                  -Anderson Bat Company

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by baddad View Post
                    my 13 yr old is looking for a new bat for babe ruth in minnesota. he is a good contact hitter. not very big, but consistently drives the ball and has good bat speed. he's 5, 3 and 115 lbs. he's liked his stealths and vexxums. whats a good bat for him this year? Please tell me what you think.
                    I'm like that, execpt 5' 11", I use an Easton Hammer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      "A mildly interested child should take advantage of the lightest bat possible to get the best performance possible with the least amount of training."

                      At 13U this is a great idea as long as it's a given the kid's time in the game is nearing an end. I can't imagine a decent hitter using a feather light bat.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by baddad View Post
                        my 13 yr old is looking for a new bat for babe ruth in minnesota. he is a good contact hitter. not very big, but consistently drives the ball and has good bat speed. he's 5, 3 and 115 lbs. he's liked his stealths and vexxums. whats a good bat for him this year? Please tell me what you think.
                        What is Babe Ruth rule for bat weight differiential at the 13 year old level? I can't find an answer at the Babe Ruth web site.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by old perfessor View Post
                          What is Babe Ruth rule for bat weight differiential at the 13 year old level? I can't find an answer at the Babe Ruth web site.

                          Got my answer by calling the Babe Ruth headquarters. According to Rob Conner, National Commissioner, "No more 2 ¾ barrel and 42 inches in length. We do not have a plus minus or drop rule."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by old perfessor View Post
                            Got my answer by calling the Babe Ruth headquarters. According to Rob Conner, National Commissioner, "No more 2 ¾ barrel and 42 inches in length. We do not have a plus minus or drop rule."
                            That's a pretty big bat for a 13 year old. What size shoes do you think he might wear?
                            Have Fun and Play Hard!

                            Chuck Faulkner
                            Tazewell TN 37879
                            The Glove Medic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My son is 11 and I have been fortunate enough to be able to get several different bats for him... That having been said he currently has or has had Easton Stealth,
                              Vexxum, Nike Torque, Omaha and Dynasty. This what he has told me:

                              Omaha - His favorite, lots of pop and very forgiving.
                              Dynasty - Essentially the same as Omaha but he prefers Omaha.
                              Nike - Balanced... says it is just ok.
                              Stealth - Good pop, not very forgiving (stings)
                              Vexxum - Hated it... says he can not feel the ball at contact.

                              Hope that helps.
                              Coop
                              Coop

                              Don't forget to swing hard, in case you hit the ball. ~Woodie Held

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