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  • Originally posted by gator92 View Post
    I don't think it is overhyped - I know it is.

    If you are willing to be convinced, first read this article -

    http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/...s/8219942.html

    The most important part is in the first paragraph:

    OVER THE FENCE in dead centerfield. Over the shrubbery and the ivy. All the way over the brick batter's eye - all 31 feet, 6 inches of it - and then into Ashburn Alley on one hop.

    "On one hop"... Very important: the ball didn't even land in Ashburn's Alley, it bounced over the wall behind the batter's eye in order to reach the Alley.

    Next, take a look at this Citizens Bank Park photo from digitalballparks.com - note the green and white "482" marker on the back wall of Ashburn's Alley. The 482 marker is accurate.

    Here's a good side view of Ashburn's Alley: Citizens Bank Park photo

    That spot is also marked on this Google Earth overhead diagram, which is marked with the landing spot of the ball and the 482 marker. You can see the impact point was about 439 feet from home plate.



    The ball would have covered several more feet if it has been allowed to return all the way back down to field level; Hit Tracker figured that to add up to 455 feet overall.

    If you can come up with a plausible explanation for how a ball that impacts 43 feet short of a 482 foot marker can be "estimated" at 505 feet, I am all ears. But I think the only explanation is "hype"...


    Edit: typo, originally typed 437 feet instead of 439 feet

    It's really not a matter of me believing it. To me, it is what it is regardless of how long it went. The issue that I have with this is that if it really is 437 feet, then they, the media/Phillies, should tell accurately tell the common person instead of giving us false information. Coming from the Phillies, I do ask myself often why doesn't it suprise me that they would be behind something like this. I've seen this act way too much from them.

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    • Originally posted by Great One View Post
      It's really not a matter of me believing it. To me, it is what it is regardless of how long it went. The issue that I have with this is that if it really is 437 feet, then they, the media/Phillies, should tell accurately tell the common person instead of giving us false information. Coming from the Phillies, I do ask myself often why doesn't it suprise me that they would be behind something like this. I've seen this act way too much from them.
      Well, the impact point was 439, the true distance was 455.

      But I agree with you, they should try to get these distances right, but I don't think they know how. They probably have a chart, given to them by someone who implicitly, if not explicitly, told them the chart is usually wrong, and they just wing it from there. This in contrast to the Red Sox, who decided some time ago (correctly) that their "system" wasn't producing accurate numbers, and they stopped announcing them. I hope they will come around some time soon...

      I am disappointed that the Phillies are not more interested in getting these things right than they seem to be. I suspect they painted themselves in a corner with some past distance quotes, and felt like they had to keep doing it. After all, if last year's homer was reported as 496 feet, and this one went farther (as it apparently did), you have to go higher. I just don't get how they can show it landing short of a 482 marker and call it 505 with a straight face...

      It would be nice if the Phillies would let me help them make accurate distance estimates (I offered back in Jan. 2006), but is it expecting too much for them to consult with someone who has publicly contradicted them? Maybe... 505 down to 455 is a bitter pill to swallow... for me, accuracy is more important, after all I had Howard's 4/23/06 homer at 491 (from some very limited camera angles) until this new info came out, and now it's down to 442. I've taken the medicine, now I feel better. I think we do the hitters a service by being accurate, and not embellishing these things; a 455 foot homer is a thing of beauty, it shouldn't have to be exaggerated to be respected...
      ESPN Home Run Tracker
      Home run distances for every home run hit in MLB

      http://www.hittrackeronline.com

      Comment


      • Daryle Ward hit a ball at PNC Park that hit the guard shack (yellow building in CF) in straightaway center field (412 in the CF notch). Kip Wells (the current Cardinal) once hit the top of the Batter's Eye in Center Field at PNC Park.

        Comment


        • Hit Tracker Analysis Program available for download

          FYI, I have posted a "public" version of Hit Tracker on my site, for download and use by anyone who wants it. Here's the link:

          http://www.hittrackeronline.com/Hit_Tracker_v17A.xls

          I'd like to encourage you to download it and check it out, and contact me via the site if you have any questions, comments or suggestions. Feel free to share this info with anyone you think might find it interesting. You might also want to check out the Hit Tracker forum, where I plan on posting lots more information about Hit Tracker going forward. The link is:

          http://www.hittrackeronline.com.forum
          ESPN Home Run Tracker
          Home run distances for every home run hit in MLB

          http://www.hittrackeronline.com

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Boston Red Sox View Post
            sorry but i read on mlb.com that a red sox hit a home run miles out of the ground. i don't know where though
            Yea and I'll sell anybody the Brooklyn Bridge for a dollar. Miles come on, you probaly misread.

            I'd say if you add all of Mickey Mantles HRs together, he probaly has the most distance of any other player in the history of the game. He was a strong guy, although I never saw him play and he died when I was five, he is my idol. Sure the guy drank and he was injured alot, but if he was a perfectly healthy guy I think Bonds would be passing the Mick right now, or at least Mickey would have hit around 650-760. That's my opinion and any facts on Mickey that would prove my statement wrong would be really appreciated.
            The 27 Time World Series Champions New York Yankees!

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            • A-Rod has hit a few tape measure HRs in his career. He's hit a few that's gone way over 430 ft. Some reached 450. One time I think he hit a 485 ft homerun in LF at Yankee Stadium, but this one I'm not to sure about.
              The 27 Time World Series Champions New York Yankees!

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              • I'd say if you add all of Mickey Mantles HRs together, he probaly has the most distance of any other player in the history of the game.
                You must be forgetting about Babe Ruth. I don't think anyone would argue that he and Mantle are in the top 5 (and perhaps the top 2) distance HR hitters ever, and Ruth hit 1/3 more homers than Mantle. Mantle's homers would have had to go 100 ft longer per homer...

                No argument on what he might have done if healthy, though - he sure had a sweet swing, from what video I've seen. On the other hand, if Ruth had started out as an outfielder...
                ESPN Home Run Tracker
                Home run distances for every home run hit in MLB

                http://www.hittrackeronline.com

                Comment


                • There has been a lot of exaggeration regarding home run distances. Actual home runs of 500 feet are truly rare.

                  Everyone should read this Bill Jenkinson article, "Long distance Home Runs", linked below. Jenkinson can be dubbed the premiere "Home Run Historian" of baseball. He has been researching tape measure home runs for about 30 years.

                  http://www.baseball-almanac.com/feats/art_hr.shtml

                  Another interesting article, "The Myth of the 500 Foot Home Run::

                  http://www.slate.com/id/2095/

                  My opinion is that the maximum distance a baseball can be hit given a game-type bat (as opposed to a fungo bat) near sea-level in relatively calm wind conditions is about 530 feet. The only person who brings doubt about this limit into my mind is Ruth.

                  Ruth was clearly a freak. He's still unmatched to this day. He fungoed a baseball 422 feet (using a fungo bat) towards the end of his career. One account claims that he fungoed a baseball 447 feet, but I find that hard to believe. 500-foot power has been documented for many of Ruth's homers.

                  500 feet is a LONG way. I've seen A-Rod hit two shots in Ynakee Stadium that seemed to represent optimal efforts (one off a 95-MPH fastball) that carried about 485 feet (landed near the ambulance in deep LF).

                  Mantle's 565-foot shot didn't travel all that way on the fly. It bounced, and was picked up by a neighborhood boy. Jenkinson estimates 506-510 feet in the air for this HR.

                  Cecil Fielder's shot over the LF bleachers in Milwaukee was a legitimate 500-foot shot.

                  Many of the HRs that land in upper decks are wildly overestimated as to the distance they would have traveled.
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                  • Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
                    There has been a lot of exaggeration regarding home run distances. Actual home runs of 500 feet are truly rare.

                    Everyone should read this Bill Jenkinson article, "Long distance Home Runs", linked below. Jenkinson can be dubbed the premiere "Home Run Historian" of baseball. He has been researching tape measure home runs for about 30 years.

                    http://www.baseball-almanac.com/feats/art_hr.shtml

                    Another interesting article, "The Myth of the 500 Foot Home Run::

                    http://www.slate.com/id/2095/

                    My opinion is that the maximum distance a baseball can be hit given a game-type bat (as opposed to a fungo bat) near sea-level in relatively calm wind conditions is about 530 feet. The only person who brings doubt about this limit into my mind is Ruth.

                    Ruth was clearly a freak. He's still unmatched to this day. He fungoed a baseball 422 feet (using a fungo bat) towards the end of his career. One account claims that he fungoed a baseball 447 feet, but I find that hard to believe. 500-foot power has been documented for many of Ruth's homers.

                    500 feet is a LONG way. I've seen A-Rod hit two shots in Ynakee Stadium that seemed to represent optimal efforts (one off a 95-MPH fastball) that carried about 485 feet (landed near the ambulance in deep LF).

                    Mantle's 565-foot shot didn't travel all that way on the fly. It bounced, and was picked up by a neighborhood boy. Jenkinson estimates 506-510 feet in the air for this HR.

                    Cecil Fielder's shot over the LF bleachers in Milwaukee was a legitimate 500-foot shot.

                    Many of the HRs that land in upper decks are wildly overestimated as to the distance they would have traveled.
                    I am working on an analysis of Fielder's homer for my site: right now, it looks like the County Stadium homer was more in the neighborhood of 470 feet. I'm having some trouble getting weather data for the time he hit it, but with no wind, it comes out to 467 feet.

                    Ever notice that there about 10X as many homers that are cited as being just over 500 feet as there are ones that are just under 500 feet? It's the "baker's dozen" approach to homers: no one will mind if they add a little to everything. That's how we got to the state we're in, where everything is exaggerated...
                    ESPN Home Run Tracker
                    Home run distances for every home run hit in MLB

                    http://www.hittrackeronline.com

                    Comment


                    • I think Fielder's shot was longer than 467. I have it on tape, and it literally left the stadium, and was hit relatively on a line.

                      I agree that Howard's shot in Philly was overstated. When I saw the highlight, I said "440", not the 491 or whatever they claimed.

                      Here's another article regarding tape measure home runs:

                      Tall tales of the tape:

                      http://www.star-telegram.com/284/story/177856.html

                      BTW, Jay Buhner hit the longest measurable HR (meaning that it landed on the ground, not in an upper deck or bleachers) at the New Yankee Stadium, estimated at 493 feet. I have that one on tape too, somewhere. He mauled it. Too bad no one knows the precise landing spot of that shot, or the two 480-485 foot shots A-Rod hit to the same area. Another bomb in Yankee Stadium is the 474-foot shot (actually measured by Yankee Stadium grounds crew, as Al Trautwig taped a feature) hit by Juan Encarnacion, off of Ramiro Mendoza. It was the only ball to reach the left field bleachers in the new Yankee Stadium (1976-present). It went about 3 rows in, over the Chock-fulla-Nuts sign in LCF.

                      The longest HR I saw in person is Piazza's estimated 482-foot shot off of Ramiro Mendoza (again) at Shea. That blast landed on the back side of the party tent. Amazing.
                      Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 08-05-2007, 03:27 PM.
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                      • Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
                        I think Fielder's shot was longer than 467. I have it on tape, and it literally left the stadium, and was hit relatively on a line.
                        One of my volunteers is a producer at a TV station, and he got hold of the Fielder HR video. He was able to frame count it to the point where it left the stadium. It took 5.23 seconds to reach a point 430 feet from home plate, at approximately 53 feet above field level. That turns out to be close to a 35 degree launch angle, near optimal (as might be expected), not really on a line. The only reason I haven't posted it yet is we're still digging for the weather, trying to find some source for wind that evening in Milwaukee near the stadium...

                        The reason this one looks longer than 467 is that there is nothing behind the LF bleachers. Most stadium outer walls (except for Fenway, Wrigley and MinuteMaid) are more than 430 feet from home plate, with all the concourses, playgrounds, giant coke bottles, etc. behind the main seating area. County Stadium didn't have that, which is why a 467 foot homer (or whatever it turns out to be) is capable of leaving the park entirely...

                        Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
                        I agree that Howard's shot in Philly was overstated. When I saw the highlight, I said "440", not the 491 or whatever they claimed.

                        Here's another article regarding tape measure home runs:

                        Tall tales of the tape:

                        http://www.star-telegram.com/284/story/177856.html

                        BTW, Jay Buhner hit the longest measurable HR (meaning that it landed on the ground, not in an upper deck or bleachers) at the New Yankee Stadium, estimated at 493 feet. I have that one on tape too, somewhere. He mauled it. Too bad no one knows the precise landing spot of that shot, or the two 480-485 foot shots A-Rod hit to the same area. Another bomb in Yankee Stadium is the 474-foot shot (actually measured by Yankee Stadium grounds crew, as Al Trautwig taped a feature) hit by Juan Encarnacion, off of Ramiro Mendoza. It was the only ball to reach the left field bleachers in the new Yankee Stadium (1976-present). It went about 3 rows in, over the Chock-fulla-Nuts sign in LCF.

                        The longest HR I saw in person is Piazza's estimated 482-foot shot off of Ramiro Mendoza (again) at Shea. That blast landed on the back side of the party tent. Amazing.
                        Those all sound like good ones to analyze, I will keep an eye peeled for the video. If you have a link to any, please share!
                        ESPN Home Run Tracker
                        Home run distances for every home run hit in MLB

                        http://www.hittrackeronline.com

                        Comment


                        • OK, lots of stuff.

                          Buhner's shot is called 479 feet on the internet (multiple mentions), but I could swear that the Yankees themselves hold it to be 493. They played Buhner's shot in a special 10-minute segment on YES a day or two after Encarnacion's shot into the LF bleachers off of Mendoza. I will look for that video tape.

                          Joe Torre had a funny quote about the blastl hit off his pitcher, Mendoza: "That ball was stuck".

                          I got the footage of many other tape measure HRs from ESPN, from a show around the time of the All-Star home run derby about 5 years ago. Included were:

                          -Jimmy Wynn's blast over the huge scoreboard in LF at Crosley Field, which bounced onto the highway
                          -Reggie's All-Star HR off the transformer in Tiger Stadium off Doc Ellis
                          -Piazza's shot beyond the seats in LCF in Coors (they called it 496)
                          -Fielder's blast to LF in Milwaukee that went over the bleachers and out of the park
                          -Strawberry's HR off the roof in Montreal (probably the hardest to even try to measure)
                          -Fielder bombarding the roof in Tiger Stadium
                          -Larry Walker's upper deck shot in Coors
                          -Andres Galarraga's LF bomb in Pro Player off of a hanging curve from Kevin Brown

                          I just tracked down another long shot I dimly remember, having seen it on TV during a night game that took place in Yankee Stadium decades ago. Joe Charboneau, while a rookie for the Indians in 1980, hit only the 3rd ball into the upper deck in LF at Yankee Stadium up to that time. Third row. I looked up the game on retrosheet, and found it: June 28, 1980. Further research turned up this:

                          ***begin excerpt***

                          The highlight of the season came on June 28 in an 11-10 loss to the Yankees in New York. Charboneau blasted a home run into the third deck of Yankee Stadium, reached previously by only two players, Hall of Famer Jimmie Foxx and Frank Howard.

                          "I remember it like it was yesterday," said Charboneau. "Tom Underwood, a left-hander, was pitching for the Yankees. It was the first time I ever faced him, and I got ahead in the count, 3-and-1, and looked for a fastball in, which I got. I swung, and I never hit a ball better.

                          "As I was going around second base, I looked up to where the ball landed and thought to myself that I'd probably never hit another ball like that again. And I never did. It was a once-in-a-lifetime swing. Later they told me it was one of the three longest home runs ever hit in Yankee Stadium. Imagine that! Yankee Stadium, the 'House that Ruth built.'

                          "The whole thing was unbelievable. It seemed like the ball carried forever." The memory of it does for Charboneau.

                          http://www.freetimes.com/stories/15/12/summer-reading

                          **end excerpt***

                          Other shots into the upper deck in LF at Yankee Stadium (which is both farther from the plate and more deeply angled away from home plate than the upper deck in RF) have been hit by:

                          -Jessie Barfield (as a Yankee, first row)
                          -Jose Canseco (as a Yankee, first row)
                          -Gary Sheffield (as a Yankee)
                          -Cecil Fielder (as a Tiger)
                          -Alex Rodriguez (twice, both as a Yankee, one reaching 6-8 rows up, and also a third HR high off the fair screen as a Mariner)
                          -Canseco (as an Oakland A) and A-Rod also hit shots off the facing of the upper deck in LF, well away from the foul pole. A-Rod did it earlier this year. I was at a game in the 80's when Canseco did it. Bonk! Pretty amazing to hear that bang all the way from seats behind 1st base.

                          Another bomb in Yankee Stadium few remember was hit by Bo Jackson. Batting right-handed, he hit a shot into the RF bleachers that, if memory serves, went past the last row of seats. That is an amazing opposite-field shot.

                          For those into Yankee Stadium history, by the way, two tidbits:
                          -Homplate in the old Stadium was 20 feet behind its present location
                          -About 10 rows of seats were added to the upper deck during the renovation

                          Lastly, here's further proof that titanic home runs are no myth:



                          That's Gene Stephens looking up at Mantle's 502-foot HR, which went over the black screen used for a batter's eye. Hey, how deep was that guy playing?



                          On August 12, 1964, Mickey Mantle hit switch hit home runs during the same game for the tenth time in his career - a new Major League record. The first blast cleared the 461-foot marker, carried over the 22 foot screen, and landed approximately 14 rows into the bleachers. A reporter told Mantle after the game that the ball traveled 502 feet and Mantle replied, "Aw, I didn't hit it all that good."

                          http://www.baseball-almanac.com/yearly/yr1964a.shtml
                          Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 08-11-2007, 04:49 AM. Reason: Photo added
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                          • Hearing from Mantle himself that he didn't hit it all that good truly emphasizes how powerful he was...It just adds to the prestige of its legendary blast off the facade in Old Yankee Stadium back in 1963, when he called it the hardest ball he had ever hit.

                            Speaking of that blast, he someone knows for sure how far the facade was set back behind the right field fence, please let me know. The various distances from homeplate that have been given for this homerun are very confusing. From the different sources I got (whether NY Times or books that have been written), I have either 374, 370 or 367 feet. Which one is right? And more importantly, was it the horizontal distance or the distance from the ground to the point of impact (hypothenus)???

                            About the homeruns SultanofWhat stated, I remember the one Buhner exploded back in early 90s...I clearly recall him flipping his bat toward the pitcher on his follow through, wow! And what about Piazza's shot at Shea (I was watching the game on TV when he connected and the ball landed on the tent behind the back wall in right field. Holy cow! Great memories...

                            And about Charboneau...one thing that I don't understand is why they said it was only the third ball hit in the LF Upper Deck up to that time, when you know Mantle hit quite a few hitting right-handed in the Upper Deck there...Strange...Anyways, it was certainly a great blast!

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by FeelthePower View Post
                              Hearing from Mantle himself that he didn't hit it all that good truly emphasizes how powerful he was...It just adds to the prestige of its legendary blast off the facade in Old Yankee Stadium back in 1963, when he called it the hardest ball he had ever hit.

                              Speaking of that blast, he someone knows for sure how far the facade was set back behind the right field fence, please let me know. The various distances from homeplate that have been given for this homerun are very confusing. From the different sources I got (whether NY Times or books that have been written), I have either 374, 370 or 367 feet. Which one is right? And more importantly, was it the horizontal distance or the distance from the ground to the point of impact (hypothenus)???
                              That was some bomb. Anyone remember that inter-league game when the Giants played the Yanks at Yankee Stadium, might have been in 2002.

                              Barry Bonds hit one in that upper deck right by the exit ramp in right field, hit a mile. I began to think, that ball was in orbit and then wondered what did Mantle's blast look like. I'm looking at that ramp and then looking at the facade, looks to be about 25 or 30+ feet higher than the ramp. Too bad there is no footage of that one.

                              I never left the room when Mantle, killebrew or Frank Howard came to bat, always a chance of seeing one of those monster drives these guys could hit.

                              If I recall Frank did not have quite the uppercut swing that Mick and Harmon had. He hit some of the quickest home runs I ever saw. Hard to believe anyone could hit a line drive as far as he did, gone in a second.

                              Comment


                              • In the 15 year history of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, no player still has yet to hit a homerun during a game which has struck the B & O Warehouse, which is approximately 450 at its closest point.

                                Ken Griffey Jr. hit the warehouse during the 1993 All Star homerun hitting contest, and I'm assuming numerous ballplayers have probably hit it during pre-game batting practice. But far as I know, no one has yet to strike the building during a game.

                                Comment

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