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Polo Grounds [IV] / Brush Stadium (1911-1963)

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  • Originally posted by six4three View Post
    What are they doing, that Adcock is wearing trousers with his jersey and cap?
    Adcock is pointing out where his Center Field Homerun was hit. Aaron had become the second player in history to hit a HR to center the previous day. That business about Ernie Lombardi in an earlier post is incorrect.

    It's Adcock
    Aaron
    Brock
    Luke Easter in a Negro League game.

    It's a simple photo op the day Aaron hit his CF homer.
    "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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    • Originally posted by StanTheMan View Post
      The more I think about it, you may be right. PLENTY of big time sluggers played at the Polo Grounds, and there were very few balls hit out of the park to center, but the likelihood that a modern player would pull it off is probably greater the more than I think about it.... consider my mind nearly convinced.

      Just don't give video game evidence to convince me further

      At Yankee stadium on August 12, 1964 (Mel Stottlemyre's MLB debut), Mickey Mantle hit homers from both side of the plate. The first one he hit left handed off Ray Herbert of the White Sox that traveled dead center 502 feet AND over the bleacher's 22 foot high batters eye.

      Had that happened at the Polo Grounds, I imagine that it would have hit the CF clubhouse windows with some altitiude to spare. What would the ground rules have been in that instance? Would the ball be still in play? A ground rule double? Was there a height defining a homerun?

      Like Adcock, and Aaron and the other predecessors, all without steroids....

      On the videogame sidelight: Its fun to hit BP with Mister Bonds on Acclaim's All Star Baseball 2005 set to Ebbets Field, Polo Grounds, Tiger, and Crosley.
      At Ebbets, I've hit the scoreboard clock (doesn't shatter.. lol), and even won a few Abe Stark suits. The ballpark physics are fairly accurate and it gives you a pretty fiair idea of just how hard it was to hit the "win Suit" sign on the fly.

      Dennis
      BrooklynDodger14

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      • Originally posted by brooklyndodger14 View Post
        At Yankee stadium on August 12, 1964 (Mel Stottlemyre's MLB debut), Mickey Mantle hit homers from both side of the plate. The first one he hit left handed off Ray Herbert of the White Sox that traveled dead center 502 feet AND over the bleacher's 22 foot high batters eye.

        Had that happened at the Polo Grounds, I imagine that it would have hit the CF clubhouse windows with some altitiude to spare. What would the ground rules have been in that instance? Would the ball be still in play? A ground rule double? Was there a height defining a homerun?

        Dennis
        BrooklynDodger14
        No ground rules were ever established for balls hit off the CF clubhouse. Which in hindsight, was perfectly fine, as no batted ball ever hit it. Sure, balls have been hit with enough distance to reach the Clubhouse and CF bleachers... but at OTHER parks.

        Players today (and in some respects players of yesteryear hitting at other parks) had little to worry about when taking one deep to CF at Ebbets, Sportmans, Shibe, Crosley, etc. But battters at the PG did not have this mindset from the moment they dug into the batters box. In fact, I'll wager that Aaron, Adcock, and Brock's HR were "mistake" hrs... meaning they did NOT hit the ball where they intended to hit it. They did happen to get all of it, obviously.

        Even the geat Musial admitted he tried to pull EVERY pitch he swung at while at the PG, even those on the outside corner. A modern example is Rick Ankiel, he tries to pull EVERYTHING, even the outside corner stuff, by getting out in front of the pitch and kind of "hooking" the outside pitches to right of right center. It's hilarious to see him take a backdoor slider from a righthander and pull it over the 2Bman head for a single. But if he misses that pitch, he looks bad doing so.

        I guess what I am getting at is that Mantle (anyone really) would NOT have gone up to the plate thinking

        .... pull anything middle in, and take any pitch away to deep center......

        Not the mindset he would have had, in all probability. That is not to say that he would have not hit the clubhouse if he had played more games there, but there were PLENTY Of big sluggers who had HUNDREDS of AB"s there, and never turned the trick to CF or hit the clubhouse.
        "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

        Comment


        • Originally posted by StanTheMan View Post
          Adcock is pointing out where his Center Field Homerun was hit. Aaron had become the second player in history to hit a HR to center the previous day. That business about Ernie Lombardi in an earlier post is incorrect.

          It's Adcock
          Aaron
          Brock
          Luke Easter in a Negro League game.

          It's a simple photo op the day Aaron hit his CF homer.
          Not to get to technical but the bleachers at the Polo Grounds as I am sure you and some other posters are aware, not exactly in CF but just to the left and right of dead center. Not to take anything away fom those who hit balls in to those bleachers, probably took a drive around 450- 460+ feet.
          Attached Files

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          • Honestly, the shape of the Polo Grounds field looks like something out of a bad baseball video game. No wonder the Giants and Mets couldn't wait to get out of there.

            A 280 foot pop up could be a home run, but a 460 foot blast to CF could be caught for an out. Doesn't make sense to me. That's a little extreme.
            Bats, they are sick. I cannot hit curveball. Straightball I hit it very much. Curveball, bats are afraid. I ask Jobu to come, take fear from bats. I offer him cigar, and rum. He will come.

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            • Originally posted by curb my enthusiasm View Post
              Honestly, the shape of the Polo Grounds field looks like something out of a bad baseball video game. No wonder the Giants and Mets couldn't wait to get out of there.

              A 280 foot pop up could be a home run, but a 460 foot blast to CF could be caught for an out. Doesn't make sense to me. That's a little extreme.
              That's what made it so unique and interesting (IMHO). The PG giveth and the PG taketh away..............better than those boring, perfectly circular, cookie-cutter fields (again, IMHO).
              you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
              http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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              • BTW, both teams' bullpens were in fair territory, too! That made for a lot of very interesting plays: balls hit into these gaps (left and right center) would scatter all the relievers, catchers, and coaches in every direction, as the outfielder chased, and dug out the ball...........very exciting stuff.
                you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

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                • Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                  Not to get to technical but the bleachers at the Polo Grounds as I am sure you and some other posters are aware, not exactly in CF but just to the left and right of dead center. Not to take anything away fom those who hit balls in to those bleachers, probably took a drive around 450- 460+ feet.
                  Does anyone here have the ability to superimpose Yankee Stadium's outfield walls onto this Polo Grounds drawing or one like it? I'd like to see a direct comparison between the two.

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                  • Originally posted by Lpeters199 View Post
                    Does anyone here have the ability to superimpose Yankee Stadium's outfield walls onto this Polo Grounds drawing or one like it? I'd like to see a direct comparison between the two.

                    Here are the field dimensions as seen in THE BALLPARKS (Shannon & Kalinsky, 1975, Hawthorn).

                    On the overlay, the Polo Grounds are outlined in green.

                    Hope this helps...


                    Dennis
                    BrooklynDodger14
                    Attached Files

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                    • That last comparison pic with PG/YS illustrates perfectly why I respect Hank's homerun totals way more than Ruth's.

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                      • Originally posted by Pelt View Post
                        That last comparison pic with PG/YS illustrates perfectly why I respect Hank's homerun totals way more than Ruth's.
                        Don't forget this little fact: Aaron had 3,965 more at bats than the Babe.
                        you can take the Dodgers out of Brooklyn, but you can't take the Brooklyn out of the DODGERS
                        http://brooklyndodgermemories.freeforums.org/

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Pelt View Post
                          That last comparison pic with PG/YS illustrates perfectly why I respect Hank's homerun totals way more than Ruth's.
                          Dont forget that the fences were moved in for Aaron in Atlanta. Thats why guys like Dave Johnson hit 40+ HRs there.
                          http://soundbounder.blogspot.com/

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                          • Originally posted by Pelt View Post
                            That last comparison pic with PG/YS illustrates perfectly why I respect Hank's homerun totals way more than Ruth's.
                            Not sure how to take that, Ruth spent 3 seasons at Polo and and 12 at Yankee Stadium. Don't let the right field line fool you, overall Yankee Stadium was hugh, not the best park for hitting home runs overall.

                            Also the diagram ( post # 854) you are looking at was after some dimensions were shortened in 1937. It was 429 right around where you see 367 to deep RCF and that 461 you see was 487 when Ruth played there.
                            Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 07-04-2008, 11:15 AM.

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                            • Many people have forgotten, Ruth hit a lot of home runs to deep right-center field. Yankee Stadium certainly did help him, but he hit a ton of homers that would have been gone in any park.

                              Plus, he played half of his games (like every other player) on the road, and fences were generally much deeper back then. So while he did get homers from YS's RF porch, he also had a ton robbed from him due to deeper fences both at YS and at other parks in the majors.

                              Also, he started his career in the dead-ball era, and can really be considered the first real power hitter of all time. He helped revolutionize how the game was played. Not to take anything away from Hank Aaron, who was a terrific hitter himself (undoubtedly), but Babe Ruth was the best home run hitter - and one of, if not the best hitter overall - ever to live.

                              (And he could pitch too! He could definitely play baseball, no doubt.)

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                              • It's often pointed out the ease of hitting home runs down the lines at the Polo Grounds and it true. But look at this, how fast it gets deep not far from the lines and also compare the far greater distances in the power alleys and of course CF there compared to other NL parks in 1939.
                                Attached Files

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