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Polo Grounds [IV] / Brush Stadium (1911-1963)

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    Lefty Bunter
    Registered User

  • Lefty Bunter
    replied
    The Giants had offices on 42d Street, I believe.

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  • 3rdGenCub
    Registered User

  • 3rdGenCub
    replied
    I know that the Giants team president's office was on the top floor of the CF clubhouse, plus I believe offices for a few other team senior officers. However, where were the offices for the more junior staff (tickets, concessions, accounting, etc.)? In pictures of the Polo Grounds looking down from Coogan's Bluff, there is a 3-story building jutting out from the exterior Polo Ground exterior walls behind home plate & down the 1b line. Could this be their location or were they located offsite like the Brooklyn Dodgers (circa 1947) had moved their team offices to building elsewhere in Brooklyn from Ebbetts?

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  • Gary Dunaier
    Thumbs Down Guy/Moderator

  • Gary Dunaier
    replied
    Here's a new (to me) discovery: an awesome color photo of the Polo Grounds scoreboard as it appeared when the Mets played there. It's presented in the form of a fantasy 1962 Topps baseball card.



    (Source: "Mets Baseball Cards Like They Ought To Be")

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  • MrCubFan
    Hey-Heeey!!

  • MrCubFan
    replied
    Home teams typically chose the dugout that would have the lesser amount of hot sunshine streaming in during the games. Or at least that's always been my assumption. There can be other factors: https://www.quora.com/How-do-teams-d...heir-home-park Unfortunately, Clem's Baseball website does not seem to have that info. One of the quora comments has to do with the manager coaching from third base. There might be some truth behind that, but not with the Polo Grounds, at least in its later years. In the clips of the Bobby Thompson pennant-winning homer, you can see Eddie Stanky running from the first base dugout, across part of fair territory (!) toward manager Durocher in the third base coach's box, then jumping all over him in pure joy.
    MrCubFan
    Hey-Heeey!!
    Last edited by MrCubFan; 09-17-2021, 03:47 PM.

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  • dstoffa
    Registered User

  • dstoffa
    replied
    Originally posted by rick140156 View Post
    I'm 57 and a huge Giants fan from the Bay area. I started going to Candlestick park in 1968 when I was 4 years old. When the Giants played at the Stick, they used the 1st base Dugout. When moving to PacBell, SBC, AT&T, Oracle Park they changed and used the 3rd base Dugout. My Question is what dugout did the Giants use when they played at the Polo Grounds? I know the Clubhouses were in the center field below the scoreboard/advertisement cigarette. Was there a restroom in the dugouts? Also were there any concourses, concession stands, restrooms in the upper deck? It looked like there was nothing in Leftfield at all. Was there an Organ and music played on the P.A system? Also because there are not many interiors photo's of the concourses, what was the restroom/concession stand/walkway situation like in the lower bowl?
    Based on this photo of Stan the Man in the on-deck circle, the Giants (and I assume the Mets later) used the first base dugout, and the visitors used the third base dugout.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/baseball/co...ircle_in_polo/


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  • rick140156
    Registered User

  • rick140156
    replied
    I'm 57 and a huge Giants fan from the Bay area. I started going to Candlestick park in 1968 when I was 4 years old. When the Giants played at the Stick, they used the 1st base Dugout. When moving to PacBell, SBC, AT&T, Oracle Park they changed and used the 3rd base Dugout. My Question is what dugout did the Giants use when they played at the Polo Grounds? I know the Clubhouses were in the center field below the scoreboard/advertisement cigarette. Was there a restroom in the dugouts? Also were there any concourses, concession stands, restrooms in the upper deck? It looked like there was nothing in Leftfield at all. Was there an Organ and music played on the P.A system? Also because there are not many interiors photo's of the concourses, what was the restroom/concession stand/walkway situation like in the lower bowl?
    rick140156
    Registered User
    Last edited by rick140156; 09-17-2021, 04:13 AM.

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  • scottybk
    Registered User

  • scottybk
    replied
    Would Polo Grounds be remembered more fondly if it had been demolished in 1958, instead of closing for 5 years and then having Mets use it for 2 years?

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  • SJLT252
    Registered User

  • SJLT252
    replied
    Originally posted by Mario Mendoza...HOF Lock View Post

    The detail of the PG is impressive. My recall of how these games looked only 10 years ago is quickly overtaken by the wonderment of what they are going to look like 10 years in the future. By then, this may look primitive.
    10 years later this is how they look 2 video game systems later

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  • epaddon
    Registered User

  • epaddon
    replied
    After posting this picture to another group, someone chimed in and reported that the plaque for the other NY Giants football player honored for being killed in WW2, Al Blozis, was in the gymnasium of the high school he went to in Jersey City, NJ. He sent an old feature story (from the 90s I think) that shows the plaque in place.

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  • epaddon
    Registered User

  • epaddon
    replied
    The Jack Lummus plaque, the only one of the Polo Grounds plaques to have ever turned up after 1957, is on display in the NY Giants museum and here's a great up-close view of it from their website.

    Still unfortunate none of the other missing plaques (and the original Grant memorial) have turned up. In listening to audio of the last NY Giants game in 1957, it is mentioned during the clubhouse interviews at one point that the plaque for former Mayor Jimmy Walker was going to go to restaurateur Toots Shor. Shor's original restaurant closed in 1959 and his follow-up one in the early 70s, so if it went there, it likely was lost for good then.
    You do not have permission to view this gallery.
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  • 3rdGenCub
    Registered User

  • 3rdGenCub
    replied
    Thanks for uploading! Wonderful tv program!

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  • epaddon
    Registered User

  • epaddon
    replied
    I have uploaded to my YouTube channel the April 1964 documentary, "The Polo Grounds-Requiem For An Arena" which aired on the eve of the ballpark's demolition. Actor Horace McMahon (the TV series "Naked City") narrates and hosts from an abandoned Polo Grounds as he recalls the history of the ballpark. Appearing with their own recollections are Frankie Frisch, Carl Hubbell and from inside the abandoned clubhouse, Bobby Thomson and Ralph Branca.

    The documentary was produced by Howard Cosell and aired once on WABC-TV in New York in April 1964 (other stations may have aired it later that year).

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  • StanTheMan
    Back after a decade or so

  • StanTheMan
    replied
    Originally posted by StanTheMan View Post
    Here is as close up a photo of the landing place Shot Heard Round the World as I have seen. The ball entered the stands to the left of the section 35 pole. If you look a two people to the left of the section 35 pole, you see a guy with dark hair, a dark coat or jacket, and a white shirt (you can see a lot of white shirt). He is defninitely celebrating, with both arms in the air. The person to the left of him, has both hands up either protecting themselves, or trying to catch a ball, probably the former. HIs/her head is turned towards the white shirt guy and you can just see the side of his/her head.

    The people to the right side of the photo are looking towards these two. Likewise, the people in the rows further back seem to be generally looking towards these two. I love the guys in the front row to the extreme right of the photo. Leaning WAY out to see if this was going to be an HR. It must have just cleard the wall.

    The few books I have read about the PG, and about the shot heard round the world, state that no one knows who has the ball. One book suggested more than one witness stated a young African American boy ended up with the ball and took off running with it. I think that was Joshua Pragers, or was it Stew Thornley's?



    I'll work on blowing this up a bit more.
    funny... in 2007 I wrote the above, pondering where the ball went. Brian Biegel figured it out.

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  • Matt The Hammer
    Registered User

  • Matt The Hammer
    replied
    Old phonebooks used to have the seating charts too. Basically a large single page ad in the yellowpages.

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  • dstoffa
    Registered User

  • dstoffa
    replied
    Originally posted by hcorday View Post

    Try searching for Mets ticket stubs and Polo Grounds seating chart for that era, then match the price and location of the ticket with the seating chart.
    Wouldn't Mets yearbooks have the seating map and pricing? I recall they (the yearbooks) had such info in later years...

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