Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Yankee Stadium [I] Renovation (1974 - 1975)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by jimmyjimjimz View Post
    so, the outside wall at the current Yankee Stadium is the same outside wall as the pre-renovated stadium? Or did they knock the wall down when they renovated?
    Same.

    The concourses and most of the three deck structure is the same. And the bleachers.

    Comment


    • Seems like yesterday this renovation took place, too bad there is nothing on video for the final game in 1973 and nothing on film showing the renovation.

      Showing the monuments moved and the installation of the bat would make for great viewing. I still think that 463ft sign is under that base of the current bleachers. I had one pic of the scoreboard top coming off but I cannot find it anymore.

      I still remember Dan Ford's homerun and the Yankees 11-4 win with Rudy May pitching and Roy White's homerun.

      Thirty three years went by very quickly.

      New place reminds me of Titanic with all the sections seemingly set up by class/finances.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by WEB View Post
        Showing the monuments moved and the installation of the bat would make for great viewing. I still think that 463ft sign is under that base of the current bleachers. I had one pic of the scoreboard top coming off but I cannot find it anymore.
        I'm not sure about the 463' sign (to the left of the monuments)--they tore out a bunch of bleachers and slightly re-oriented the diamond. I'm pretty sure that the 415', 457' and 463' signs were painted on fences/bleachers that have been removed.
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • Originally posted by monkeypants View Post
          I'm not sure about the 463' sign (to the left of the monuments)--they tore out a bunch of bleachers and slightly re-oriented the diamond. I'm pretty sure that the 415', 457' and 463' signs were painted on fences/bleachers that have been removed.
          Tough to say but a very good picture on your part. Would it be a fair guess to say the 407ft sign in right center field is exactly where the base of the current bleachers are?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by WEB View Post
            Tough to say but a very good picture on your part. Would it be a fair guess to say the 407ft sign in right center field is exactly where the base of the current bleachers are?
            They also lowered the playing field, so the 407' sign would actually be 'floating' on the wall above the current playing field. Whether it is still or not is anyone's guess, but that section of bleachers seams to have been preserved. Maybe it's more less behind the current 385' sign?

            Comment


            • Does anyone know what Unistress did at the Stadium? Did they make the parking garage or anything to do with the Stadium itself? They deal with pre-cast concrete, if my info is correct. I contacted them a while ago and never received a response.

              Thank you.

              -Mike Wagner

              Comment


              • Hmm, were they the ones that did the ribbing of the upper deck expansion and the current concourse on top of the old upper deck one?
                ..."I might have been given a bad break, but I've got an awful lot to live for."

                Comment


                • Does anyone have any diagrams of the suites located under the press box at Yankee Stadium, or at least any information about them? I heard there were 18 of these suites beneath the press box, but am not sure, and couldn't find any close/accurate enough pictures to count them myself (and I couldn't do it at today's game - I was all the way out in Section 39, although I didn't even think of doing it until I already has gotten home).

                  I've always wondered if it would have been possible to extend the press box structure out in both directions, towards the bases, but only instead of having the press in these extensions, have more luxury suites there. If there are 18 suites under the press box, the structure could be extended outward in both directions the distance of 9 of these suites. Thus, there would be 9 more suites on each side of the press box on the lower level (at the same level that the current suites are), and then another row of 9 suites on each side above them, at the same level as the press box, making 18 new suites on each side. !8 times 3, of course, equals 54, which is in fact more than the amount of luxury suites planned for the new YS. Of course, they wouldn't be as large, but they'd all be located between the bases (a good selling point for potential suitors), and it wouldn't completely throw off the look of the 2nd deck (unlike the planned 1998 renovation with the glass).

                  I have a very crude drawing that I did on Paint tonight of what I'm talking about. I stole the photo for this pic from Uncle Bob's Ballparks (by the way - he has some terrific photos of the Stadium there, especially of this area behind home plate). This is a basic concept of these suites on the third base side.


                  I'm putting it in this thread since I figure the 1976 renovation might have produced some diagrams of these suites and the press box, since they were (presumably) put in then (they certainly didn't exist pre-1976, of course). Plus, I wonder if this would have been at all possible, and if the Yankees had considered it. Considering how much the suites played into building a new Stadium, I sometimes wonder that if the Yankees decided this would be a viable option, if it could have been part of a larger renovation that would have saved Yankee Stadium.
                  Last edited by Yankees12; 04-06-2008, 11:50 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Yankee Stadium Facade

                    Mike Wagner here's something. It was in the New York Daily News on Sunday, April 6, 2008. It was in Gallo's New York:

                    Stadium will wear its crown again

                    Do you know the facade that has been hanging atop Yankee Stadium all these years? You know, the thing with the nice, simple design that stands out like a logo on a Kellogg’s box?

                    Well, first let me tell you that it’s not a facade at all. It’s what is called a frieze and its been the ornamental signature of Yankee Stadium since 1923.

                    It turns out this frieze (I kinda like that name) was designed in 1922 by a noted artist of the time. The definition of a frieze, incidentally, is a decorated horizontal part of the upper section of a classical building which acts as a cornice. Originally it was made of copper and swept around the entire stadium’s upper structure.

                    Later the copper was sold and the shell was filled with concrete, but it was regarded as a work of art. When first sketched out, it was meant to give the air of an opera house.

                    All this info comes from a man who should know a frieze from a facade because he’s been looking at it since he was 6, when his dad, a stadium usher, first took him to the big ballpark.

                    Tony Morente himself became an usher and today is the director of Stadium tours, its official historian and in charge of special projects at the “House That Ruth Built.”


                    Morente, a New York guy who wouldn’t trade his life with anybody’s – not even a hoity toity rich-guy type like a Donald Trump – evaluates his job like this: “Giving something back to the community is important to me, and through my work with the Yankees I’ve been able to do that. I’ve helped lend the Yankees to the community by pushing for parties for the homeless, under the auspices of the Red Cross, and I’ve helped get ballplayers to visit hospitals and schools. There’s this thread that runs through my life and it’s the New York Yankees. I’ve always wanted them to do well and to help strengthen the Bronx and the city.”

                    When the park was closed for renovations in 1973, the frieze was cut to a dinky size, it was attached over the scoreboard, which made it almost invisible.

                    In planning the new park, which opens next year, Yankee brass realized the importance of this valuable piece of art, which has been regarded as the official Yankee signature, and wanted to give the prominence it warranted. The new one will again encircle the entire park and it’ll stand out like it did in the glory days of Babe Ruth. It’ll be like the stadium is wearing a regal crown around the top of its tiers once more.


                    I hope this helps. It sort of makes things more confusing in my opinion.

                    "...Later the copper was sold and the shell was filled with concrete..."

                    WHAT????

                    "...All this info comes from a man who should know a frieze from a facade because he’s been looking at it since he was 6...

                    Tony Morente himself became an usher and today is the director of Stadium tours, its official historian and in charge of special projects...”

                    I thought Tony Morente wasn't sure about all this stuff.

                    Also, the New York Post has a Yankee Stadium special pull-out for Sunday April 6th 2008 (I say also because the Daily News has a series too) and the center page is a color picture of the 1949 World Series, game 2. The facade is clearly green. It looks to be a green patina that occurs to weathered copper.
                    Jimmy Dugan: Because there's no crying in baseball. THERE'S NO CRYING IN BASEBALL! No crying! (Tom Hanks, "A League of Their Own" (1992)

                    Comment


                    • Dear cgcoyne2,
                      Thank you for what you sent. Yes, it is confusing. A couple of gentlemen who worked on the renovation told me the frieze currently in Yankee Stadium was made of cement. Nothing was mentioned about copper.

                      I think what really amazes me is the variety of information about the renovation - the confusion - the contradictions - the lack of knowledge.

                      The Yankees themselves have given no help at all. I don't know if they don't want to give any info or don't have any.

                      Information for my book has come from my own searching and kind people, such as yourself and the other wonderful people on Baseball Fever, as well as some people who worked on the project that were also kind enough to help.

                      -Mike Wagner

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Gehrig27 View Post
                        Hmm, were they the ones that did the ribbing of the upper deck expansion and the current concourse on top of the old upper deck one?
                        when they expanded the upper deck, how many rows did they add?

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by jimmyjimjimz View Post
                          when they expanded the upper deck, how many rows did they add?
                          I believe it was 10 additional rows.

                          Dennis
                          BrooklynDodger14

                          Comment


                          • I think it was closer to 15.

                            Another interesting thing about the upper deck...the rail that goes all the way around the upper boxes at the current row C, is actually where the aisle/walkway was in the original stadium. The current row C is where the original tunnels (or catwak as they were back then) brought you out. Supposedly the original catwalks are still there, inside the upperdeck structure.

                            They just cemented up the old openings, build the new upper deck concourse level and put the vomitoriums (yes, that is the official word for the tunnels) pretty much in the middle.

                            More ammo to use when someone says "In the 70s they tore the whole stadium down and rebuilt it".

                            ITS THE SAME BUILDING!!!!!!!!!!

                            Comment


                            • Thats the thing. As far as the actual footprint of the Stadium, the internal guts of the stadium, the foundation, its all the same. It would basically be like if you had a house, they stripped all the interior walls off, most of the exterior walls taken off, they took off the insulation , some rooms were altered but not majorily, kept most of the the studs maybe moved some others around, replaced the windows, took off the roof but kept the frame, and then put it back together. Added some new steps on the outside, etc.
                              It was a major thing what they did, but they kept basically the same internal components. Obvioulsy the columns were removed from the upper deck and some new things were added but was still the same.
                              Last edited by Jim Vaz; 04-07-2008, 12:29 PM.

                              Comment


                              • Yeah, I always get into arguments with people who say that they took down the whole old stadium durring the renovations. I try to explain to them that the actual building is mostly the same; they just added 10 rows to the upper deck because they removed the support columns, lowered the playing field by 6 feet so they built new lower level seating up to the upper deck overhang, and they added escelators to the outside and enclosed the concourses.
                                ..."I might have been given a bad break, but I've got an awful lot to live for."

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X