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  • #46
    Cool Papa Bell sliding into third in 1932. Anyone know the stadium?

    coolpapabellslidingintothird1932.jpg

    http://90feetofperfection.files.word...othird1932.jpg
    Last edited by alpineinc; 02-03-2012, 07:51 AM.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by alpineinc View Post
      Cool Papa Bell sliding into third in 1932. Anyone know the stadium?

      [ATTACH=CONFIG]104497[/ATTACH]

      http://90feetofperfection.files.word...othird1932.jpg
      I see an ad for the Washington Post under the scoreboard... Perhaps it's Griffith Stadium?

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      • #48
        The date of the picture might be wrong...

        http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-Ball-C...ht_1332wt_1348

        If the stadium is Griffith, the light tower wouldn't appear until 1941... The Grays also called DC their "home away from home..."
        Last edited by Capital City Goofball; 02-03-2012, 09:08 AM.

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        • #49
          Homestead Park

          Originally posted by Capital City Goofball View Post
          I see an ad for the Washington Post under the scoreboard... Perhaps it's Griffith Stadium?
          I think Griffith Stadium is a good guess. Brodt's Hats were in DC and NY. Shah & Shah Law offices are in DC.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by BalUmp View Post
            I was looking for Bugle Field (Baltimore) on your NAL list but did not see it. Wikipedia says it was torn down in 1949 during the playoffs so I guess this article for an NAL playoff game there must be the last game played at the Field.

            Did Bugle Field have another name?

            Thanks,
            BalUmp
            I believe Bugle Field was also called Moore's Field. First used in 1932.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by KJOK View Post
              I believe Bugle Field was also called Moore's Field. First used in 1932.
              I can't find any evidence of this. Is there a basis for the speculation?
              Put it in the books.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by milladrive View Post
                I can't find any evidence of this. Is there a basis for the speculation?
                Yes, both Paul Healey and myself have done extensive research on the Baltimore parks. Here is Paul's take:


                "After doing some premilary research, it appears to me that Bugle Field,
                Moore's Field, and Maryland Baseball Park in Baltimore, home of the
                Baltimore Black Sox in the 1920s and early 1930s, are one in the same.
                The park I am referring to is one located on Edison Highway and Biddle
                St. I have also heard Wesport Stadium referred to as Maryland Baseball
                Park and a park located on Bush and Russell between Westport Stadium
                and Camden Yards called Maryland Baseball Park. If anyone can confirm
                my theory about Bugle Field and let me know if the Maryland Baseball
                Park on Bush and Russell was used for anything, please let me know."


                Here was my response:

                "The Baltimore Negro League Stadiums perplexed me for quite a while. I went through many issues of the Baltimore Afro-American, and the best I could figure out was:

                Bugle Field and Moore's Field refer to the same field, played on from at least 1923 thru 1949.

                However, there definitely was a different stadium used for the 1950 season, apparently in a slightly different location, called Maryland Baseball Park and also known as Westport Park."


                I now believe the coordinates for Bugle/Moore are approximately:
                Latitude - 39°18'34.01"N
                Longitude - 76°34'21.77"W

                For Maryland Baseball Park (Westport) (Old one, not 1950 one):
                Latitude - 39°16'20.46"N
                Longitude - 76°37'48.85"W

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                • #53
                  Current Day Sites of Baltimore Parks

                  Baltimore_Bugle_Current.jpgBaltimre_Maryland Park_Current.jpg

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                  • #54
                    Anyone have information about where the 1905 Philadelphia Giants played? I understand that they played in Columbia Park (home of the Philadelphia Athletics) during the 1904 season, but leased or built their own stadium in 1905 so they would not have to work around the Athletics schedule. I just ordered Phil Dixon's book about this team. I would also like to find a logo or even a retro logo for this team.

                    Thanks for any help with this,
                    Terry
                    Last edited by TerryB; 02-17-2012, 02:55 PM.

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                    • #55
                      1095 Philadelphia

                      Originally posted by TerryB View Post
                      Anyone have information about where the 1905 Philadelphia Giants played? I understand that they played in Columbia Park (home of the Philadelphia Athletics) during the 1904 season, but leased or built their own stadium in 1905 so they would not have to work around the Athletics schedule. I just ordered Phil Dixon's book about this team. I would also like to find a logo or even a retro logo for this team.

                      Thanks for any help with this,
                      Terry
                      I think they supposedly played at the East High School Field near Jackson St, Broad St, 13th Street, & E. Snyder Ave, but I haven't been able to confirm that location.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by KJOK View Post
                        I think they supposedly played at the East High School Field near Jackson St, Broad St, 13th Street, & E. Snyder Ave, but I haven't been able to confirm that location.
                        That would match the information about the location found on Wikipedia, but they didn't give a name for the stadium or mention that it was at a high school.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Capital City Goofball View Post
                          Interestingly, Wikipedia says the Dyckman Oval was home to the New York Lincoln Giants from 1914-1917. Although that may or may not be correct, and although it's known that the New York Cuban Stars played there for many years beginning in the early 1920s, all reliable sources say the New York Cubans moved after two years from Hinchcliffe Stadium in Paterson, NJ, into the Dyckman Oval in 1935, where they remained until 1938. I'm guessing that's why the pic above with the sign saying New York Cubans is dated 1937.

                          From the My Inwood website:

                          The year was 1935. Babe Ruth, the Bambino, was reveling in the twilight of his fame. The Sultan of Swat, the King of Swing, the Colossus Of Crash had seen better days. Years of hard living and several automobile accidents had taken their toll, but the Babe could still draw a crowd—and the racially diverse spectators at the Dyckman Oval were his kind of people.

                          On September 29, 1935 they came in droves.

                          That sunny afternoon an estimated 10,000 fans came to the 4,600 seat Dyckman Oval to see their hero play on a team of former all stars and minor leaguers in an exhibition game against the New York Cubans of the old Negro League. The price: Fifty-five cents for the grandstands and $1.10 for the big spenders in the box seats.

                          The game, for which Ruth was paid three thousand dollars, would be one of his last.

                          Amid the sea of fans, one lone reporter, Tom Meany of the New York Telegram, realized the tragedy unfolding before his very eyes.

                          “The spectators seemed to sense they were watching something pathetic…There were neither newsreel nor still cameras in evidence and no telegraph keys clattered brassily in the press box, which had less than half a dozen occupants. No civic dignitaries, not even an alderman, could be observed in the crowd.”

                          Paid to play just the first game of a double-header, which the Cubans won 6 to 1, Ruth took to the plate between games to give the ticket holders a bit more bang for their buck. Over the next five minutes, Meany and the 10,000 fans witnessed a piece of baseball history that would never be entered into the record books.

                          As pitcher Clyde Barfoot hurled balls from the mound, The Babe, for a fleeting moment, sprung back to life, slamming ball after ball out of the park. Those in attendance swore one particular baseball was hit further than any in the previous history of the Dyckman Oval.

                          But as Ruth faded into the stuff of legend, the Dyckman Oval was entering its heyday…

                          When the Dyckman Oval first appeared in the sports pages in January of 1920 it was a homely affair located at 204th Street and Nagle Avenue. That first year the Oval was used primarily for ice skating competitions.

                          By 1921, the Oval was drawing baseball fans, including Mayor John F. Hylan, from all five boroughs and beyond.

                          That spring Hylan made an impromptu visit to the Oval to see Jeff Tesreau’s team battle the Cuban Stars. Not recognizing the Mayor as he approached, a later shame-faced gateman demanded to see a ticket. “I haven’t any,” responded the mayor. Gateman, “Well, you’d better get one if you want to see this game.”

                          Luckily for both parties a manager spotted the Mayor and escorted him into the Oval where he immediately took to the mound.

                          The mayor threw four pitches against the opposing team—three of them strikes.

                          Soon boxing was added to the roster. Pugilism would become a staple of the Oval for years to come, but at the time, many doubted the Dyckman Oval could survive the 1920’s.

                          From the elevated subway, on the right, circa 1920's:
                          Dyckman-Oval-undated-Don-Rice-retouched.jpg

                          By 1929 the Dyckman Oval played host to mainly soccer games. Lawsuits and years of poor management had left the once thriving facility on life support.

                          1933:
                          Dyckman-Oval-Beer-Garden-Academy-St-btw-10-Nagel-Avs-1933-2.jpg

                          It was not until 1935, the same year Ruth played his exhibition game that things turned around for the Dyckman Oval, but first a deal with the devil had to be made.

                          Enter Harlem numbers broker Alejandro Pompez who gave the ailing Dyckman Oval a sixty-thousand dollar shot in the arm to use as a showcase for his prized baseball team, The New York Cubans.

                          A 2003 Sports Illustrated article written by Daniel Coyle provides a wonderful description of Pompez.

                          “Pompez was a criminal in the eyes of the police and a crown prince in the eyes of Harlemites. From his cigar store, the soft spoken Cuban ran a numbers bank—a lottery that filled his pockets to the tune of $8,000 a day—which he used to fund his Negro league baseball team, the New York Cubans. Courtly, suave and scrupulously honest with his clients, Pompez was beloved in Harlem for his civic generosity.

                          All went swimmingly for him until an evening in 1931 when the Bronx-based gangster Arthur Flegenheimer, better known as Dutch Schultz, employed his .45 revolver to persuade Pompez to hand over control of the numbers game. Needing another source of income, Pompez turned to sports enterprises. In 1935 he leased a vacant field at Dyckman Oval from the city and transformed it into one of the finest sports palaces in Manhattan.”

                          Pompez put his money to good use. Under his renovations the Dyckman Oval was transformed into shining new 10,000 seat arena with modern conveniences like floodlights for playing well into the night.

                          A master showman, Pompez knew how to fill the house. If Babe Ruth didn’t dazzle them then perhaps a boxing exhibition with Joe Louis, a new car raffle—whatever it took.

                          1940 Cubans:
                          1940_NYCubans.jpg

                          The Oval, often called “Harlem’s Own,” was also a melting pot where all New Yorkers could gather and simply enjoy a ball game—and Pompez’s New York Cubans knew how to delight.

                          Player-manager Martin Dihigo was clearly a house favorite. Dubbed “El Maestro” by fans and sportswriters alike, Dihigo could play all nine positions with equal skill. His lightening speed fastballs remain the stuff of legend. Often called the most versatile player in the history of baseball, the six-foot-three, 210 pound, right-handed Cuban would eventually be elected to the Mexican, Cuban and American Halls of Fame.

                          Martin Dihigo:
                          Martin-Dihigo.jpg

                          The entire team, comprised of Cuban, African-American, Puerto Rican and Dominican players proved a force to be reckoned with—even when playing against legendary teams like Satchel Paige and his Pittsburgh Crawfords.

                          But the days of wine and roses couldn’t last forever—the team’s owner, Alex Pompez, was, after all, a career criminal. When rival gangsters gunned down Dutch Schultz in October of 1935, Pompez went back into the numbers rackets.

                          The move would prove a serious miscalculation.

                          In 1936 New York County District Attorney Thomas Dewey was preparing an indictment against Pompez for his involvement in the policy rackets. Receiving a tip, Pompez fled the country.

                          When Mexican authorities arrested Pompez on March 28, 1937 he was traveling under the name Antonio Moreno. Federales in Mexico City nabbed baseball’s greatest fugitive as he stepped into a bulletproof car with Chicago license plates.

                          Pompez’ legal difficulties would prove disastrous for his beloved franchise. While the Dyckman Oval would continue to host sporting events, the New York Cubans stopped playing altogether.

                          On May 16, 1939, after providing lengthy testimony for the prosecution, Pompez pleaded guilty to conspiracy in return for a two year suspended sentence.

                          When the Cubans were readmitted to the Negro National League in 1939 they would find themselves without a home.

                          In 1938, perhaps to spite the admitted gangster, the City of New York demolished the Dyckman Oval and turned the grand old field into a parking lot.

                          Dyckman Housing Complex, 1951:
                          Dyckman-Houses-aerial-view-1951-8.jpg
                          Put it in the books.

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                          • #58
                            Great article.

                            It always pains me to see the sites of old urban ballparks later filled with sprawling projects. In hindsight, would have probably done the areas more good by leaving the fields and making them public parks.

                            Showcasing the finest photography to illuminate the lesser known stories from classic baseball. Now over 2000 followers!
                            https://twitter.com/behindthebagbtb

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                            • #59
                              Interestingly, Wikipedia says the Dyckman Oval was home to the New York Lincoln Giants from 1914-1917. Although that may or may not be correct
                              It's definitely incorrect. Negro League teams did not start playing there until 1921, and the last known game appears to be 1936.
                              The pre-1920 New York Lincoln Giants played at Olympic Field.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by KJOK View Post
                                It's definitely incorrect. Negro League teams did not start playing there until 1921...

                                *snip*

                                The pre-1920 New York Lincoln Giants played at Olympic Field.
                                That's what I thought. Thanks much for confirming it.

                                ....and the last known game appears to be 1936.
                                You could be right. Although the pic above is definitely dated 1937, the article clearly states...

                                "In 1936 New York County District Attorney Thomas Dewey was preparing an indictment against Pompez for his involvement in the policy rackets. Receiving a tip, Pompez fled the country....

                                Pompez’ legal difficulties would prove disastrous for his beloved franchise. While the Dyckman Oval would continue to host sporting events, the New York Cubans stopped playing altogether."


                                By the time they began playing again in 1939, the park had been turned into a parking lot during 1938.
                                Put it in the books.

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