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Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum / McAfee C / Network Associates C / UMAX C

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  • Originally posted by Bitter Fan View Post
    Growing up in San Francisco I went to a good number of games at the old set-up and it was a nice stadium. It would be a little dated now but people would still enjoy going to it and the A's would not be so desperately struggling for attendance.
    the sub-par performance of the team devoid of star players has more to do with the lack of customers.
    the turd in the punchbowl
    reality really sucks.
    enjoy the game more...

    Comment


    • The very first big league baseball game a family member took me to was an Oakland A's game in 1986 vs. Toronto. My cousin and I flew from Chicago to Oakland to visit my uncle, and he took us to see the A's and Jays one afternoon. I remember they were giving away gloves to the fans...especially since I still have it, and my kids currently use it. The promotion was sponsored by Wells Fargo Bank. Anyway, Reggie Jackson was in the tail end of his career, and some young kid named Jose Canseco was making his mark in the big leagues.

      I don't remember the score, but I remember the A's won the game. I sat in the 2nd level and met a cool kid from Napa Valley, Ca sitting next to me. It was a great time, and the ballpark was beautiful. Of course, this was well before Mount Davis was erected in the center-field area. The round layout, with the scoreboards and center field videoboard were awesome to look at. Even before outside atmosphere was trendy, the old Oakland Alameda County Coliseum was a great place for baseball.

      I think we all agree Mount Davis ruined a great baseball place. Even though it was first used as a multi-use stadium for the A's and Raiders, when it was a baseball-only stadium, it was a great place. Remember how Busch Stadium looked after it was turned into a baseball-only stadium in its last years? Oakland Alameda County Coliseum could've been just as beautiful if it weren't for Al Davis...plain and simple.
      Follow me on Facebook, or Twitter.

      sigpic If you love your freedom, thank a vet...and this 10-year U.S. Army vet says, "You're welcome.".

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Paul W View Post
        the sub-par performance of the team devoid of star players has more to do with the lack of customers.
        Hence why the A's didn't draw as well during their playoff runs in the 00s as they had in the late 80s. If you think Mt. Davis didn't have anything to do with that, you're kidding yourself.

        Comment


        • I always thought the A's were like the twins, a good young team always making the playoffs then never doing anything in the playoffs. They just didn't have that umph to get over the hump like when the bucs hired john gruden they won the super bowl when dungy couldn't. Now both the twins and A's lost some star players and have to decide how to get back to that point again.
          The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

          Comment


          • I got to attend a game there late in the 2009 season. It was fireworks night, so we got to go on the field to watch the display. Can't complain about getting to walk on a Major League ballfield. The A's are doing the best they can with limited resources, but something must be said. Mount Davis ruined the view of the mountains in the distance, but it didn't ruin a good ballpark, because it never was one.

            The seats in the original grandstand have some pretty bad views. The lower deck is too shallow. There are too many seats that don't face the proper direction. The overly massive foul territory leaves the majority of the seats too far away. Even if the old bleachers had been left in place, this ballpark would still need to be replaced. The construction of Mount Davis only made it more obvious.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Jorge View Post
              I got to attend a game there late in the 2009 season. It was fireworks night, so we got to go on the field to watch the display. Can't complain about getting to walk on a Major League ballfield. The A's are doing the best they can with limited resources, but something must be said. Mount Davis ruined the view of the mountains in the distance, but it didn't ruin a good ballpark, because it never was one.

              The seats in the original grandstand have some pretty bad views. The lower deck is too shallow. There are too many seats that don't face the proper direction. The overly massive foul territory leaves the majority of the seats too far away. Even if the old bleachers had been left in place, this ballpark would still need to be replaced. The construction of Mount Davis only made it more obvious.
              I disagree. To say so takes the original OC out of its context, when it was a better stadium than a significant number of stadiums in the majors. When the Haas family took over the team, they made a significant number of improvements, adding the ivy above the bleachers, fixing the scoreboard (whose malfunctions are a part of Bay Area lore), adding the first hand operated out of town scoreboard in decades in the majors and generally sprucing up the concessions and making the place more colorful.


              If you looked at 1991, what stadiums would be better than the Coliseum? It was an open air, baseball only stadium with natural grass, so it was going to leapfrog a significant amount of stadia based solely on that. Furthermore, most stadiums had large foul territory for today (as an example, Fenway Park's foul territory was considered tiny for the time, when it's about league average today).

              In the AL, Boston, New York, Detroit, Kansas City and Baltimore for sure. Maybe Chicago - though that was the least well-received new stadium in MLB history - and possibly Toronto. Mostly because people were still in awe of its technology, rather than its merits as a baseball stadium. Seattle, Cleveland, Minnesota, Anaheim definitely not, and I think Texas and Milwaukee are in that same class (personally? Milwaukee better, Texas worse). In the NL only Chicago and LA could be classed as clearly superior stadiums.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Bitter Fan View Post
                . . .When the Haas family took over the team, they made a significant number of improvements, adding the ivy above the bleachers, fixing the scoreboard (whose malfunctions are a part of Bay Area lore), adding the first hand operated out of town scoreboard in decades in the majors and generally sprucing up the concessions and making the place more colorful.
                From 1968 until the time I moved away from the Bay Area in 1982, that area above the bleachers had green "ice plant" (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) planted along the inclines above the concret wall for erotion control. Did the Haas family change it to ivy? As for the scoreboard . . . thats too bad . . . I remember in the late 60's when Charlie O. first introduced it costing an astounding (then) one million dollars!

                I agree with anyone who disses the thing uncle Al built it the bleachers stead, but do remember it being as fine a ballpark as a body would take a ballgame in, in it's day. As a kid growing up near Vallejo, when the Giants were out of town . . . we went to see A's games and when the A's were out of town . . .we went to the Stick to see Giants games. Call me crazy, but i dug both venues (sentimental reasons of course) . . . but have to admit in my heart of hearts . . . OAC was a better ballpark hands down.
                Some's basturds, some's ain't, thats the score.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Bitter Fan View Post
                  Hence why the A's didn't draw as well during their playoff runs in the 00s as they had in the late 80s. If you think Mt. Davis didn't have anything to do with that, you're kidding yourself.
                  the east bay is not a mlb-sized market, the bay area is not a two-franchise market. they are an afterthought here, on a radio station that goes off the air at sundown, second fiddle on cable and almost non existent on other media outlets. history shows that when the numbers are good for one franchise it's bad for the other, rarely are both "up" at the same time.
                  in the 80's the a's (as in daze) had ownership that worked on good p.r., local angles (billy martin, rickey henderson) and an up-tempo game which was quite different from the preceding finley years - having a bart station nearby didn't hurt either. charlie had the "baseball" layout and didn't sell the place out much, not even in post-season, his product was winning but he did not have the touch with the customers that the haas group did. the current group fronted by lew-lew is p.r. tone-deaf, penny pinching and their future efforts have been directed elsewhere for so long that they've turned off most of their small market.
                  mt. davis is the least of their problems. may times i'm there, there's more energy from customers beyond the outfield fence than in the entire grandstand.
                  the customers i have talked to there want is some possibility of them staying and keeping some performers.
                  if you're watching the game, what's beyond the outfield disappears from notice.
                  the turd in the punchbowl
                  reality really sucks.
                  enjoy the game more...

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Paul W View Post
                    there's more energy from customers beyond the outfield fence than in the entire grandstand
                    It's the Latin presence w/ their horns, etc. The outfield patrons were one of the first things I noticed on that quiet August night I visited in 1998. It's MLBs last bastion of blue collar fandom.

                    Comment


                    • One word comes to mind....circular

                      From Ballparks Then & Now/E. Enders

                      Comment


                      • Could it be Goodbye to Oakland A's and Tampa Bay Rays?

                        This could be posted under either Oakland or Tampa Bay. It could also be part of the LA Dodgers or NY Mets. This is a story from the Mercury News and it repeats rumors that the A's and Rays are contracted, and the A's owner purchases the Dodgers and the Rays owner purchases the Mets:

                        Monte Poole: Dirty gossip percolating of possible Oakland A's, Tampa Bay Rays contraction

                        By Monte Poole

                        Bay Area News Group
                        Posted: 03/26/2011 07:46:20 PM PDT
                        Updated: 03/26/2011 10:20:04 PM PDT

                        As the A's vacate Arizona and head back to the home they want to abandon, their fans in the East Bay have moved past anxiety and settled into the drowsy fatigue that comes with two years awaiting reply to a simple question:

                        Is the future in Oakland or San Jose?

                        Meanwhile, there's a nasty whisper circulating about baseball that it might be neither, that the A's could be devoured by their associates.

                        The preferred term is "contraction," a cold concept in any business but especially so if you're among the multitude who have spent some or all of the last 43 years investing your hearts, throats and credit cards in the Oakland club.

                        Though the likelihood of contraction is about the same as that of A's manager Bob Geren being replaced by Shooty Babitt, any prolonged gestation period is bound to hatch innuendo and speculation. And, yes, it has been exactly 24 months since commissioner Bud Selig promised a "blue ribbon panel" would evaluate the team's future options.

                        This latest gossip comes with details juicy enough to quench the thirst of anyone seeking a tall glass of conspiracy.

                        According to veteran New York Post baseball columnist Joel Sherman, "a person involved with baseball labor" recently acknowledged that contraction, previously discussed in relation to the Montreal Expos and Minnesota Twins, has been refloated, with the A's and Tampa Bay Rays as candidates.

                        Why the A's and Rays? Because no two franchises have more frequent fantasies of fleeing their ballparks, Selig hates both yards and -- here's where it gets particularly delicious -- he could finagle a soft landing for two owners for whom he has an affinity.

                        In this scenario, A's co-owners Lew Wolff and John Fisher get the Los Angeles Dodgers, with Rays owner Stu Sternberg getting the New York Mets. It's kind of like Jeffrey Loria went from owning the Expos, making them disappear, and getting the Florida Marlins.

                        If there is an owner Selig wants to dump, it's Frank McCourt, whose stewardship of the Dodgers has been by turns bizarre and inept, and whose messy divorce is both a financial beehive and an ongoing embarrassment to the, ahem, sanctity of the sport.

                        If there is an owner whose predicament gnaws at Bud, it's Fred Wilpon of the Mets. The Wilpon family has acute financial losses related to its involvement with the infamous Bernie Madoff, serving a 150-year term for running the granddaddy of all Ponzi schemes.

                        With McCourt as the tack in Bud's loafers and the Wilpons as a constant case of heartburn, it's easy to imagine Selig nudging them toward the same door through which the minority owners of the old Expos were tossed. Bud would be happier, healthier and more willing to embrace retirement when his term ends after the 2012 season.

                        It would be a win for Selig, a win for his old frat brother Wolff -- or as Bud refers to him, "Lewie" -- and a win for Sternberg.

                        Furthermore, this would complete a rout by the Giants, who stridently and consistently have defended San Jose as their turf and surely would recognize and exploit the advantages of a local baseball monopoly.

                        It's victories all around -- except for baseball fans in the Bay Area, A's fans in particular, and fans in the Tampa-St. Petersburg metro area. Has there ever been the slightest indication Selig gives a hoot about them?

                        There is this view among certain owners outside Oakland and Tampa Bay that through revenue sharing they are subsidizing the A's, Rays and several other franchises where too many seats sit vacant.

                        "The A's are hamstrung by the situation," one source told AOL FanHouse during the winter meetings. "They are always going to be a small-money, small-market team while they are playing in the Coliseum."

                        This conveniently ignores local response to captivating, contending teams at the Oakland Coliseum. Attendance thrived under the Haas ownership and had its moments under Steve Schott and Ken Hofmann before being systematically sheared off by Wolff.

                        The point, however, is Selig and the owners want the A's out of the Coliseum, the Rays out of that homely dome in St. Pete, McCourt out of L.A. and Wilpon out of New York.It's a solution for Bud, pending other considerations.

                        Thankfully for both Bay Areas, other considerations exist. No union in the world is stronger than the MLB Players Association, which wouldn't stand for a proposal eliminating 50 jobs, 25 players from each contracted team.

                        This is not the kind of road down which Selig, monitoring labor strife in the NFL and perhaps the NBA, dares to travel.

                        So we're back to the blue-ribbon committee snoozing indefinitely, San Jose remaining on hold and the A's in Oakland. It's still home, at least for now, perhaps for as long as they exist.

                        Contact Monte Poole at mpoole@bayareanewsgroup.com

                        http://www.mercurynews.com/athletics...nclick_check=1

                        Comment


                        • I think the real issue is that the lease with the cities are almost up, the reason why they talked about the twins who made the playoffs the very next year and not the rays who were consitatntly last when the original contraction talks started. The rays at the time had a pretty long lease left that the mlb did not want to pay off and the the twins had a short lease.

                          I would miss my rays if they were contracted, but I would have 2 people to blame in this situation, the city of st. pete for building this monstrosity of a park so far away from the mass population and the new owners for not wanting to have a serious converstaion with the city of tampa about a new park.
                          The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

                          Comment


                          • If the A's and Rays went away, wouldn't two NL teams have to switch to the AL? Because otherwise the NL would have four more teams than the AL.
                            Last edited by Mr. Laser Beam; 03-29-2011, 02:31 PM.
                            It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed, the hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Mr. Laser Beam View Post
                              If the A's and Rays went away, wouldn't two NL teams have to switch to the AL? Because otherwise the NL would have four more teams than the AL.
                              Makes sense. One obvious choice would be the Brewers to the AL Central and move the Royals back to the AL West. But you'd have to move another team to the NL...hmmm

                              I would choose a team with the least "history" in the NL to move over to the AL, maybe the Dbacks or Rockies.

                              SO say move the Brewers and Rockies/Dbacks to the AL:

                              Put the Rockies/Dbacks in the AL West; the Brewers in the AL Central; move the Royals back to the AL West
                              I see great things in baseball. It's our game - the American game.
                              - Walt Whitman

                              Comment


                              • The Rays aren't going anywhere. That lease is pretty airtight.

                                Comment

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