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  • Originally posted by Chevy114 View Post
    I think you're right hsnterprize, wrigley field and the cubs were built on nothing. Yankee stadium and the yankees won championship after championship every 5 to 10 years so everyone knows them as winners. Yet wrigley did what milkwalkee and detriot couldn't do as much, get their stadium to be a big tourist attraction. I have met women who know nothing about baseball bragging about going to wrigley field, but you wouldn't hear that about other historical stadiums with average teams.

    WGN helped the cubs as much as tbs helped the braves, now they have fans all over the country. And trust me you can tell anytime one of those teams plays your home team!

    So does this mean the real locals of chicago are mostly white sox fans since most of the stadium sounds like is taken up by tourists?
    Wrigley Field is the only ballpark I have been to where hot women go to party. At other ballparks, attractive women generally come to the game with their boyfriends/husbands, but Wrigley girls will throw back Old Style with a bunch of their girlfriends. Who cares if they don't know much about baseball or only go to the ballpark to have fun? Most of them provide better entertainment than the stuff they show on the videoboard between innings.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Lafferty Daniel View Post
      Wrigley Field is the only ballpark I have been to where hot women go to party. At other ballparks, attractive women generally come to the game with their boyfriends/husbands, but Wrigley girls will throw back Old Style with a bunch of their girlfriends. Who cares if they don't know much about baseball or only go to the ballpark to have fun? Most of them provide better entertainment than the stuff they show on the videoboard between innings.
      Hahaha that's so true. Normally I bring a couple every time I go to Wrigley cuz I know they wanna have fun and it's just something they might've never done. Meanwhile, I'm a big Cubs so I watch the game, but also drink like crazy as well.

      I'm in the minority here as a Cubs fan that wants an overhaul/update of Wrigley Field. I love the stadium and all, but you can definately see the wear and tear from all those years. I know they gone through stages of updating it, but they need to do more IMO.

      Also, I don't exactly what else they are going to update or do to wrigley... Can anyone give me a link or tell me exactly what else they're going to do to the stadium? I know the neighborhood is gonna change or they're proposing a part of the place to be rebuilt cuz one of my cousin is an Architect in Chicago and he's proposing a plan for it or was anyway.

      A new stadium (or tear down and rebuild there) wouldn't bother me really as long as they keep the things that defines Wrigley to the new one. The main entrance sign, the scoreboard, the ivy, etc...
      "Back before I injured my hip, I thought going to the gym was for wimps."
      Bo Jackson

      Actually, I think they were about the same because I lettered in all sports, and I was a two-time state decathlon champion.
      Bo Jackson

      My sophomore year I placed 2nd, and my junior and senior year - I got smart and piled up enough points between myself and second place where I didn't have to run the mile.
      Bo Jackson

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Chevy114 View Post
        I think you're right hsnterprize, wrigley field and the cubs were built on nothing. Yankee stadium and the yankees won championship after championship every 5 to 10 years so everyone knows them as winners. Yet wrigley did what milkwalkee and detriot couldn't do as much, get their stadium to be a big tourist attraction. I have met women who know nothing about baseball bragging about going to wrigley field, but you wouldn't hear that about other historical stadiums with average teams.

        WGN helped the cubs as much as tbs helped the braves, now they have fans all over the country. And trust me you can tell anytime one of those teams plays your home team!

        So does this mean the real locals of chicago are mostly white sox fans since most of the stadium sounds like is taken up by tourists?
        To answer your last question, there are more legit Cubs fans than White Sox fans here. The Cubs are more popular than the Sox right now, but that pendulum has often swung over the years. There are true Cubs fans in attendance, however, many people in the stands at Wrigley are there for the status of it. That's not to say there aren't legitimate Cubs fans who care about the team and their performance. It just means that Wrigley Field is a tourist attraction, and there are plenty of people who'll go there for the party atmosphere of the area rather than the game itself.
        Follow me on Facebook, or Twitter.

        sigpic If you love your freedom, thank a vet...and this 10-year U.S. Army vet says, "You're welcome.".

        Comment


        • Originally posted by J.R. View Post
          Ridiculous comment.

          The renovations are coming, and they are needed. But to dismiss the greatness of the park is a classic Sox fanboy move.
          J.R.,

          This "classic Sox fanboy move" comes from plenty of experience both as a fan and as a local sports and news reporter. Maybe you've been drinking too much of the Cubbie Kool-Aid, so sober up and get some knowledge here.

          First of all, there was a time when East Lakeview (the neighborhood currently known as "Wrigleyville") was not as trendy as it is now. In fact, it was a mostly middle- to lower-class, gang infested area that only the die-hard Cubs fans would dare venture into. There were some bars in the area, but not as many as there are now. Murphy's Bleachers and the Cubby Bear have been staples in the neighborhood, but there are places that have only been around for less than 20 years. Why...because of the Cubs' popularity and the subsequent gentrification of the neighborhood.

          There was also a time when the attendance at Wrigley was so poor that the upper deck was sealed off. In other words, you couldn't sit up there because there weren't enough people in the stadium to fill it. Before the Cubs' exposure expansion in the 1980's, only "die hard" fans would go to see games...that was just how bad the team was. Also, there was a time when people who lived across the street from the park could easily grab a lawn chair and a cooler, and sit down and watch the game with no problem. Those days are definitely gone. Now private companies have built seating and buffet areas on rooftops across the street from the park, and are charging top dollar for the "privelege of seeing a game from a rooftop across from Wrigley". The Cubs and the rooftop owners recently reached an agreement where the owners have to pay the Cubs 17% of their gross intake in order to stay in business. Or else, the Cubs will block the view from that rooftop. And the worst part about that is the people who live in the buildings can't even go to the top of their own building and watch the games for free or a discount.

          I won't even go into the whole "nets are up to catch any falling concrete" angle. Considering all the advertising that's going up at Wrigley, I'm suprised those net aren't sponsored by Hanes or some kind of hosiery making company. And I also won't go into the whole attitude of "we sell classic baseball without all the bells and whistles", and yet, the Cubs are not only selling off parts of their ballpark to the highest bidder (like the Bud Light Bleachers, and the Under Armour signage on the outfield doors), but are now in a position where the naming rights of the place could be sold off. I'd guarantee you if it weren't for the political wrangling and uproar, Wrigley's name would've been sold to the highest bidder a long time ago. I'm sorry...I have NO SYMPATHY for anyone who opposes that sale. There's so much wrath about "preserving tradition" and protecting the name. Question...what in the blue hell have the Cubs done over the past 100 years that has earned them the right to "protect the name of Wrigley Field"? Lose pennants...choked away winning opportunities...filled up the place with a bunch of people who might as well be auditioning for "Girls Gone Wild" rather than paying attention to the game? What kind of "tradition" is that? I'm sorry...but the Chicago BEARS have more of a winning tradition at Wrigley Field than the Cubs do. And the Bears left that dump back in the '70's to play at Soldier Field.

          And yes...I called Wrigley Field a "dump". It is an over-rated, over-hyped, faling apart dump. There is a sense of sentimentality there, I agree. Let's face it...when you've played at a place for decades, there's bound to be something built there over the generations. But let's not fool ourselves here...the Cubs...especially in recent years, have been more about filling up Wrigley, and promoting a socially-exciting atmosphere rather than trying to play winning baseball. At least the Red Sox have some winning they can brag about over recent years. Heck, teams like the White Sox, Marlins, Diamonbacks have more winning to brag about than the Cubs do. And don't think just because it's been 100 years since their last World Series title that your team's "due". If they'd earn a championship like other teams have, they'd get a lot more respect. But when there's a lot of crying and whining about "the curse of the Billy Goat" and such, you turn a lot of people off. The "loveable losers" facade is wearing very thin. Sooner or later, Cubs fans eitehr have to hold their team accountable to winning by not showing up at the ballpark, or accept the fate that as they are now, they'll never win...simple as that.

          Sorry for the long rant, but I like to base my comments on fact, and not on "classic Sox fanboy" tactics like you accuse me of. Face it...Wrigley Field, despite all the hype, romanticism, and all the hyperbole, is NOT all that hot. If it weren't for things like the "faux retro" stadium boom of the 90's, Harry Caray's popularity, the rooftops, Tribune Company's ownership, and all the other "virtues" of that place...people wouldn't care about it as much. And if it weren't for Peter Uberroth's intervention in the 80's (according to a Chicago Tribune article I saw linked on this site somewhere), Clark and Addison Streets would be the home to condominiums, and not Wrigley.

          You say Wrigley Field is "great". Granted, it's one of the last of a dying breed of stadia that links people to baseball's past. I say it isn't for the reasons I've stated. And I stand by it...Sox fan or not. Not everyone drinks the Cubbie Kool Aid, my friend. Maybe you should consider drinking more water to quench your thirst...it's a lot cheaper than beer...especially when you're paying $7 for an Old Style at that dump at Clark and Addison streets.
          Follow me on Facebook, or Twitter.

          sigpic If you love your freedom, thank a vet...and this 10-year U.S. Army vet says, "You're welcome.".

          Comment


          • Originally posted by hsnterprize View Post
            And the worst part about that is the people who live in the buildings can't even go to the top of their own building and watch the games for free or a discount.
            That sucks. Big time.
            X
            What's THAT guy doing?
            - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

            Comment


            • whew.... that's more than a "rant". A lot of frustration there...
              "Back before I injured my hip, I thought going to the gym was for wimps."
              Bo Jackson

              Actually, I think they were about the same because I lettered in all sports, and I was a two-time state decathlon champion.
              Bo Jackson

              My sophomore year I placed 2nd, and my junior and senior year - I got smart and piled up enough points between myself and second place where I didn't have to run the mile.
              Bo Jackson

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Gary Dunaier View Post
                That sucks. Big time.
                Yes it would unless your apartment is one of the upper levels then you can see the game from your window... Most of the time you would only see weekend and night games cuz of work during the weekdays, but yeah that has to suck though.
                "Back before I injured my hip, I thought going to the gym was for wimps."
                Bo Jackson

                Actually, I think they were about the same because I lettered in all sports, and I was a two-time state decathlon champion.
                Bo Jackson

                My sophomore year I placed 2nd, and my junior and senior year - I got smart and piled up enough points between myself and second place where I didn't have to run the mile.
                Bo Jackson

                Comment


                • Did they really put up a screen to block the view of the apartments around wrigley?

                  Also I agree if they do tear down wrigley keep the same traditions in the new stadium like the scoreboard, the outside sign, the ivy, and the divisional flags.

                  Cubs fans, how cool is it when the cubs flag is finally on top of the divisional flags?
                  The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by The Splendid Splinter View Post
                    whew.... that's more than a "rant". A lot of frustration there...
                    Sorry...I get kinda mad when the "Cubbie Kool Aid" gets furled my way. Nothing against the real Cubs fans who want their team to win and such...that's fine with me. What gets my goat are those who seem to put out the "Wrigley Field is so wonderful" ideaology, and either don't understand...or don't want to understand why there are people who aren't in agreement with them.

                    I respect that Wrigley is a historic place...let's face it, it's been up for more than 90 years. It's one of the last "bastions" of "old-time baseball" left in this country. That's cool. However, you have to understand that if it weren't for some serious intervention over the years, that place would've been gone a LONG TIME AGO. And it's only in these most recent years that people are starting to get caught up in the hype about how "special" that place is. And more often than not, it can get pretty frustrating.

                    Anyway...enough about Wrigley. The last time I checked, this is supposed to be a thread about U.S. Cellular Field. The White Sox home opener is next week, and they'll be unveiling a special monument/statue honoring Sox fans and the 2005 World Series champions. The Sox will also reveal a statue of long-time Sox player and fan favorite Haold Baines later this season. Pictures will come as the statues are revealed to the public.

                    GO SOX!!!!!
                    Follow me on Facebook, or Twitter.

                    sigpic If you love your freedom, thank a vet...and this 10-year U.S. Army vet says, "You're welcome.".

                    Comment


                    • One more comment about Wrigley...

                      You say that it's frustrating that people have been "caught up in the hype about how 'special' [Wrigley] is," but this isnt' really that recent. I grew up watching a lot of Cubs games on WGN when I was a kid in the late 80's and early 90's and thought that Wrigley was very special then, and this was before I ever attended a game there. I understand that the deep history of Wrigley hasn't been perfect, but the passion for the ballpark has been excellent for the past 20 years.

                      So what's so frustrating about the North Side fans having pride about their great ballpark? What's wrong with the fact that the surrounding neighborhoods compliment Wrigley, making it a prime destination in the summer for serious and casual fans alike?

                      Okay, back to New Comiskey. I haven't been there since the rennovations, but I like what I see from the pictures. If you're only concerned about watching a ballgame then leaving as soon as the game ends, the South Side is for you.

                      Comment


                      • Hey guys, I'm making my first trip to US Cellular next month. Are there any cool bars in the vicinity of the stadium like there are by Wrigley?
                        Not Mommy, not Daddy.....METSIE, METSIE, METSIE.

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by hsnterprize View Post
                          J.R.,

                          This "classic Sox fanboy move" comes from plenty of experience both as a fan and as a local sports and news reporter. Maybe you've been drinking too much of the Cubbie Kool-Aid, so sober up and get some knowledge here.

                          First of all, there was a time when East Lakeview (the neighborhood currently known as "Wrigleyville") was not as trendy as it is now. In fact, it was a mostly middle- to lower-class, gang infested area that only the die-hard Cubs fans would dare venture into. There were some bars in the area, but not as many as there are now. Murphy's Bleachers and the Cubby Bear have been staples in the neighborhood, but there are places that have only been around for less than 20 years. Why...because of the Cubs' popularity and the subsequent gentrification of the neighborhood.

                          There was also a time when the attendance at Wrigley was so poor that the upper deck was sealed off. In other words, you couldn't sit up there because there weren't enough people in the stadium to fill it. Before the Cubs' exposure expansion in the 1980's, only "die hard" fans would go to see games...that was just how bad the team was. Also, there was a time when people who lived across the street from the park could easily grab a lawn chair and a cooler, and sit down and watch the game with no problem. Those days are definitely gone. Now private companies have built seating and buffet areas on rooftops across the street from the park, and are charging top dollar for the "privelege of seeing a game from a rooftop across from Wrigley". The Cubs and the rooftop owners recently reached an agreement where the owners have to pay the Cubs 17% of their gross intake in order to stay in business. Or else, the Cubs will block the view from that rooftop. And the worst part about that is the people who live in the buildings can't even go to the top of their own building and watch the games for free or a discount.

                          I won't even go into the whole "nets are up to catch any falling concrete" angle. Considering all the advertising that's going up at Wrigley, I'm suprised those net aren't sponsored by Hanes or some kind of hosiery making company. And I also won't go into the whole attitude of "we sell classic baseball without all the bells and whistles", and yet, the Cubs are not only selling off parts of their ballpark to the highest bidder (like the Bud Light Bleachers, and the Under Armour signage on the outfield doors), but are now in a position where the naming rights of the place could be sold off. I'd guarantee you if it weren't for the political wrangling and uproar, Wrigley's name would've been sold to the highest bidder a long time ago. I'm sorry...I have NO SYMPATHY for anyone who opposes that sale. There's so much wrath about "preserving tradition" and protecting the name. Question...what in the blue hell have the Cubs done over the past 100 years that has earned them the right to "protect the name of Wrigley Field"? Lose pennants...choked away winning opportunities...filled up the place with a bunch of people who might as well be auditioning for "Girls Gone Wild" rather than paying attention to the game? What kind of "tradition" is that? I'm sorry...but the Chicago BEARS have more of a winning tradition at Wrigley Field than the Cubs do. And the Bears left that dump back in the '70's to play at Soldier Field.

                          And yes...I called Wrigley Field a "dump". It is an over-rated, over-hyped, faling apart dump. There is a sense of sentimentality there, I agree. Let's face it...when you've played at a place for decades, there's bound to be something built there over the generations. But let's not fool ourselves here...the Cubs...especially in recent years, have been more about filling up Wrigley, and promoting a socially-exciting atmosphere rather than trying to play winning baseball. At least the Red Sox have some winning they can brag about over recent years. Heck, teams like the White Sox, Marlins, Diamonbacks have more winning to brag about than the Cubs do. And don't think just because it's been 100 years since their last World Series title that your team's "due". If they'd earn a championship like other teams have, they'd get a lot more respect. But when there's a lot of crying and whining about "the curse of the Billy Goat" and such, you turn a lot of people off. The "loveable losers" facade is wearing very thin. Sooner or later, Cubs fans eitehr have to hold their team accountable to winning by not showing up at the ballpark, or accept the fate that as they are now, they'll never win...simple as that.

                          Sorry for the long rant, but I like to base my comments on fact, and not on "classic Sox fanboy" tactics like you accuse me of. Face it...Wrigley Field, despite all the hype, romanticism, and all the hyperbole, is NOT all that hot. If it weren't for things like the "faux retro" stadium boom of the 90's, Harry Caray's popularity, the rooftops, Tribune Company's ownership, and all the other "virtues" of that place...people wouldn't care about it as much. And if it weren't for Peter Uberroth's intervention in the 80's (according to a Chicago Tribune article I saw linked on this site somewhere), Clark and Addison Streets would be the home to condominiums, and not Wrigley.

                          You say Wrigley Field is "great". Granted, it's one of the last of a dying breed of stadia that links people to baseball's past. I say it isn't for the reasons I've stated. And I stand by it...Sox fan or not. Not everyone drinks the Cubbie Kool Aid, my friend. Maybe you should consider drinking more water to quench your thirst...it's a lot cheaper than beer...especially when you're paying $7 for an Old Style at that dump at Clark and Addison streets.
                          Classic … the Sox guy authors the biggest post in the Cell thread, and it’s all about the Cubs.

                          Wrigley isn’t worshipped as a result of the "faux retro" stadium boom. The new parks were built the way they are because people worship Wrigley.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by hsnterprize View Post
                            Sorry...I get kinda mad when the "Cubbie Kool Aid" gets furled my way. Nothing against the real Cubs fans who want their team to win and such...that's fine with me. What gets my goat are those who seem to put out the "Wrigley Field is so wonderful" ideaology, and either don't understand...or don't want to understand why there are people who aren't in agreement with them.

                            I agree with most of that. I'm one of those fans who wants the Cubs win and watch the game, but since I'm 23 years old... I like to party and have fun as well.

                            I respect that Wrigley is a historic place...let's face it, it's been up for more than 90 years. It's one of the last "bastions" of "old-time baseball" left in this country. That's cool. However, you have to understand that if it weren't for some serious intervention over the years, that place would've been gone a LONG TIME AGO. And it's only in these most recent years that people are starting to get caught up in the hype about how "special" that place is. And more often than not, it can get pretty frustrating.

                            I definately agree with you there. I remember my first game at Wrigley in 1988 when I was 4 and the neighborhood has really changed since. I think it would've been gone around that time if it wasn't for Tribune buying the Cubs. Wrigley is a special place though cuz in the last 20 years, the neighborhood has changed and improved, it's more for younger people to have fun and party, the history of Wrigley and how old is it, "lovable losers", etc.... Now let me make this clear though, while I think Wrigley is special and a great place... I think it's time that it needs a major overhaul, something to the extreme where they tear it down and rebuild at the same spot and maybe buy some land adjacent to it like the proposed expansion plan they had several years back. Keep all the things that defines Wrigley Field that I mentioned before in this thread. I'm one of the minority Cubs fan who wants a radical change even though I love Wrigley Field for what it is.

                            Anyway...enough about Wrigley. The last time I checked, this is supposed to be a thread about U.S. Cellular Field. The White Sox home opener is next week, and they'll be unveiling a special monument/statue honoring Sox fans and the 2005 World Series champions. The Sox will also reveal a statue of long-time Sox player and fan favorite Haold Baines later this season. Pictures will come as the statues are revealed to the public.

                            GO SOX!!!!!
                            Wow... that's great they're doing something for the '05 WS Sox... I'm confused on the Harold Baines statue though. Really??? Harold Baines?? I mean Cubs got Ernie Banks and Harry Carey. Couldn't they find a better one than Baines? I would've rather wait til Frank Thomas retires and build a statue of him. I've been to the Cell both before and after the remodeling. Before I sat in the upper deck and while I could see everything on the field, I didn't feel comfortable sitting up there. Last game I sat in the OF like right-center field about 5 rows up and that was a lot of fun... since it was the Sox-Cubs and the famous Barrett-Pierzynski fight. Overall it's a nice stadium to watch the game really.

                            I hope the Sox does well this season except for when they play the Cubs of course.. :-P
                            Last edited by The Splendid Splinter; 04-03-2008, 05:31 PM.
                            "Back before I injured my hip, I thought going to the gym was for wimps."
                            Bo Jackson

                            Actually, I think they were about the same because I lettered in all sports, and I was a two-time state decathlon champion.
                            Bo Jackson

                            My sophomore year I placed 2nd, and my junior and senior year - I got smart and piled up enough points between myself and second place where I didn't have to run the mile.
                            Bo Jackson

                            Comment


                            • 1. The Wrigley Field grandstand needs to be rebuilt brick by brick over the next ten years. Parts of the grandstand are 94 years old and is getting used harder then ever before. Putting 40,000 people into that grandstand every game takes a greater toll on the structure than the 20,000 or so per game they were averaging 25 years ago.

                              2. What exactly has changed about the actual viewing of baseball at New Comiskey Park? So the seats are green instead of blue, they hacked 7 rows off the top and added a bigger roof. And if you don't want view obstructing poles in the lower level and want to push the upper deck back as a result, then why would you want them in the upper deck?

                              3. All that said, I think the old criticisms of New Comiskey were unfair. That park did break new ground. It was the first new baseball-only park in 18 years, and that alone was a good step. Camden Yards doesn't have seats that are much closer, either. New Comiskey as it was built was still better than Jacobs Field and the Ballpark in Arlington. Jacobs Field looks totally ridiculous, with triple stacked suites and dimensions of a high school field. The Ballpark in Arlington is totally contrived, with crazy angles, the disjointed right field porch, and enormous grandstand.

                              4. I liked the old, deeper, symmetrical dimensions of New Comiskey Park. Asymmetry in a baseball stadium is great as long as it isn't totally contrived. Asymmetry makes sense for Camden Yards, Fenway, the new San Francisco Park (what ever its called), if a stadium is being built to fit into a city or some geographic boundary. It does not make sense when a ballpark is being built on a flat empty plain or parking lot. I hate the new parks in Philadelphia, Texas and other places where this very asymetrical grandstand and field is built in the middle of nowhere. Some great parks were built symetrically, because there was a clean pallet to build on, like Dodger Stadium, Kauffman Stadium, and Old Comiskey. I think many of the new parks are really contrived and use asymmetry and traditional brick to mask a lack of real architectural accomplishment (See new thread). This is part of the reason I never dismissed New Comiskey, even though it had shortcomings.

                              http://www.stadiumdrawings.blogspot.com
                              Last edited by schulzte; 04-03-2008, 05:52 PM.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by soxnut67 View Post
                                That's whre Scott Podsednik hit the gw hr in game 2 of the World Series.

                                and this is the seat that Konerko hit the grand slam in game 2 of the World Series
                                [ATTACH]37639[/ATTACH]
                                Press ‘3′ for new features at the Cell
                                May 28, 2007 at 3:20 pm by Jim Margalus

                                The day after the Cubs-White Sox game, I went to a the Sox-A’s game at U.S. Cellular Field. I went there last year (and the year before, and the year before…), and thus I’ll point to my previous stadium overview post.

                                However, there are a few new things to see and do there:

                                1) All the seats are now green — except two. U.S. Cellular Field featured blue seats in 2005, when the White Sox won the World Series. They gradually replaced all of those, but they left the landing spots for two of the most significant moments of the Series — Scott Podsednik’s game-winning home run in Game 2 (right), and Paul Konerko’s grand slam in Game 2 (below).

                                It’s a nice touch, and the new seats have the welcome addition of back vents, which will help on hot summer days. The seats in left field are the last to see the shade when the sun goes down.



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