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Guaranteed Rate Field / U.S. Cellular Field / Comiskey Park [II]

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  • NickEsasky
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dcGr64mNkOM

    Audio from June 30, 1988 when Gov. Thompson worked the floor to get the bill passed in the State House.

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  • Paul W
    replied
    Originally posted by Matt The Hammer View Post
    Last time I was at New Cominsky - the lack of access between upper and lower decks was an issue. I bought upper deck seats and wanted to go into the OF area to eat and all. Find out that you're prohibited from the rest of the stadium. The Vet was like that in the day - but with the mall park era those restrictions are outdated.

    So like the Vet - you had poor man's entrance to your restricted area and you could only look down at the better stuff below. Lame.
    Welcome to modern MLB. The more you pay the more you get access to, it's been their business plan for decades.

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  • bigworm_122
    replied
    Originally posted by Matt The Hammer View Post
    Last time I was at New Cominsky - the lack of access between upper and lower decks was an issue. I bought upper deck seats and wanted to go into the OF area to eat and all. Find out that you're prohibited from the rest of the stadium. The Vet was like that in the day - but with the mall park era those restrictions are outdated.

    So like the Vet - you had poor man's entrance to your restricted area and you could only look down at the better stuff below. Lame.
    I think that restriction dates back to when the drunk fans attacked the Royals first base coach on the field. I believe that is when that policy came into play. I went there in 2006 and i can't believe that is still the policy.

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  • Steve Jeltz
    replied
    Originally posted by Matt The Hammer View Post
    Last time I was at New Cominsky - the lack of access between upper and lower decks was an issue. I bought upper deck seats and wanted to go into the OF area to eat and all. Find out that you're prohibited from the rest of the stadium. The Vet was like that in the day - but with the mall park era those restrictions are outdated.

    So like the Vet - you had poor man's entrance to your restricted area and you could only look down at the better stuff below. Lame.
    I usually sat in the 700 level at the Vet for plenty of games and never once encountered that.

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  • JoostSuderFain
    replied
    Originally posted by Matt The Hammer View Post
    Last time I was at New Cominsky - the lack of access between upper and lower decks was an issue. I bought upper deck seats and wanted to go into the OF area to eat and all. Find out that you're prohibited from the rest of the stadium. The Vet was like that in the day - but with the mall park era those restrictions are outdated.

    So like the Vet - you had poor man's entrance to your restricted area and you could only look down at the better stuff below. Lame.
    That's odd. I went to the Vet for years and never remember that happening. We'd usually sit in the 500-700 levels a lot, and could always walk down the ramps to the 200 level concourse to get food or something. Yankee Stadium had that, where if you had bleacher seats you couldn't access the rest of the Stadium, but we could always go anywhere within the Vet.

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  • Matt The Hammer
    replied
    Last time I was at New Cominsky - the lack of access between upper and lower decks was an issue. I bought upper deck seats and wanted to go into the OF area to eat and all. Find out that you're prohibited from the rest of the stadium. The Vet was like that in the day - but with the mall park era those restrictions are outdated.

    So like the Vet - you had poor man's entrance to your restricted area and you could only look down at the better stuff below. Lame.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rdGenCub
    replied
    Originally posted by cgcoyne2 View Post
    Visited Guaranteed Rate Field yesterday and thought the place was great except for some minor things. The entrances are strange. You can't go into the Sox Bar and Grill without a ticket then when you're leaving you have to go out then reenter the Park. This caused a problem for my wife. She had to have her ticket scanned 3 times by security and they gave her a hassle. I went into the stadium while she was at the bar and then I couldn't go back to the bar. Very strange. Also, nobody, NOBODY was in the upper deck. There were very few people at the game.
    Sadly unless the White Sox are playing really popular teams such as the Yankees, Guaranteed Rate Field is usually a ghost town. Compared to how it looked when it first opened, Guaranteed Rate Field is a much nicer looking facility today, but it still can't compete with Wrigley Field and the surrounding Wrigleyville neighborhood, especially when it comes to attracting casual fans. The Chisox had several chances to overtake the Cubs in being the most popular team in Chicago (notably from around 1950 - 1966 and then again from around 1974 - 1983), but due to shortsighted owners they blew it. Today, the White Sox are doomed to being an afterthought on the Chicago sports scene. As a Cubs fan with friends and also relatives on my mother's side who supported the Sox for decades, I don't say this to be mean spirited, but just as the unfortunate reality that confronts the fans of the team on the South Side of Chicago.

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  • cgcoyne2
    replied
    Visited Guaranteed Rate Field yesterday and thought the place was great except for some minor things. The entrances are strange. You can't go into the Sox Bar and Grill without a ticket then when you're leaving you have to go out then reenter the Park. This caused a problem for my wife. She had to have her ticket scanned 3 times by security and they gave her a hassle. I went into the stadium while she was at the bar and then I couldn't go back to the bar. Very strange. Also, nobody, NOBODY was in the upper deck. There were very few people at the game.
    Last edited by cgcoyne2; 04-11-2018, 04:43 AM.

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  • Philtration
    replied

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  • Philtration
    replied
    Originally posted by skobabe8 View Post
    Thanks Phil. The only thing I would disagree with is the notion that they can't rebuild and start over. Attendance and TV ratings would not slip much from where they are now, and the core fans would appreciate the change in direction.

    I (and obviously many others) would have loved to see Old Comiskey get completely renovated, but Reinsdorf and company considered that small time. Only a huge modern stadium would do. I would love to see a new ballpark when the Guaranteed Rate deal ends, but that will require the right kind of new ownership and hopefully deep pockets to buy premium land in Chicago. Around McCormick Place would be perfect.
    When I said that they cannot tear it down and start fresh with young talent I did not mean that it could not be done.
    I meant that they can't bring themselves to do it but I did not make myself clear.
    Since my post it looks like they have finally gotten the memo and have gone in that direction.
    They actually did it before and built some very good teams in the 90s.
    I still think the 93 and 94 teams were good enough to win the World Series and maybe even the 2000 team.


    Last edited by Philtration; 09-12-2017, 09:09 AM.

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  • ericlc129
    replied
    Kurosawa; while I respect your opinion, I would never see that happening.

    From an economy perspective, cookie cutters made quite a bit of sense. If you can ensure you have all your events in one location, and save the city/state the burden of detours and additional taxes for two seperate stadiums, why not do cookie cutter? Besides, football and baseball games in those cities were already played in one stadium. The classic stadiums, as they were were NOT going to get upgrades or retrofit suites and videoboards, etc. Urban decay had more to thank for tearing down the classic stadiums than MLB itself.

    AND keep in mind; in professional sports the Golden Rule is What works in one city; will be copycatted ad infinitum. How many stadiums were designed "retro" style once Camden went up?

    The naming rights gives either the team or the stadium/city more money. Which, again; helps with everything from 4K video boards, bars in the concourses, countless amenities within the stadium; the draw of an All Star Game; contracts for a concert or two....many things come from a stupid bank name on a stadium.

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  • Kurosawa
    replied
    Originally posted by Philtration View Post
    The new naming rights deal for the publicly owned stadium is worth $25.1 million but will deliver no additional money to the team, documents associated with the agreement show.
    The White Sox will receive only the remaining value of the original 2003 agreement with U.S. Cellular, which amounts to $20.4 million. The remaining $4.7 million will go to the state agency that serves as landlord of the ballpark, the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority.
    The deal to change the facility's name to Guaranteed Rate Field runs through 2029. If the agreement is extended for a year, the authority would receive $6.4 million in all.
    The amount of money the contract could give to the White Sox was limited by the terms of the team's stadium lease, which state that any additional money received for naming rights after the U.S. Cellular deal "shall be used in the stadium in a manner agreed upon between the team and the authority."

    A crappy name which brings no additional money to the team.
    A lease that does not expire until 2029 in a ballpark that struggles with attendance.
    A team that just cannot tear it down and start fresh with young talent.
    Not that it is a bad stadium but the location just killed them and I wonder what would have happened if they had just renovated Comiskey Park like the Red Sox and Cubs did.
    Baseball completely blew it after most of the classic stadiums were lost in the cookie cutter era. Comiskey, Tigers, Yankee as well as Fenway and Wrigley should have all been protected and all should still be in use. Comiskey and Tigers should have been renovated and Yankee Stadium should have had a renovation and restoration.

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  • Chevy114
    replied
    It looks safer than Wrigley's set up for football

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  • Gary Dunaier
    replied
    Originally posted by ericlc129 View Post
    I apologize, but I couldn't find the "ballparks converted for non baseball game" thread.
    Copied the post into the "Ballparks in Configuration for Football, Hockey, Boxing, etc." thread. But since this is an event that happened at the "Cell," its presence in this thread is also appropriate.

    Leave a comment:


  • ericlc129
    replied
    I apologize, but I couldn't find the "ballparks converted for non baseball game" thread.

    ct-northern-illinois-toledo-sox-park-spt-1110-20161109.jpg

    Comiskey/GRF - Nov 2016; NIU football game.

    Leave a comment:

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