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  • New Mets Ballpark to Echo Ebbets Field

    BY PAUL D. COLFORD
    DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

    Mets owner Fred Wilpon may finally get his Ebbets Field of dreams.
    The design for the Mets' new $600 million stadium will evoke "the look and feel" of the beloved home of the Brooklyn Dodgers, according to a detailed general project plan obtained by the Daily News yesterday.

    Previous efforts to replace Shea Stadium - in 1998, 2001 and last year - also called for Ebbets-like features, but those plans stalled.

    The new proposal received a preliminary green light last month from the board of Empire State Development Corp., the lead agency in the approval process. It will be the subject of a public hearing in Flushing Town Hall on Feb. 27.

    The design scraps the retractable roof in the model of a larger-capacity, multi-use version that Wilpon previously touted.

    In the new proposal, a large "360 Rotunda," as it's described, will be "similar to that of Ebbets Field, at the main entrance behind home plate," and will serve "as a gathering point for pre- and post-game events."

    The new ballpark will have 42,500 seats, compared with Shea's 56,000 - and those seats will be wider and deeper.

    The stadium will also boast more shops and rest rooms

    In left field, the plan says, "a glass-enclosed sit-down restaurant and lounge will be available for season ticket customers."

    Another restaurant, in the upper level behind home plate, will be open to all spectators and fans, according to the plan, which was obtained from the development agency.

    There will also be up to 60 private and party suites, as well as standing room for 1,600 people.

    A portion of the upper deck would be covered by a roof canopy "to add to the feeling of intimacy ... and to provide an additional architectural statement."

    The proposal calls for construction to begin just east of Shea Stadium this summer and be completed by Opening Day 2009, when the Mets' home since 1964 will be torn down to make way for surface parking.

    Most of the cost will be financed by the Mets, with contributions from the city and state.

    Wilpon, who grew up in Brooklyn and was on Lafayette High School's baseball team, has often recalled watching the Dodgers play at Ebbets Field. The park saw its last game in 1957.

    The "design inspirations for the exterior look and feel of the new stadium, including the facade and its detailing, come from the historic Ebbets Field and Hell's Gate Bridge," the new plan says.

    Mets spokesman Jay Horwitz said yesterday the team won't comment on the new design until an upcoming news conference, when it will unveil an image.

    Originally published on February 16, 2006

    http://www.nydailynews.com/front/sto...p-332277c.html
    Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

  • #2
    At Mets' park, you'll think you're in ...Pittsburgh?

    February 12, 2006

    The Mets are staying secretive about their ballpark plans, but Newsday has learned that, in addition to Ebbets Field, the Mets' other main model is Pittsburgh's PNC Park. For those who haven't been there, that's an excellent choice. If the Mets pull this off, they'll go from baseball's worst stadium to one of its best.

    According to a well-placed source, Jeff Wilpon told confidants about PNC Park, "I'd take it in a second if I could." Wilpon or his underlings have toured every new ballpark, but Wilpon is said to love the homey feel of PNC best.

    PNC also is known for its view, tougher for the Mets to duplicate given that they're a few miles from Manhattan, which can be seen only from the upper deck now. One goal is to upgrade Willets Point, which might mean folks needing a chop shop will have to go elsewhere.

    Wilpon declined comment on stadium plans. Sometime in the next month, the Mets will unveil their new park.

    http://www.newsday.com/sports/column...rts-columnists
    Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is what was presented when the Mets Stadium was part of the proposal for the 2012 Olympics. Looks a lot like Ebbets, as has been suggested (after the northern and eastern sections are eliminated post-Olympics). I'm sure the new design will be very similar to what was proposed for the Olympics.

      http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/8368080/

      Comment


      • #4
        They have the future Mets stadium in one of the MLB video games I have. The facade will look like Ebbets, but I'm not sure how much of the actual seating configuration will match.

        Comment


        • #5
          Let's face it, anything would be better than Shea. It has to rank near the bottom of the 24 MLB parks I've been to.
          I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

          Comment


          • #6
            It would be an opportunity for Brooklyn to get a team back if they made it worth the Mets' while to build a new Ebbets Field there.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm more of a fan of this:
              the Mets' other main model is Pittsburgh's PNC Park.
              than this:
              The design for the Mets' new $600 million stadium will evoke "the look and feel" of the beloved home of the Brooklyn Dodgers

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jrh31584
                I'm more of a fan of this:

                than this:
                I'm more a fan of them doing something new, rather than just rehashing the same old tired cliches ad nauseum.

                Here's hoping the new Nats park actually is something new, rather than just another boring design.
                http://www.virtualfenway.com

                Comment


                • #9

                  Latest depiction of Mets'
                  stadium, which is slated for
                  2009 and will include an
                  Ebbets Field-like rotunda at
                  its entrance.


                  Mets can picture this

                  Unveil final rendering of new park

                  VERO BEACH, Fla. - The exterior will bring back memories of Ebbets Field. Capacity will be 45,000 spectators.

                  And now there are pictures of the new Mets stadium, too. Page 39 of the Mets' new media guide includes the first glimpses of the final version of the state-of-the-art, open-air stadium, scheduled to open in 2009.

                  Groundbreaking for the estimated $609 million project is planned for this summer in the parking lot behind Shea's outfield picnic area.

                  "It kind of looks like Camden Yards," Mets infielder Chris Woodward said.

                  Said outfielder Victor Diaz, who said the pictures reminded him of Cincinnati's new park: "It looks nice. I hope I'll be playing in it. The first year it opens it will give us good memories, and hopefully we can win a championship one year in the new ballpark."
                  Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
                  Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
                  THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
                  Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Boring and generic, I cannot believe people are still spending hundreds of millions of dollars on tired Camden Yards ripoffs.

                    The mets and nats could've revolutionized stadium design, but instead are just building the same cliches as everything since 1993.
                    http://www.virtualfenway.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      *yawn* Just like the new Nats stadium, this is going to be boring and generic barring the entrance of the place. The new Mets stadium can echo Ebbets Field all it wants, but it will never replace that ballpark that once stood in Brooklyn.
                      My Top 4 funniest BBF posts ever:

                      1) "plZ dOn;t' pOsT LikE tHIs n e mOr!"

                      2) "The teams play 1962 games in 180 days."

                      3) "Stadiums don't move silly, people do."

                      4) "Once again you quibble, because it is I who speaks."

                      5) Almost anything RuthMayBond says...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sean O
                        Boring and generic, I cannot believe people are still spending hundreds of millions of dollars on tired Camden Yards ripoffs.

                        The mets and nats could've revolutionized stadium design, but instead are just building the same cliches as everything since 1993.
                        I agree completely. PNC Park has come the closest to breaking out of the mold, but since then it's just the "same old same old". Seems like HOK has got a monopoly these days on (cliched) American ballpark design.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Elvis9045
                          I agree completely. PNC Park has come the closest to breaking out of the mold, but since then it's just the "same old same old". Seems like HOK has got a monopoly these days on (cliched) American ballpark design.
                          Which is why you would make a good alternative to HOK. I've seen his ideas so I know.
                          My Top 4 funniest BBF posts ever:

                          1) "plZ dOn;t' pOsT LikE tHIs n e mOr!"

                          2) "The teams play 1962 games in 180 days."

                          3) "Stadiums don't move silly, people do."

                          4) "Once again you quibble, because it is I who speaks."

                          5) Almost anything RuthMayBond says...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            OKs bonds for Yanks' & Mets' stadiums

                            By PAUL D. COLFORD
                            DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

                            The Yankees and Mets scored big in the old bond game yesterday - getting financial boosts from the city to help them build their new back-to-the-future ballparks.
                            The city's Industrial Development Agency gave preliminary approval to the Yankees' bid for $930 million in bonds - including $866 million in tax-exempt financing - to erect a new 54,000-seat stadium in the South Bronx.

                            The Mets - who plan to build a 44,100-seat home just east of Shea Stadium - got the preliminary okay for $632.1 million in bonds. The package includes $527.6 million in tax-exempt bonds.

                            The go-aheads moved both teams closer to opening their 2009 seasons in the new ballparks - and demolishing their out-of-date stadiums. The deals still need City Council approval.

                            The planned stadiums will bring "new jobs and private investment in areas of the city that really need both," development agency Chairman Andrew Alper said after yesterday's meeting.

                            The Yankees plan to build a stadium with a limestone-based exterior, arches and grand entrance echoing the original, pre-1970s renovation of its 83-year-old ballpark.

                            The Mets hope to scrap the badly aging Shea Stadium, which opened in 1964, in favor of an old-style ballpark modeled on Brooklyn's late, lamented Ebbetts Field.

                            The bonds will be repaid by the teams - which will use payments to the city in lieu of taxes - to cover the principal and interest on the tax-exempt financing.

                            The stadium projects will also benefit from millions of dollars in tax exemptions and direct city and state contributions for construction of infrastructure.

                            Yesterday's votes of the Industrial Development Agency board came in a meeting much quieter than the agency's recent stormy public hearing, when comments from 38 people on the Yankees' bond bid stretched the meeting's length to more than 2-1/2 hours.

                            Supporters cheered the Yanks' charitable work and the jobs to be generated by construction and stadium operations.

                            Opponents argued that the successful Yanks didn't needed city assistance, and they protested the loss of 22 acres at John Mullaly and Macombs Dam parks, just north of Yankee Stadium, to make way for the new ballpark.

                            Plans call for the parkland to be replaced in the area.

                            Both teams are hoping to obtain final approvals, including the National Park Service's signoff on converting part of Macombs Dam Park, so they can start building this spring in order to open the new parks by 2009.

                            Originally published on March 15, 2006

                            http://www.nydailynews.com/news/loca...p-338726c.html
                            Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It looks as much like Ebbets Field as the new Yankee Stadium looks like its predecessors. More like (yet another) generic Camden Yards clone. And green seats - how original... Ebbets never had green seats. The old retractable-roof design looked a lot better than this one.
                              Attached Files
                              Last edited by Elvis; 04-03-2006, 10:26 PM.

                              Comment

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