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Yankee Stadium [I] Demolition

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  • Originally posted by StadiumPage View Post
    I was up at YS this morning and took a bunch of pics. Nothing really new to report. Regretfully, the Manhattan bound 4 platform was closed, so I couldn't get any of the real good angles.
    I'm uploading them to the website (www.stadiumpage.com) now, they should be available by 3:30/3:45PM Eastern Time.
    Originally posted by Gary Dunaier View Post
    The upper deck seating sections between 20 and 24 are down. Strangely, the seating sections between 24 and 32 are still standing. Pictures to come, including some night views... be patient and they will come.

    I presume these sections came down yesterday (3/6/10) but it could have happened the day before.
    I just checked out Eric's photos on his website. Because his photos are also from 3/6/10, then the upper deck seating sections between 20 and 24 definitely came down on the 6th, because his photos show those sections still up there.
    X
    What's THAT guy doing?
    - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

    Comment


    • From Today's Daily News:









      Comment


      • Well one thing for sure, this guy was way off the mark on Yankee Stadium, way off.
        Attached Files

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        • Originally posted by Gary Dunaier View Post
          I just checked out Eric's photos on his website. Because his photos are also from 3/6/10, then the upper deck seating sections between 20 and 24 definitely came down on the 6th, because his photos show those sections still up there.
          AARRRGH!!! Too early again! I was there between 11 and 11:30 on the 6th. Good shots again Gary. You're always in the right place at the right time.
          I couldn't even get onto the Manhattan bound 4 track when I was there (closed for some reason).
          StadiumPage.com
          Stadium Google Map

          Comment


          • On second thought, maybe the track was closed to keep people from taking "action" shots and clogging up the platform. I was only at YS for 20 minutes or so, so it could've been done right after I left.
            StadiumPage.com
            Stadium Google Map

            Comment


            • These photographs are of historical proportions. People in 200 years will be looking at them, probably thinking 'what morons'...
              www.demolitionofyankeestadium.com

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              • Originally posted by secret77 View Post
                From Today's Daily News:



                Well, now we know why they are segmenting the upper deck. I'll bet you the upper deck is down by the end of the month.
                Vintage Photos of Detroit Ballparks:
                http://www.flickr.com/photos/doctor_gogol/sets/

                http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/

                Comment


                • Dear Friends,

                  I cannot take credit for finding this. A fellow Baseball Fever member sent it to me. It looks like this is the reason for New York City's stonewalling and obstacles regarding Gate 2. Also, for their total lack of respect towards people who met with them to save Gate 2.

                  -Mike Wagner


                  James P. Stuckey is an award-winning[1] New York City Real Estate Developer credited with the creation and completion of many of the most high profile public/private large scale New York City real estate developments. During the last three decades, he has been considered to be one of the nation's leading public-private developers. Many of Mr. Stuckey's developments have raised the bar in promoting social and economic justice, particularly in inner cities and urban environments. He currently serves as: (1) Divisional Dean, Clinical Professor, and Klara and Larry Silverstein Chair of the NYU Schack Institute of Real Estate; (2) President, Chief Executive Officer, and Founder of Verdant Properties, LLC(R).; and, (3) President of the New York City Public Design Commission.
                  Contents
                  [hide]

                  * 1 Career
                  * 2 Atlantic Yards
                  * 3 Completed Projects
                  * 4 References
                  * 5 Sources

                  [edit] Career

                  Mr. Stuckey is the President, CEO and founder of VERDANT PROPERTIES, LLC(R), a real estate development, ownership, acquisitions and consulting Limited Liability Company. He has over thirty years of public and private development experience, completing many of the most complicated real estate projects in the United States with total values exceeding over $20 billion. Currently, Verdant Properties, LLC is overseeing the development of a $50 million, 132 unit affordable housing project in Flushing, Queens, and several hundred units of affordable and market rate homes in Bridgeport, Connecticut.

                  From January 1994 though June 2007, Mr. Stuckey was responsible for the creation and completion of several billion dollars of highly visible public/private commercial real estate development projects at Forest City Ratner Companies.

                  As President of the Atlantic Yards Development Group, Mr. Stuckey led the development of Atlantic Yards, the proposed new home of the New Jersey Nets Basketball team, 6,430 units of housing and over 600,000 square feet (56,000 m2) of commercial development in the heart of Brooklyn. This $4.0 billion dollar development, being designed by famed architect Frank Gehry, will create affordable and middle income housing, 8 acres (32,000 m2) of open space and thousands of new construction and permanent jobs. Mr. Stuckey had primary responsibility for the overall project, including land acquisition and site assemblage, public and environmental review and approval processes, business negotiations (including government financial incentives), and design and development. He was responsible for overseeing the project’s LEED Certification for Neighborhood Development, a system that integrates the principles of smart growth, urbanism, and green buildings into the first national system of design. He served as the lead negotiator of the project’s historic Community Benefits Agreement.

                  During his tenure at Forest City, Mr. Stuckey also oversaw the development of 15 MetroTech Center South, a 675,000-square-foot (62,700 m2), class A office building, the first to commence construction in New York City after the September 11th tragedy. The anchor tenant for this building, Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield, was the fourth largest former tenant of the World Trade Center. This building commenced construction within 60 days of the tragedy, and was completed for occupancy within eighteen months. In addition, Mr. Stuckey completed a 320,000-square-foot (30,000 m2) transaction with the Bank of New York for new office space constructed above Atlantic Terminal in Downtown Brooklyn. The Bank of New York was also required to relocate in the aftermath of September 11th.

                  Other completed projects at Forest City included 330 Jay Street, a 1,150,000 sq ft (107,000 m2)., 32 story building with court, city agency and commercial office space; Harlem Center, a 150,000-square-foot (14,000 m2), class A office building built above a Forest City Ratner four level retail development; the headquarters and trading floors for the New York Mercantile Exchange; the 42nd Street Retail Development featuring Madame Tussauds and the 25 screen AMC Megaplex; the 460 room Times Square Hilton Hotel; the headquarters for the New York City Fire Department at MetroTech and the 463 room Embassy Suites Hotel and Retail Center at the World Financial Center.

                  Prior to joining Forest City Ratner Companies, Mr. Stuckey was Managing Director at Gronich & Company, overseeing real estate and development advisory services. In this capacity, Mr. Stuckey represented major developers in New York City, Chicago, Boston, Cleveland, Buffalo and Albany and assisted major tenants in their relocation decisions. He negotiated the business transaction for Disney for the restoration of the New Amsterdam Theater on 42nd Street with the City and State of New York. The Theater has been the home of numerous Disney productions (including Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, and Mary Poppins). Mr. Stuckey also represented the Russian Federation and its various organizations and was awarded the 1991 Most Ingenious Deal of the Year Award by the Real Estate Board of New York for the creation of the Russian Trade and Cultural Center at the World Trade Center.

                  Before joining Gronich & Company, Mr. Stuckey served under Mayor Edward I. Koch as President of the New York City Public Development Corporation (currently known as the City’s Economic Development Corporation). In addition to overseeing the day to day operations of this 200 person corporation, he was responsible for implementing in excess of $15 billion in commercial, industrial, and waterfront real estate development projects. Mr. Stuckey played a key role in the development of MetroTech Center, Citibank Center, Times Square Redevelopment, Astoria Motion Picture Studios, the South Street Seaport and the Teleport projects. He oversaw and managed the City’s sixteen industrial and office parks, including the Bathgate, College Point and Staten Island Corporate Parks. Mr. Stuckey redeveloped the Brooklyn Army Terminal into a one million square foot industrial complex, a facility which remains nearly one hundred percent occupied. He assisted in the retention and creation of over 100,000 jobs within New York City, including those associated with Shearson Lehman Hutton, Chase Manhattan Bank, Citibank, Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch, and Goldman Sachs.

                  In 2004, Mr. Stuckey was appointed a Commissioner to the New York City Public Design Commission (formerly the Art Commission of the City of New York) by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and was subsequently elected President of the Commission by his fellow Commissioners in February 2007. He currently serves as a member of Caron New York’s Advisory Board, and as a Governor of St. John’s University’s Board of Governors. Mr. Stuckey has served as a member of the Board of Directors of both the New York City Public Development Corporation and the New York City Financial Services Corporation, and was appointed by Mayor Edward I. Koch and Governor Mario Cuomo to the Westside Task Force. Under Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, he served as a member of the New York City Municipal Water Finance Authority.

                  In addition to these posts, Mr. Stuckey served as Chairman of the Board for the Center Against Domestic Violence, as a Governor of the Real Estate Board of New York’s Board of Governors, and is a current or past member of the Center for Family Life in Sunset Park, the NYC Transit Museum, the Young Presidents' Organization, National Trust for Historic Preservation, National Association of Corporate Real Estate Executives, the Urban Land Institute, and the Council on Urban Economic Development. He also served as Vice Chairman of Community Board 2 in Staten Island, and as a Trustee of the Jacques Marquis Center of Tibetan Art. He is listed in Marquis “Who’s Who in America”. In 1990, he wrote a regular column on business, political and world affairs for the Staten Island Advance, a Bertelsmann Publication, with a circulation of over 80,000.

                  A native New Yorker, Mr. Stuckey received both his Bachelor and Masters' degrees with honors from St. John's University and was listed in Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities. In 2002, Mr. Stuckey completed his second Masters Degree in Sacred Scripture from St. Joseph Seminary’s Institute for Religious Studies. He is a recipient of both the Pietas and President’s Metals from St. John’s University. Mr. Stuckey is an Associate Adjunct Professor at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and regularly lectures at Harvard and Columbia Universities. He has also taught at St. John’s and Yale Universities, John Jay College and Pratt Institute. He and his family currently reside in New York City. He is an accomplished musician, capable of playing ten instruments, and enjoys writing, bicycling, sailing, kayaking, drawing, and golfing.
                  [edit] Atlantic Yards

                  As President of the Atlantic Yards Development Group, Stuckey led the development of Atlantic Yards. Opponents of the project have portrayed the developers as "dollar-oriented," and have mounted a campaign to stop what they characterize as a development that will destroy the neighborhood. Mr. Stuckey says the reason he undertook the project was the opposite, saying "it had to have a public purpose."

                  Designed and overseen by Architect Frank Gehry supporters say the proposed $4.0 billion dollar complex would provide the community 6,430 housing units and the Barclays Center would serve as the future home of the New Jersey Nets Basketball team. Site work began on February 20, 2007. On June 13, 2007 Mr. Stuckey resigned citing a desire to "pursue new challenges."[2]
                  [edit] Completed Projects

                  * Forest City 330 Jay Street – 1,150,000 sq ft (107,000 m2)., 32 story building
                  * MetroTech Center
                  * Harlem Center – a 150,000 sq ft (14,000 m2)., class A Office Building
                  * The 460-room Times Square Hilton Hotel
                  * The 463-room Embassy Suites Hotel & Retail Center at the World Financial Center
                  * Negotiated with Disney the restoration of the New Amsterdam Theater on 42nd Street
                  * Played a key role in the redevelopment of Times Square
                  * Redeveloped the Brooklyn Army Terminal – 1,000,000 sq ft (93,000 m2). industrial complex
                  * A complete listing can be found at http://www.verdantproperties.com




                  Developer James Stuckey Appointed to Lead NYU’s Schack Institute of Real Estate


                  The School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS) recently announced the appointment of James P. Stuckey as divisional dean of the NYU Schack Institute of Real Estate, the University’s home for graduate and continuing professional education and applied research in real estate, construction management, and related fields. Stuckey will also become the new holder of the endowed Klara and Larry Silverstein Chair in Real Estate Development. He succeeds clinical professor D. Kenneth Patton, who steps down as divisional dean and Silverstein Chair this fall, after 11 years.
                  Throughout his 30-plus-year career as a public official and real estate executive, Stuckey has led some of the most complex and storied development in recent New York City history, including Forest City Ratner Company’s Atlantic Yards project in Brooklyn.
                  "Jim Stuckey is an exemplary leader," says SCPS Dean Robert Lapiner. “His lifetime of significant achievement in real estate and regional economic development, in construction management, and urban design seamlessly combined with his lifelong engagement with teaching, public service, and community life embody the academic mission, professional values, and ambitions we have for the NYU Schack Institute of Real Estate.”
                  At age 32, Stuckey was appointed as president of the NYC Public Development Corporation (now the Economic Development Corporation) by then-Mayor Edward Koch. In that role he oversaw more than $15 billion of commercial, industrial, and waterfront development, including the MetroTech Center, the Times Square Redevelopment, and South Street Seaport projects. He also ran the city's 16 industrial and office parks and is credited with creating or retaining 100,000 jobs within New York City.
                  Stuckey then moved into the private sector, first at Gronich & Company, overseeing real estate development and advisory services. While there, his work creating the Russian Trade and Cultural Center at the World Trade Center won the Real Estate Board of New York's "Most Ingenious Deal of the Year Award" in 1991. He then served as executive vice president with Forest City Ratner for 14 years. He most notably headed the firm's $4 billion Atlantic Yards development—a planned basketball arena, housing, and over 600,000 square feet of commercial space—in central Brooklyn, as well as 15 MetroTech South (the first U.S. office building built after September 11th), the 330 Jay Street courthouse complex, the NY Mercantile Exchange headquarters, and the 460-room Times Square Hilton, among many others. He is currently president of the NYC Public Design Commission, appointed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg in 2004.
                  "Today, the real estate industry confronts significant opportunities and challenges on the local, national, and international levels,” says Stuckey. “I fully expect the Schack Institute to continue its leading role in shaping the programs, conducting the applied research, and preparing the future leaders necessary to tackle these critical issues."

                  Comment


                  • Politics, Planning & Development
                    Bloomberg Honors Public Projects for Sustainable Design
                    By Joe Pompeo | Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 5:03 pm
                    in

                    * Bronx River Greenway
                    * Bushwick Inlet Park
                    * Croton Water Treatment Plant
                    * James P. Stuckey
                    * Michael Bloomberg
                    * Public Design Commission

                    <bloomberg_1.jpg>
                    Getty Images

                    The Bronx River Greenway, Croton Water Treatment Plant and Bushwick Inlet Park Community Facility were three of ten public projects Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Public Design Commission President James P. Stuckey honored today at the commission's 27th Annual Awards for Excellence in Design at the New Museum.

                    This year's winning projects, according to a press release Mr. Bloomberg's office just sent out, were chosen because they reflect the city's movement toward sustainability and green design.

                    "These award-winning projects exemplify the ideals of high-quality public design, and prove that public projects can be at once cost-effective, sustainable and beautiful,” the mayor said in a statement.

                    Full press release with the complete list of winners and descriptions of the projects is after the jump.

                    nyfi.observer.com Sep 2, 2009

                    Comment


                    • Those pictures are just so damn depressing, seeing the old girl lose the upper decks. I had lots of good memories at the Stadium and my last game at the old girl was in the upper deck, in a row that was part of the original upper deck rows from 1923. Things will never be the same again. And I hope that Gate 2 will be preserved; to not do so is providing a disservice to Yankee fans and many baseball fans who had great times and memories at the old Stadium.

                      Comment


                      • Sorry for the giant photo, but in it you can see where the cables were attached that pulled down this section of the UD a few minutes (?) later.

                        StadiumPage.com
                        Stadium Google Map

                        Comment


                        • I wonder why they are removing the scaffolding on the Gate 4 pod..... Hopefully after the upper deck is gone, the pods are next to go....

                          Sort of wish they took them down first before touching anything else......

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by doctor_gogol View Post
                            Well, now we know why they are segmenting the upper deck. I'll bet you the upper deck is down by the end of the month.
                            That, my friends, is what happens when a cantilever loses its balance

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Aviator_Frank View Post
                              That, my friends, is what happens when a cantilever loses its balance
                              After getting yanked out of position with considerable force

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by JoeDOYS View Post
                                These photographs are of historical proportions. People in 200 years will be looking at them, probably thinking 'what morons'...

                                Yeah, but now we get Garlic Fries.

                                Comment

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