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  • #46
    Originally posted by Swoboda4 View Post
    "The collective yawn" is a perfect phrase. As loud as Yankee fans can be, I am stunned by the apathy. I still think it gets ugly late. As in; the day demolition is slated to begin, people wake up and near riot. I cannot believe YS will go down easily.
    Anyone who would care, a real baseball fan, recognizes that the fight was lost 30 years ago.

    The old Stadium is lost forever. Sure, I'm sad that the 1970s version is going away, since I have so many memories there, but it's just not the same place as it once was, so trying to preserve what's left just doesn't seem worth it.

    Comment


    • #47
      I guess I can say i'm another Yankee fan living in denial, blinded by all the false promises this new Stadium has to offer. We all look forward to the new stadium, blithely ignoring our current home, the Home of Champions, the House That Ruth Built, the physical embodiment of this great franchise. Once the luster and exitement wears away at this new place, we will be just stuck with only a mere shell of a stadium that most will not be able to fully experience anyway. This Stadium has been the one constant. It has seen it all, the one shining light in sometimes dark times. It has been a witness to this great game of ours. The house was not just built for Ruth but for the game, the new one built for the $$$. I hope that, like myself, all Yankee fans will be able to experience one last game, one last moment, one last memory, and in this memory, Yankee Stadium will live forever in our hearts.
      sigpic

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      • #48
        Originally posted by dabx View Post
        This is my understanding. Shea will immediately go down after the season ends. They have to do this for the parking. YS will start to go down sometime in the early spring. The reason for the delay is to insure that both teams will have a place to play if their stadiums are not completed on time
        Yup. Also part of the Citi Field concourse and even the Fan Walk are pretty much currently being used as part of Shea as the scoreboards and bullpens.

        Hopefully this won't be done untill Novemeber, rather than early October!

        NY Sports Day Independent Gotham Sports Coverage
        Mets360 Mets Past, Present and Future
        Talking Mets Baseball. A baseball blog with a Mets bias

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Jim Vaz View Post
          I was reading somewhere over the winter that a wrecking ball will not be used or that effective either.

          Basically both stadiums are going to come down piece by piece. You're talking about dozens and dozens of Acetylene cutting units, grapplers, and other heavy equipment dismantling both stadiums piece by piece and the carting off of hundreds of tons of concrete and steel.
          Well put Jim Vaz. If you would like to have perhaps a preview of what will take place and how long it will take . .. check out the photos I took of Mile High in 2002 (Mile High: Demise of Mile High) when it was razed. I'm not sure it will take the entire 2 1/2 months it took Mile High (perhaps even longer?) but it gives one an idea of what it took (in one week increments) to watch it come down.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by YankeeStadium1923 View Post
            Spoken like a true Mets fan.....

            Shea Stadium was good for 3 things:

            The Beatles

            The 2000 World Series Trophy

            and Billy Joel 2008

            Currently superior.....Your in the minority......
            Spoken like a true yankees fan.. arrogant and sophomoric, you may not like Shea but there's no denying it was great. game 6 and 7 in '86 game after 9/11 and fans who are loyal to a generally bad team. I give all the respect to the yankees and Yankee stadium, but at least give some decency to other people.. come on step off of the damn pedestal already . Hey at least our pitcher can successfully run the bases. but seriously, its the last year you have history on us in regard to the stadium so I'll let you slide

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by mets16 View Post
              Spoken like a true yankees fan.. arrogant and sophomoric, you may not like Shea but there's no denying it was great. game 6 and 7 in '86 game after 9/11 and fans who are loyal to a generally bad team. I give all the respect to the yankees and Yankee stadium, but at least give some decency to other people.. come on step off of the damn pedestal already . Hey at least our pitcher can successfully run the bases. but seriously, its the last year you have history on us in regard to the stadium so I'll let you slide

              It's going to be weird, isn't it? When both the Mets and Yankees suit up for the 2009 season NYS will have just as much history as Citi will. Zero.

              Thats until we start building some good history in Citi

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Swoboda4 View Post
                I know all about the parkland and the community. I'm a Met fan, so I don't really care what they do with YS. But I am also a preservationist, and I recognize the cultural and architectural loss the destruction of YS represents. But if Yankee fans don't care, you won't find me in front of any bulldozers. Even Shea is currently superior to YS as it exists today anyway.
                I think i've been pretty vociferous about by dislike that they're tearing down YS, but why should I care if Yankee fans don't? I'm a Mets fan and I bleed Orange & Blue(Black too ) but I think it's just wrong to tear down a piece of American history. I feel the same way about this as I do about Comiskey (Although I didn't pay much attention to that and Tiger Stadium (But to their credit Comerica looks fantasic). And I would express the same ammount of disdain if they even tryed to take down Fenway or Wrigley, even though I think Red Sox or Cubs fans would never let that happen. Just as I though Yankee fans would never let YS be torn down, but I was wrong. From what i've seen and heard the majority Yankee fans lack the passion to have stopped it from the beginning.

                Like you said before, it's hard for me to care when most Yankee fans don't even care that they are destroying a huge piece of their history and a piece of baseball history.

                You can tell there are Yankee fans out there that are jealous that the Red Sox get to keep their old time gem with the history thats father & son have been going to since 1912. I see some Yankee fans now are pushing that the Red Sox should get a new stadium for more revenue and yada yada...My question to them is always you do you care and why do you want your biggest rival to get more money? And usually they never have an answer back. They're jealous. As they should be.

                Damn shame.
                Last edited by GreekGuy87; 06-17-2008, 05:09 AM.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by mets16 View Post
                  Spoken like a true yankees fan.. arrogant and sophomoric, you may not like Shea but there's no denying it was great. game 6 and 7 in '86 game after 9/11 and fans who are loyal to a generally bad team. I give all the respect to the yankees and Yankee stadium, but at least give some decency to other people.. come on step off of the damn pedestal already . Hey at least our pitcher can successfully run the bases. but seriously, its the last year you have history on us in regard to the stadium so I'll let you slide
                  Yeah, the Mets being from the NL with no DH rule.... Stating the obvious, like saying Dwyane Wade can shoot FTs better than Shaq.
                  http://lh5.ggpht.com/_Q_Zerpnj63I/Sa...flbot-qUQb.jpg

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Yankees2k6 View Post
                    Yeah, the Mets being from the NL with no DH rule.... Stating the obvious, like saying Dwyane Wade can shoot FTs better than Shaq.
                    dude it's running

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      I'm a Yankee fan and I want Yankee Stadium to be demolished. If they're not going to play games in it, nobody else should.

                      Viva New Yankee Stadium!
                      Bats, they are sick. I cannot hit curveball. Straightball I hit it very much. Curveball, bats are afraid. I ask Jobu to come, take fear from bats. I offer him cigar, and rum. He will come.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by GreekGuy87 View Post
                        I think i've been pretty vociferous about by dislike that they're tearing down YS, but why should I care if Yankee fans don't? I'm a Mets fan and I bleed Orange & Blue(Black too ) but I think it's just wrong to tear down a piece of American history. I feel the same way about this as I do about Comiskey (Although I didn't pay much attention to that and Tiger Stadium (But to their credit Comerica looks fantasic). And I would express the same ammount of disdain if they even tryed to take down Fenway or Wrigley, even though I think Red Sox or Cubs fans would never let that happen. Just as I though Yankee fans would never let YS be torn down, but I was wrong. From what i've seen and heard the majority Yankee fans lack the passion to have stopped it from the beginning.

                        Like you said before, it's hard for me to care when most Yankee fans don't even care that they are destroying a huge piece of their history and a piece of baseball history.

                        You can tell there are Yankee fans out there that are jealous that the Red Sox get to keep their old time gem with the history thats father & son have been going to since 1912. I see some Yankee fans now are pushing that the Red Sox should get a new stadium for more revenue and yada yada...My question to them is always you do you care and why do you want your biggest rival to get more money? And usually they never have an answer back. They're jealous. As they should be.

                        Damn shame.
                        I'm a huge Yankee fan, and I must say that I have zero jealousy toward the Red Sux and Fenway Park. To be completely honest, I think Fenway is actually quite ugly, and that has nothing to do with what team I root for. I think there is more credence in the fact that Mets fans are jealous of Yankee fans because we get to root for a far superior team with a lot more history, and of course, 24 more World Series titles. Yankee fans cannot, by that fact, be jealous of any sports franchise in the world.
                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          The finality of it is setting in after I caught a spot about this on CNN this morning. I'll try not to ramble and take too much of your space and time...and I really do apologize in advance if I can't live up to that promise, entirely. I'm just feeling kinda hurt (that wistful hurt that I can't quite wrap my mind around, so it's hanging on until its good and ready to go). So I tried to find somewhere I could spill for a bit...where it'd be relevant and maybe even okay to get blue in the face of this inevitability h

                          I was born, raised and still presently live in Phoenix, Arizona. I've never even been to Yankee Stadium -- never experienced that feeling, or known what it must feel like to walk through the turnstile for the first time. But the surreality of Yankee Stadium and everything it has silently watched, inspired and quite literally stands (very tall) for...well it's spanned 2500 miles, for me, sight unseen. I think that speaks something for the expanse of its iconic allure. It's sandwiched right in there among everything I've ever known. I am an American. I live in a country that has the Sunset Strip, the Rocky Mountains, Vermont maple syrup, Kansas City BBQ, Delta blues, Cape Canaveral...and Yankee Stadium.

                          And I really don't think I'm alone on that.

                          "The more things change, the more they stay the same..." I can't help but wonder why they couldn't they afford that to Yankee Stadium, warts and all? Nothing will be the same, though. Yankee Stadium will be razed to the ground and become the new locale for several parks and public facilities. I'm a fan of parks and I have a healthy appreciation for the value of public recreation...don't get me wrong. But isn't the historic value worth something? (not the dollars and cents kind of worth, I mean).

                          Naivete Warning: I admit I am thoroughly clueless about the geography around Yankee Stadium aside from some grainy .pdf shots from the internet...so I apologize if my next thoughts seem trite or unrealistic -- and I'm pretty sure they will. I've gotta be oversimplifying at least a dozen angles on this. But, I heard some ideas and they sounded like really good ones...ideas espousing both change and preservation. Conversion of the vast parking lots to municipal parks while the field, concourse and dugouts remain intact. The dugouts for museums, the field for...well, hell -- THE FIELD...and so on. These things sound cost-effective, innovative, sufficiently revenue-generating (and thereby self-funding) and...most importantly...reverent. Reverent to the giant that has seen a nation through tumultuous, crushing and exhiliarating changes. That giant housed the World Series in the aftermath of the crushing blow to our country on 9/11...when Derek Jeter became the first-ever "Mr. November" because of the break in games after 9/11. This isn't just "ancient history" or a nostalgic relic that has outlived its legendary status -- whether a Yankees fan or foe...this is we, us, NOW.

                          (and, yes, I clearly remember the irony that they were playing the Arizona Diamondbacks in that particular World Series -- I freely admit, I was ripped right down the middle...but, in the end -- when the rubber met the road -- yes, I sat in my Arizona living room with my old and tattered, nobody-would-ever-buy-want-or-love-these-old-things-like-I-do baseball card collection spread out on the coffee table, screaming for the Yanks...it's pure speculation, however, that I...a 38 year-old wife and mother of three...was jumping up and down on the couch..."deny, deny, deny")

                          That giant called Yankee Stadium stands as a tangible, solid piece of proof in our ability to stand toe-to-toe with adversity, diversity and terror, stare it in the face and yell "BATTER UP!" Hell, some of the most colorful metaphors in our language were barked into creation from the bottom deck in the bottom of the ninth.

                          And, yeah...I know its time has come. And gone. Damn it. I understand that, when the big wheels start turning, the little wheels can squeak for all the grease they want to squeak for...but it ain't gonna happen.

                          %#@$!!!!!! :grouchy (one of those bottom deck, bottom ninth shouts).

                          Americans endured a world at war...twice. And countless wars and battles...overt, covert, cold ones, hot ones and ones silently simmering...ever since. Through it all, these people carried the memories of their sons and daughters who drew their last breath serving this country into that ballpark with them at some point to let "The Boys of Summer", in turn, carry them to a different, less excruciating, place for awhile. From that to this, we've arrived at a place where silicon chips, hardly viewable with the naked eye, now carry all of us to places we could've never envisioned with even the most uninhibited of imaginations...even bringing some random Arizona chick who has never laid in-person eyes on that inimitable giant inside to crash the party for a little while to lay down a few Sunday thoughts from an aching heart.

                          Sometimes, though, I think those tiny silicon things have enabled us in losing sight of these giant ones (sigh)

                          Americans...as rough and ruddy as we are, the cultural mongrels we've become in this Great Melting Pot, we've survived. We've worn the yoke of hunger, loss, fear and failure -- we've shuddered, bent and bleeding. We've been broken down, but then we broke free...to go watch them break records. We came to watch some baseball.

                          And...regardless of what the scoreboard said at the end of the day, we all won.

                          So how does a symbol of all those things not depart in a slow, painful and lingering way, despite the actual demolition schedule? I know I'll be feeling it for awhile. A long while...I already know it, and it won't be a matter of self-fulfilling prophecy. It'll be true and genuine when I feel that pang some future Sunday afternoon as I tell my grandchildren about this place that used to be.

                          "No, no kids -- there was actually a Yankee Stadium BEFORE this one. Yep, that's right...and the first one was legendary..."

                          For them, I'm going to do my best in the short amount of time left to be able to go on and tell about the time I saw it "back in 2008, right before it was gone...". Facing one hell of a trial schedule over the next five months, my weeks are about to hit the 70, maybe 80-hour range. That leaves me with about one weekend and one "Haaaaaahahahaaaa...you want to do WHAT?!" vacation account that's going to squeak like those wheels I spoke about earlier. But I need to. For my grandchildren, I'll have some meat and potatoes to bring to the story about that giant -- something more than stale, dry facts from something we read or heard. So, for one startlingly-fast weekend, my first trip to New York...my first and last game in Yankees Stadium...I'm going to do exactly that. For them.

                          For me.

                          I couldn't possibly care less where the seat's at or who's playing. I'll have two days and one purpose....to sit down and close my eyes for a moment while my other senses get a chance at soaking it all up, too. Copious photographs of me, then my husband, then...hopefully, with the help of the person who finds him/her-self next to two hasty, nostalgic tourists...a picture of both of us, together.

                          Inside Yankee Stadium.

                          Wow.

                          I'll grab as many souvenirs as I can grab (right down to "My God, Mom...you actually saved your HOT DOG WRAPPER from that day?") for pulling out, some Sunday afternoon, with accompanying threats of severe haunting and curses directed to each and every descendant that might even consider putting them on eBay (and/or whatever's joined eBay by then...). Then, when the game is over, the photo memory sticks are full and I can't sit and stare around me, any longer...when nobody's watching or listening -- I'll look around one more time and whisper,

                          "Hey...thanks for everything."

                          And, then, goodbye.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            We lost Yankee Stadium in 1973

                            From 1976-2008 we had a Yankee Stadium with no frieze, no death valley, no Yankee Stadium letters on the lower exterior wall in front. The time to save Yankee Stadium was 35 years ago. Could you image Wrigley with no ivy or Fenway with no green monster or Old Comiskey with no arched windows? That is Yankee Stadium without the frieze. Plus a majority of the seats are in the upper deck and they are steep. Who wants that?

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Cubs1945 View Post
                              ...Plus a majority of the seats are in the upper deck and they are steep. Who wants that?
                              I do.

                              Who cares how many seats in NYS are on the field level?

                              You'll never be able to afford to sit there.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by Sonnenblume View Post
                                The finality of it is setting in after I caught a spot about this on CNN this morning. I'll try not to ramble and take too much of your space and time...and I really do apologize in advance if I can't live up to that promise, entirely. I'm just feeling kinda hurt (that wistful hurt that I can't quite wrap my mind around, so it's hanging on until its good and ready to go). So I tried to find somewhere I could spill for a bit...where it'd be relevant and maybe even okay to get blue in the face of this inevitability h

                                I was born, raised and still presently live in Phoenix, Arizona. I've never even been to Yankee Stadium -- never experienced that feeling, or known what it must feel like to walk through the turnstile for the first time. But the surreality of Yankee Stadium and everything it has silently watched, inspired and quite literally stands (very tall) for...well it's spanned 2500 miles, for me, sight unseen. I think that speaks something for the expanse of its iconic allure. It's sandwiched right in there among everything I've ever known. I am an American. I live in a country that has the Sunset Strip, the Rocky Mountains, Vermont maple syrup, Kansas City BBQ, Delta blues, Cape Canaveral...and Yankee Stadium.

                                And I really don't think I'm alone on that.

                                "The more things change, the more they stay the same..." I can't help but wonder why they couldn't they afford that to Yankee Stadium, warts and all? Nothing will be the same, though. Yankee Stadium will be razed to the ground and become the new locale for several parks and public facilities. I'm a fan of parks and I have a healthy appreciation for the value of public recreation...don't get me wrong. But isn't the historic value worth something? (not the dollars and cents kind of worth, I mean).

                                Naivete Warning: I admit I am thoroughly clueless about the geography around Yankee Stadium aside from some grainy .pdf shots from the internet...so I apologize if my next thoughts seem trite or unrealistic -- and I'm pretty sure they will. I've gotta be oversimplifying at least a dozen angles on this. But, I heard some ideas and they sounded like really good ones...ideas espousing both change and preservation. Conversion of the vast parking lots to municipal parks while the field, concourse and dugouts remain intact. The dugouts for museums, the field for...well, hell -- THE FIELD...and so on. These things sound cost-effective, innovative, sufficiently revenue-generating (and thereby self-funding) and...most importantly...reverent. Reverent to the giant that has seen a nation through tumultuous, crushing and exhiliarating changes. That giant housed the World Series in the aftermath of the crushing blow to our country on 9/11...when Derek Jeter became the first-ever "Mr. November" because of the break in games after 9/11. This isn't just "ancient history" or a nostalgic relic that has outlived its legendary status -- whether a Yankees fan or foe...this is we, us, NOW.

                                (and, yes, I clearly remember the irony that they were playing the Arizona Diamondbacks in that particular World Series -- I freely admit, I was ripped right down the middle...but, in the end -- when the rubber met the road -- yes, I sat in my Arizona living room with my old and tattered, nobody-would-ever-buy-want-or-love-these-old-things-like-I-do baseball card collection spread out on the coffee table, screaming for the Yanks...it's pure speculation, however, that I...a 38 year-old wife and mother of three...was jumping up and down on the couch..."deny, deny, deny")

                                That giant called Yankee Stadium stands as a tangible, solid piece of proof in our ability to stand toe-to-toe with adversity, diversity and terror, stare it in the face and yell "BATTER UP!" Hell, some of the most colorful metaphors in our language were barked into creation from the bottom deck in the bottom of the ninth.

                                And, yeah...I know its time has come. And gone. Damn it. I understand that, when the big wheels start turning, the little wheels can squeak for all the grease they want to squeak for...but it ain't gonna happen.

                                %#@$!!!!!! :grouchy (one of those bottom deck, bottom ninth shouts).

                                Americans endured a world at war...twice. And countless wars and battles...overt, covert, cold ones, hot ones and ones silently simmering...ever since. Through it all, these people carried the memories of their sons and daughters who drew their last breath serving this country into that ballpark with them at some point to let "The Boys of Summer", in turn, carry them to a different, less excruciating, place for awhile. From that to this, we've arrived at a place where silicon chips, hardly viewable with the naked eye, now carry all of us to places we could've never envisioned with even the most uninhibited of imaginations...even bringing some random Arizona chick who has never laid in-person eyes on that inimitable giant inside to crash the party for a little while to lay down a few Sunday thoughts from an aching heart.

                                Sometimes, though, I think those tiny silicon things have enabled us in losing sight of these giant ones (sigh)

                                Americans...as rough and ruddy as we are, the cultural mongrels we've become in this Great Melting Pot, we've survived. We've worn the yoke of hunger, loss, fear and failure -- we've shuddered, bent and bleeding. We've been broken down, but then we broke free...to go watch them break records. We came to watch some baseball.

                                And...regardless of what the scoreboard said at the end of the day, we all won.

                                So how does a symbol of all those things not depart in a slow, painful and lingering way, despite the actual demolition schedule? I know I'll be feeling it for awhile. A long while...I already know it, and it won't be a matter of self-fulfilling prophecy. It'll be true and genuine when I feel that pang some future Sunday afternoon as I tell my grandchildren about this place that used to be.

                                "No, no kids -- there was actually a Yankee Stadium BEFORE this one. Yep, that's right...and the first one was legendary..."

                                For them, I'm going to do my best in the short amount of time left to be able to go on and tell about the time I saw it "back in 2008, right before it was gone...". Facing one hell of a trial schedule over the next five months, my weeks are about to hit the 70, maybe 80-hour range. That leaves me with about one weekend and one "Haaaaaahahahaaaa...you want to do WHAT?!" vacation account that's going to squeak like those wheels I spoke about earlier. But I need to. For my grandchildren, I'll have some meat and potatoes to bring to the story about that giant -- something more than stale, dry facts from something we read or heard. So, for one startlingly-fast weekend, my first trip to New York...my first and last game in Yankees Stadium...I'm going to do exactly that. For them.

                                For me.

                                I couldn't possibly care less where the seat's at or who's playing. I'll have two days and one purpose....to sit down and close my eyes for a moment while my other senses get a chance at soaking it all up, too. Copious photographs of me, then my husband, then...hopefully, with the help of the person who finds him/her-self next to two hasty, nostalgic tourists...a picture of both of us, together.

                                Inside Yankee Stadium.

                                Wow.

                                I'll grab as many souvenirs as I can grab (right down to "My God, Mom...you actually saved your HOT DOG WRAPPER from that day?") for pulling out, some Sunday afternoon, with accompanying threats of severe haunting and curses directed to each and every descendant that might even consider putting them on eBay (and/or whatever's joined eBay by then...). Then, when the game is over, the photo memory sticks are full and I can't sit and stare around me, any longer...when nobody's watching or listening -- I'll look around one more time and whisper,

                                "Hey...thanks for everything."

                                And, then, goodbye.
                                I do believe when you walk in you'll fall in love with it again.
                                It's a beautiful place just to be in.
                                :gt:gt

                                Comment

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