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  • Remember in DIE HARD how the one guy was attaching bypass wires to the alarm system and the other guy, that dancer dude (Alexander Godunov) just cranked up his chain saw and cut the wires real fast causing the first guy to hurry and he finished just in time.

    They should do that at Old Yankee Stadium. Just have a guy run down the roof with a sawzall and cut all the cables holding the upperdeck in place real fast.

    TIMBER!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    CRASH!!!!!!!!

    Jimmy Dugan: Because there's no crying in baseball. THERE'S NO CRYING IN BASEBALL! No crying! (Tom Hanks, "A League of Their Own" (1992)

    Comment


    • Originally posted by VAPYankees4 View Post
      Ugh Makes me sick. I understand the whole park land thing but god does New York City not remember the history of this stadium. They gotta leave some part of it.
      The more I think about all this, the more and more strange it seems that they just built a "replica" Yankee Stadium right next door to the building it is meant to replicate. I just find it WEIRD. The new stadium's greatness is to be understood as echoing that of the old stadium...which will eventually cease to exist. So, other than photos and memories, there will be no tangible reference for why NYS's aesthetic is what it is.

      I'm not expressing this right...it's just a complicated psychological idea--the eradication of the "original thing" and the substitution of it with something that merely evokes it. To me this kind of thinking can only result in pretensiousness, and I can't shake that feeling about the new stadium, whether it be the watered-down frieze, the gold "Yankee Stadium" lettering on the exterior, the exterior itself, the huge "YANKEE STADIUM" letters over the bleachers (as if we need to be told). There's something insincere about it.

      Part of me feels that if the Yankees really had to vacate the old stadium, they should have moved out of the Bronx and should have gotten a stadium that was of a completely new, innovative design for RIGHT NOW, just as the old stadium was innovative in its own day. That would have been real.

      It also would have kept the original Macombs Dam Park intact and maybe allowed at least for the respectful preservation of the site of OYS as hallowed ground in American History, which is what it is. So many of us have lost the understanding of that in this whole "get it over with and get on with it" attitude. We're talking about a site of tremendous importance in American cultural history here.

      I don't even think that the Yankees organization did a proper sendoff to the old stadium. That last-game ceremony was too full of distracting controversy (Torre, etc.). There should have been a non-game closing ceremony that expressed a solemn acknowledgement of all the history that took place there.

      Another poster expressed the idea that the old stadium WAS the Yankees, and I couldn't agree more. The Yankees franchise and its history were glued together by the old stadium. When the old stadium is gone, this will no longer be the same franchise. Still the Yankees, but no longer the Yankees whose house is YANKEE STADIUM...know what I mean?

      This is why I just can't get into the whole "time to move on" thinking about the new stadium; in my heart and soul something is very troubling about all of this. I don't think we fully understand and appreciate what is being lost here.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by CharlesM View Post
        The more I think about all this, the more and more strange it seems that they just built a "replica" Yankee Stadium right next door to the building it is meant to replicate. I just find it WEIRD...

        I'm not expressing this right...it's just a complicated psychological idea--the eradication of the "original thing" and the substitution of it with something that merely evokes it...
        What you say is correct. It's all about money. The Yankees should have moved to Second Shea (my name for Citi Field) for two or three years and rebuilt Yankee Stadium in the exact same place the old one is. God forbid the Yankees lose a couple bucks to the Mets.

        In case you're wondering, I'm a Yankee fan.
        Jimmy Dugan: Because there's no crying in baseball. THERE'S NO CRYING IN BASEBALL! No crying! (Tom Hanks, "A League of Their Own" (1992)

        Comment


        • Originally posted by cgcoyne2 View Post
          What you say is correct. It's all about money. The Yankees should have moved to Second Shea (my name for Citi Field) for two or three years and rebuilt Yankee Stadium in the exact same place the old one is. God forbid the Yankees lose a couple bucks to the Mets.

          In case you're wondering, I'm a Yankee fan.
          Unfortunately we're in that age when the team is making an eye-popping amount of cash (even in this economy) and would NEVER do the "Shea" thing ever again.

          Like CharlesM said, a big part of this does feel weird and I grew up in the area and all I know is RYS.

          Still, the Yanks wanted a "better" place and the Macombs site was extremely bigger (with 164th street and the tennis center thrown in for the VIP lot) and had to play by the rules and replace the park. It's only fair if that's how things have to be.

          The team didnt want to be like the Red Sox and live in the same place forever when lesser teams get/got better homes and arent even winning (read: Baltimore Orioles). Still, all of this feels bizarre and will feel odd seeing it in person.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by CharlesM View Post
            The more I think about all this, the more and more strange it seems that they just built a "replica" Yankee Stadium right next door to the building it is meant to replicate. I just find it WEIRD. The new stadium's greatness is to be understood as echoing that of the old stadium...which will eventually cease to exist. So, other than photos and memories, there will be no tangible reference for why NYS's aesthetic is what it is.

            I'm not expressing this right...it's just a complicated psychological idea--the eradication of the "original thing" and the substitution of it with something that merely evokes it. To me this kind of thinking can only result in pretensiousness, and I can't shake that feeling about the new stadium, whether it be the watered-down frieze, the gold "Yankee Stadium" lettering on the exterior, the exterior itself, the huge "YANKEE STADIUM" letters over the bleachers (as if we need to be told). There's something insincere about it.

            Part of me feels that if the Yankees really had to vacate the old stadium, they should have moved out of the Bronx and should have gotten a stadium that was of a completely new, innovative design for RIGHT NOW, just as the old stadium was innovative in its own day. That would have been real.

            It also would have kept the original Macombs Dam Park intact and maybe allowed at least for the respectful preservation of the site of OYS as hallowed ground in American History, which is what it is. So many of us have lost the understanding of that in this whole "get it over with and get on with it" attitude. We're talking about a site of tremendous importance in American cultural history here.

            I don't even think that the Yankees organization did a proper sendoff to the old stadium. That last-game ceremony was too full of distracting controversy (Torre, etc.). There should have been a non-game closing ceremony that expressed a solemn acknowledgement of all the history that took place there.

            Another poster expressed the idea that the old stadium WAS the Yankees, and I couldn't agree more. The Yankees franchise and its history were glued together by the old stadium. When the old stadium is gone, this will no longer be the same franchise. Still the Yankees, but no longer the Yankees whose house is YANKEE STADIUM...know what I mean?

            This is why I just can't get into the whole "time to move on" thinking about the new stadium; in my heart and soul something is very troubling about all of this. I don't think we fully understand and appreciate what is being lost here.
            Bingo.
            Yankee Stadium..........just the name says it all......even after the remodel, there was never any doubt as to where you were. We didnt need signs all over it informing us that we were in the House that Ruth Built.

            Comment


            • Obviously it would have been ideal to build the new stadium in the exact location as the old. But there was no way for that to happen. The new stadium is in the Bronx at the same intersection and it looks great. It's fantastic. I loved the original Yankee Stadium and the renovated recent version. I watched this one being built and couldn't wait to see them play there. This one may not be in the same spot but when you look at it, it's Yankee Stadium. It can't get much better than that!

              Comment


              • As much as I want to hold on to OYS/RYS, it is important to remember when it was built, it was built as a place to watch a ballgame and drink a beer or whatever else they were serving in their day. The owner of the NY baseball Giants scoffed at it as a folly. He was wrong and the years and events caused it to become something greater than steel, concrete and grass. We are losing that tangible history now, but the site will remain as community accessible ballfields on which to honor that history. The team remains. The neighborhood remains. We remain. Those sound like the most important elements in which to continue and create more history and legends. Would I have preferred to have stayed in the original? Yes. I have an entire back tattoo portrait of the 1940's era YS with Joe DiMaggio accurate down to the original ads, support columns and frieze accurately displayed. So you can say I love the old place so much I will literally carry it with me forever! I took my 2-1/2 year old daughter there to her first game when she was 8 months old.

                But this year I take my 9 month old son, whose middle name is 'DiMaggio' to the new YS. I'm not being disloyal. There will be sadness. I'm moving on, on to NYS. Let's not be afraid to embrace the future and create memories as special as the old ones, as when my dad took me to my first game in 1980 at RYS.

                Because in 60-70 years, my son will probably take his grandson to his first game across the street at YS 3, likely to be built on the site of YS 1, and it will be right that he should do that and embrace it when that time comes.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by CharlesM View Post
                  The more I think about all this, the more and more strange it seems that they just built a "replica" Yankee Stadium right next door to the building it is meant to replicate. I just find it WEIRD. The new stadium's greatness is to be understood as echoing that of the old stadium...which will eventually cease to exist. So, other than photos and memories, there will be no tangible reference for why NYS's aesthetic is what it is.

                  I'm not expressing this right...it's just a complicated psychological idea--the eradication of the "original thing" and the substitution of it with something that merely evokes it. To me this kind of thinking can only result in pretensiousness, and I can't shake that feeling about the new stadium, whether it be the watered-down frieze, the gold "Yankee Stadium" lettering on the exterior, the exterior itself, the huge "YANKEE STADIUM" letters over the bleachers (as if we need to be told). There's something insincere about it.

                  Part of me feels that if the Yankees really had to vacate the old stadium, they should have moved out of the Bronx and should have gotten a stadium that was of a completely new, innovative design for RIGHT NOW, just as the old stadium was innovative in its own day. That would have been real.

                  It also would have kept the original Macombs Dam Park intact and maybe allowed at least for the respectful preservation of the site of OYS as hallowed ground in American History, which is what it is. So many of us have lost the understanding of that in this whole "get it over with and get on with it" attitude. We're talking about a site of tremendous importance in American cultural history here.

                  I don't even think that the Yankees organization did a proper sendoff to the old stadium. That last-game ceremony was too full of distracting controversy (Torre, etc.). There should have been a non-game closing ceremony that expressed a solemn acknowledgement of all the history that took place there.

                  Another poster expressed the idea that the old stadium WAS the Yankees, and I couldn't agree more. The Yankees franchise and its history were glued together by the old stadium. When the old stadium is gone, this will no longer be the same franchise. Still the Yankees, but no longer the Yankees whose house is YANKEE STADIUM...know what I mean?

                  This is why I just can't get into the whole "time to move on" thinking about the new stadium; in my heart and soul something is very troubling about all of this. I don't think we fully understand and appreciate what is being lost here.
                  Excellent post

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by cgcoyne2 View Post
                    Remember in DIE HARD how the one guy was attaching bypass wires to the alarm system and the other guy, that dancer dude (Alexander Godunov) just cranked up his chain saw and cut the wires real fast causing the first guy to hurry and he finished just in time.

                    They should do that at Old Yankee Stadium. Just have a guy run down the roof with a sawzall and cut all the cables holding the upperdeck in place real fast.

                    TIMBER!!!!!!!!!!!!!


                    CRASH!!!!!!!!

                    Uhhm, hate bust yer bubble buuuut - cutting those cables will not cause the upper-deck to fold forward - at least not immediately. Remember those 10-12 additional rows added in 1975?? They and and the short awning above them with the field lighting ribbon act as a counterbalance to that portion below the addition point(the cantilevered section).

                    That's right, when empty, the upper deck is in a state of static balance. Add 25,000+ fans, and then you've got a problem. The tension cables, attached to a heavy steel ring at the perimeter of the new tier-level concourse added in '75, prevent such forward motion of the grandstand - under load. The whole package is actually stronger and more structurally rigid than what was built by Osborne in 1922! (and would certainly stand up to or even exceed the durability of anything built next door...)

                    So yes, that makes for great cinema, but is not in all reality what will or could happen any time soon, south of 161st St.
                    RYS to NYS: "Obi-Lonn never told you what happened to your father."

                    NYS: "He told me enough. He told me you killed him - in the 1970s!!"

                    RYS: "No, I am your father..."

                    NYS: "No, it's not true, that's impossible!!!!"

                    RYS: "Look beyond my respirator pods and my upper crown; you know it to be true!

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by brooklyndodger14 View Post
                      The bleachers are the simplest Stadium elements in terms of hard structure:

                      Scoreboard: Exterior facing panels, ad panels, matrix boards, wiring, the fascade and flagpoles surrounding a girder frame.

                      Bleachers: Seating and anchors, restroom and commissary facilities, lighting and plumbing. Those can be demolished the quickest.

                      It will be interesting to see how they address the dismantling of the Upper Deck and the removal of the back row extentions and the cabling since there are no more pillars to rely upon as they work.

                      Dennis
                      BrooklynDodger14
                      I'd agree that the bleachers will have to be the first to go before demo on the grandstand starts in order to get truck and crane access to the inside. After that, I'd bet that the field level and loge sections will be torn back to the vertical column/wall that was added during the renovation to act as a fulcrum for the upper deck. Then I'd bet that the roof will be removed. After that, you're guess is as good as mine. They could start tearing back the front rows of the upper deck until the balance begins to make it top heavy, then remove some of the back rows added during the renovation to restore the balance. After that, they can just pick away until they get the the vertical column/wall.
                      Attached Files
                      First Game- Twinight DH, Mets vs. Cards at Shea, August 22, 1965

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by kobathecat View Post
                        As much as I want to hold on to OYS/RYS, it is important to remember when it was built, it was built as a place to watch a ballgame and drink a beer or whatever else they were serving in their day
                        It was about the game and spending time with family/friends. That was about it.

                        Now its a multi-media experience, shopping, a night on the town, gourmet food, entertainment, an amusement park and God knows what else.

                        It almost seems like the game is secondary.

                        I miss the old days where is was simplistic. Just a beer, hot dog, my family or a couple pals watching a game from the $4 bleacher seats. No silly distractions.

                        Major league baseball will never go back to the simplicity. It will never just be a game again. It will be an attraction and experience.
                        Vintage Photos of Detroit Ballparks:
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/doctor_gogol/sets/

                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by CharlesM View Post
                          Another poster expressed the idea that the old stadium WAS the Yankees, and I couldn't agree more. The Yankees franchise and its history were glued together by the old stadium. When the old stadium is gone, this will no longer be the same franchise. Still the Yankees, but no longer the Yankees whose house is YANKEE STADIUM...know what I mean?
                          I feel that way since the Tigers left Tiger stadium. They don't seem like the Tigers anymore. They seem like just a bunch of guys who wear the uniform. As if the team history stopped on the day they moved out. And like the Baltimore Colts, just started again in another city

                          I stopped being a fan. I stopped going to games. Its like the team moved out of the state.
                          Vintage Photos of Detroit Ballparks:
                          http://www.flickr.com/photos/doctor_gogol/sets/

                          http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/

                          Comment


                          • i still think they could preserve dugout to dugout as well as a few other aspects of the stadium and still offer the public parkland at the same time.
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by doctor_gogol View Post
                              It was about the game and spending time with family/friends. That was about it.

                              Now its a multi-media experience, shopping, a night on the town, gourmet food, entertainment, an amusement park and God knows what else.

                              It almost seems like the game is secondary.

                              I miss the old days where is was simplistic. Just a beer, hot dog, my family or a couple pals watching a game from the $4 bleacher seats. No silly distractions.

                              Major league baseball will never go back to the simplicity. It will never just be a game again. It will be an attraction and experience.
                              Can't say I disagree.

                              Comment


                              • If nothing else they should preserve the, what do you call it, the concrete walkway design around the current stadium as well as the blue ticket booths. Even though they may necessarily be the first to go due to the demolition, you would think saveing the entire bleacher/scoreboard/frieze complex could have been accomplished without losing too much of the footprint of the new park, and it could have served functionally as seats for the new ballfields.

                                Comment

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