Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Ballpark Organists

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Captain
    Greetings all:

    First post so be patient.

    I grew up a John Kiley fan playing his Hammond X-66 at Fenway, which I actually played before a game back in 1977 with John's permission. My 15 minutes of fame.

    Anyway, here's what I'm seeking and was wondering if anyone could help me.

    As a kid, I would watch any game I could at Fenway to hear John Kiley play. Unfortunately, there was always talking going on of tv announcers so I could not really hear much of what I wanted. The only time there was no talking so I could here the organist was, "Star Spangled Banner". It was about the first song I ever learned!

    Here's the question. Does anyone know just how I would go about possibly obtaining a copy or two (or three) of some of these old tv broadcasts so I can hear John Kiley play the anthem again. I've thought about contacting the Boston TV folks, but don't know if that's the way to go or not.

    Any suggestions out there are really, really appreciated. Today I play an 3 manual theatre style organ.

    Patrick
    Patrick:

    I'd contact the Bruins first, then WBZ-TV. I think they had the local TV rights before cable came into existence and might have an old tape or two stuck away somewhere......

    Comment


    • #32
      Jane jarvis Shea stadiums "Queen of melody" she was the best!!!! C60

      Comment


      • #33
        I' heard that GABP plays organ music during Sunday games. I have no idea if it's live or recorded. Can someone verify this?

        Comment


        • #34
          What great memories this thread does bring back to a bygone era...

          Of course we no longer hear or see the national anthem on broadcasts or telecasts for the most part....it's good commercial time; every so often say for an opening day we get the anthem sung by some professional singer. At Shea Stadium the usual thing is somebody singing the anthem without any accompanying music.

          Gladys Gooding...on the Brooklyn Dodger forum a year and a half ago or so Dodger Deb dug up a link to an old recording of "Follow the Dodgers" as played by Gladys Godding at Ebbets Field (along with a vocal group singing the words)...brought back weird memories. Also it is quite true that Ms. Gooding sang the National Anthem as well as played it on the organ before Dodger home games.

          After the theft of the Brooklyn franchise, I used to hear her at MSG III when I attended Ranger games. Her repertoire started 15 minutes before the players came out for the warm up (or 45 minutes before the opening face off with the warm up a half hour before the opening face off)...her standard repertoire started with Follow the Dodgers (even though they no longer existed) followed by Dixie...when the Rangers hit the ice for the warm up she played a song known as the Ranger victory song and then, in those days of the 6 team NHL had a song for each of 4 of the remaining 5 teams (she played for Canadiens their themse song as played at the Forum les Canadiens sont la, the Bruins theme song (Paris), for the Red Wings she played I want to go back to that farm, for the Black Hawks it was Chicago, Chicago what a wonderful town...she had nothing for the Leafs who didn't seem to have a theme song at the Gardens)....one day in 1963 I whent to a Ranger game and the whole repertoire weas different...somebody named Virginia Thomas was playing the organ...it turned out Gooding had died that afternoon (BTW in those days when she played the National Anthem they had somebody else sing it...and even when a Canadian team was playing, only the US Anthem was played).

          In 1964, Shea Stadium opened and their original organist was named Jane Jarvis (too bad Gooding had died, wonder if the Mets would have used her...they had no organist when they played at the Polo Grounds, they played canned music)....Jane Jarvis stayed for a while and wrote a song for the Mets to supplement "Meet the Mets" which went something like this, "The New York Mets are on the way, Let's go Mets"..."Three cheers for all the boys that play, let's go Mets".."Each player is a star, (don't remember the rest of the words)...if you ever get a tape of the 1969 World Series you'll hear that song as the Mets took the field.

          It's too bad what goes on now...I can't stand watching Met games on television and listening to that idiotic "Everybody clap your hands" they seem to love.

          But I guess as we all age, we're just not with it anymore....

          Comment


          • #35
            Nancy Faust is heard less and less in Chicago and I know alot of people, including myself, are pretty upset about it.
            www.twitter.com/jasonrosko

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by driver62 View Post
              I' heard that GABP plays organ music during Sunday games. I have no idea if it's live or recorded. Can someone verify this?
              It's live. Jack Doll is the organist at GAB. He used to be the full-time organist at Riverfront Stadium.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Elvis View Post
                It's live. Jack Doll is the organist at GAB. He used to be the full-time organist at Riverfront Stadium.
                Thanks for the info, Elvis. I was sure I read that somewhere but couldn't remember where. Old age fogs my brain every now and then.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Am I the only person who finds the ballpark organ music to be one of those lost baseball traditions that should just stay lost?

                  Occassionally, an organist can be somewhat witty--the one at the Marlins games used to do a "song association" for the names of the visiting batters when they are called up to bat.

                  But for the most part, I just find the organ to be dull, repetitive and unnecessary. If I wanted to hear good organ music, I'll stick with church.

                  Just my opinion. :twocents:

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by PeteU View Post
                    Am I the only person who finds the ballpark organ music to be one of those lost baseball traditions that should just stay lost?
                    .
                    .

                    Yes

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by PeteU View Post
                      Am I the only person who finds the ballpark organ music to be one of those lost baseball traditions that should just stay lost?

                      Occassionally, an organist can be somewhat witty--the one at the Marlins games used to do a "song association" for the names of the visiting batters when they are called up to bat.

                      But for the most part, I just find the organ to be dull, repetitive and unnecessary. If I wanted to hear good organ music, I'll stick with church.

                      Just my opinion. :twocents:
                      I think alot of todays organists do that.
                      www.twitter.com/jasonrosko

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I think that playing recycled ("live") music at ballparks can be borderline copyright infringements. I only hope it can get dropped and organists can come back in full force, because the only music I am growing up is Ernie Hays, and even he's getting time reduced because of the rubbish they play at Busch Stadium. If it's to appeal fans, then it might not appeal the RIAA.

                        The recycled, non-organ version of the "Charge" song they play in AT&T Park and Citizens' Bank Park should be labeled as copyright infringements. Whoever composed that song won't be happy if he/she/they found out people played that version without permission.

                        Okay, I may sound insane, but the "recycled," borderline copyright infringement rubbish has got to go. Wrigley Field is probably the only ballpark today that has a full-time organist without being hampered with the recycled music.

                        Edit: Who was the organist at Yankee Stadium that passed away a couple years ago? I can't think of his name.
                        Solair Wright
                        Cardinals and MLB fan
                        Last edited by Solair Wright; 08-30-2007, 07:20 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Solair Wright View Post
                          Who was the organist at Yankee Stadium that passed away a couple years ago? I can't think of his name.
                          Eddie Layton. He was the first organist at Yankee Stadium, from the time they brought the organ in for the 1967 season. Played for three decades, with a break from 1971-77, retiring at the end of 2003. He chose his successor, Paul Cartier, but despite having a new organ, with all the pre-recorded stuff it is used much less today.


                          Sorry for dredging up this old thread, but I had a bunch of trivia written on scraps of paper that I'm trying to get rid of. Organ music is just part of it.

                          April 26, 1941: Roy Nelson becomes baseball's first organist when he sits down to play at Wrigley Field. (Somebody contact Leo D! He says it was at Ebbets Field in 1938.)

                          Gladys Gooding, who played the organ at Ebbets Field for 15 years, provided a version of "Say It Isn't So" when the last out was recorded there in 1957.

                          John Kiley broke into the "Hallelujah Chorus" when Carlton Fisk hit his dramatic game-winning home run in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series.
                          "Someone asked me if I took steroids. I said, 'No. I had a contract with Wheaties.'"
                          --Bob Feller

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by 2Chance View Post
                            Eddie Layton. He was the first organist at Yankee Stadium, from the time they brought the organ in for the 1967 season. Played for three decades, with a break from 1971-77, retiring at the end of 2003.
                            Here's a CD Yankee fans might be interested in...

                            X

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by 2Chance View Post
                              Eddie Layton. He was the first organist at Yankee Stadium, from the time they brought the organ in for the 1967 season. Played for three decades, with a break from 1971-77, retiring at the end of 2003. He chose his successor, Paul Cartier, but despite having a new organ, with all the pre-recorded stuff it is used much less today.


                              Sorry for dredging up this old thread, but I had a bunch of trivia written on scraps of paper that I'm trying to get rid of. Organ music is just part of it.

                              April 26, 1941: Roy Nelson becomes baseball's first organist when he sits down to play at Wrigley Field. (Somebody contact Leo D! He says it was at Ebbets Field in 1938.)

                              Gladys Gooding, who played the organ at Ebbets Field for 15 years, provided a version of "Say It Isn't So" when the last out was recorded there in 1957.

                              John Kiley broke into the "Hallelujah Chorus" when Carlton Fisk hit his dramatic game-winning home run in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series.
                              Eddie Layton retired?

                              I thought he died.

                              The new guy sounds nothing like him, by the way. Couldnt they just record him playing and when he died/retired, they coulda played the recordings of him instead?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by jimmyjimjimz View Post
                                Eddie Layton retired?

                                I thought he died.

                                The new guy sounds nothing like him, by the way. Couldnt they just record him playing and when he died/retired, they coulda played the recordings of him instead?
                                Jim,Eddie retired then passed away not long after. I like your idea about playing some of his recorded bits. They do it with Robert Merrill and Kate Smith. Considering how infrequently the organ is used, all they would need to do is have a progammer put it on. It's not like it was when Eddie would play something appropriate for the moment at the drop of a hat. I also think they should use Bob Shepard recordings if he ever retires.
                                Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X