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Babe Ruth: 500 Foot Home Runs in MLB Ballparks

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  • I'm new here and I think this is a very interesting topic, but I just don't think it's possible to hit a baseball over 550 feet on the fly. Not even the roided up boys from 20 years ago, under the best conditions can hit it that far. I think 550 feet is the human limit. Three players who I think may have accomplished that are Ruth, Mantle and Frank Howard. I watched all of McGwire's HR in 1998 and he hit some monsters but I'm pretty sure none went over 550 feet. Hitting a baseball 500 feet alone is so spectacular and pretty rare I just can't believe someone could hit it another 50 feet further than that in an official game where the pitcher is trying to get you out. But even under batting practice conditions it would be rare to hit one over 550 feet. I don't think it's possible.

    Even this home run, which is probably the longest one ever hit by anyone in an official game, I don't think went 571 feet. I worked out the geometry and the furthest it could have traveled is about 550 feet. That's if it landed on the far side of Trumbull Street across the street from the pants store. To the furthest end of the pants store, at a manhole cover at the corner of Cherry and Trumbull is about 525 feet from home plate, (where the yellow arrow is pointing on the pic above) so to say it went 45 feet further than that just doesn't seem possible. That would hit a building on the opposite side of the street on the fly.

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    • This photo came up recently at auction, and I thought I'd add it to the thread.

      Auction caption:

      "1920's Aerial photograph of the new Yankee Stadium with artwork added to illustrate a massive home run that had been hit by Babe Ruth on that day. Issued by the International News and stamped on the back, this is a unique piece of baseball history and offered here for the first time ever! More research is needed to determine the exact date this was used but the stamp on back puts this between 1923-1927."

      I'm not sure which Ruth HR was being referenced in the photo, but the aerial image is actually from the 1928 World Series. The photo does have a date stamp on the back of "JUN 12 1945", but it also has that very old International Newsreel stamp as well. Written in pencil is "Babe Ruth home run 500 feet."
      Attached Files
      Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 06-25-2020, 06:24 PM.
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      • One possibility is July 14, 1924.
        "Thank you very much, Commissioner, for the fine introduction. We've got the setting: sunshine, fresh air; we've got the team behind us. So... let's play two! - Ernie Banks, Aug 8, 1977"

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        • View this one full-screen to appreciate how enormous the RF bleachers were:

          50046341737_ebb949a062_h.jpg
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          • Originally posted by SultanOfWhat View Post
            View this one full-screen to appreciate how enormous the RF bleachers were:

            50046341737_ebb949a062_h.jpg
            Wow. I count 62 rows.
            Put it in the books.

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            • I think the actual count was 66 rows. Tough to avoid eye strain counting, but that's the number I get from this crop of a photo taken early in October 1923:

              50046460432_b65d8fe8f4_h.jpg

              The CF bleachers had 25 rows, and the LF bleachers had something like 62 rows.
              Last edited by SultanOfWhat; 06-26-2020, 12:04 AM.
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              • Ruth hit a number of homers deep into the left-center to right-center bleachers, some of them farther than the one in the picture you posted yesterday. If you can find the Jenkinson book on Ruth, I think it covers every one of his long home runs. Somewhere on this website, possibly in the Yankee Stadium volume, there are pictures depicting some of Ruth's longest homers in various parks.
                "Thank you very much, Commissioner, for the fine introduction. We've got the setting: sunshine, fresh air; we've got the team behind us. So... let's play two! - Ernie Banks, Aug 8, 1977"

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                • Actually those illustrations, or some of them, are in this discussion thread. Read from the beginning.
                  "Thank you very much, Commissioner, for the fine introduction. We've got the setting: sunshine, fresh air; we've got the team behind us. So... let's play two! - Ernie Banks, Aug 8, 1977"

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                  • Ruth's longest
                    https://www.baseball-fever.com/forum...foot+home+runs

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