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Yankee Stadium [II]

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  • Mr Laser Beam, let's set the record straight. I'm not a Yankee hater. Been a fan since '68, but whether the team wins it all is not as important to me as it used to be. I am gloating a bit because I expect the 1.5 Billion sparkling palace, King of all Ballparks, to be in pristine condition at all times. It is a year-round destination, is it not? It's not just a baseball stadium, it's a five-star hotel with a ballfield in the middle. That's what we've been told. So what kind of ownership lets their place show flaws like that? Of course NYS is not going anyplace, but that doesn't mean that I have to enjoy it. All the amenities and food choices are nice, but I would be perfectly happy sitting in RYS with a beer and a hot dog. As for the architectural mess that it is, the less said the better. None of this means that I am right or wrong, it's just how I feel about it. And complaining about an overblown, unnecessary steinbrenner folly does not fit the definition of self-pity
    Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

    Comment


    • Originally posted by The Monument View Post
      I am gloating a bit because I expect the 1.5 Billion sparkling palace, King of all Ballparks, to be in pristine condition at all times.
      That is an unrealistic expectation. No building that has ever existed, or ever will exist, is going to be pristine all the time. The ravages OF time will prevent that. Entropy, if you will. Now of course these flaws should be fixed ASAP, but the fact that they are there in the first place is not evidence of any wrongdoing or negligence on the team's part.

      Of course NYS is not going anyplace, but that doesn't mean that I have to enjoy it.
      Actually, it pretty much does. It is the only choice for Yankee home games. Either enjoy it or don't go. It's your choice.

      I would be perfectly happy sitting in RYS with a beer and a hot dog.
      Once they invent time travel, I'm sure that will be possible.
      It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed, the hands acquire shakes, the shakes become a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Mr. Laser Beam View Post
        That is an unrealistic expectation. No building that has ever existed, or ever will exist, is going to be pristine all the time. The ravages OF time will prevent that. Entropy, if you will. Now of course these flaws should be fixed ASAP, but the fact that they are there in the first place is not evidence of any wrongdoing or negligence on the team's part.



        Actually, it pretty much does. It is the only choice for Yankee home games. Either enjoy it or don't go. It's your choice.



        Once they invent time travel, I'm sure that will be possible.


        Just leave him be, Laser..
        I have.
        "We're relying on you to take the memories from this stadium, and add them to the new memories we make at the new Yankee Stadium, and continue to pass them on from generation to generation." Derek Jeter: September 21, 2008.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by DN4L View Post
          Aaaaaaaaah... This is worth posting again, as it is a beautiful shot of this baseball "masterpiece"..
          Four more weeks until I can enter this great palace again!!!



          [/QUOTE]

          This Ballpark is breathtaking! A true Palace! I very much want to see a game there some day. Sure it has some flaws here and there but, over all a fabulous baseball park.
          Last edited by RangerRed; 03-27-2012, 08:13 PM.
          Texas Rangers: Estabalished 1972 (Arlington, Texas)

          Games played at The Ballpark In Arlington (est. 1994)

          World Series Titles: 0 (Damn you David Freese, DAMN YOU!)

          American League Pennants: 2 (2010, 2011)

          American League West Division Titles: 7 (1996, 1998, 1999, 2010, 2011, 2015, 2016)

          American League Wild Card Berths: 1 (2012) (grumble)

          It will always be The Ballpark In Arlington to me

          Comment


          • March 23, 2012

            Bronx merchants: Yankees stadium hurting business

            A 78-year-old liquor store near Yankee Stadium is closing as a result of poor sales and rising rent, but the more interesting part is how other local business owners feel about the new stadium's effects on local spending:

            "It killed business here," said Joe Bastone, owner of the Yankee Tavern, which opened in 1923 and has served the likes of Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio.

            "The first day the stadium opened my food business was down 75 percent," Bastone said, adding that sales have since inched up, but not to their pre-move levels, and only after he lowered prices...

            Once inside the stadium, visitors can choose from 444 souvenir shops, eateries and concession stands — nearly 50 percent more options than in the old stadium. From hot dogs to Cuban sandwiches and sushi, and from pennants to pinstriped jerseys, Yankees fans can find it all without setting foot outside the stadium.

            "Now it's like a mall inside," said Rashed Salahi, an employee at Stadium Souvenirs at the corner of 161st St. and River Ave.

            "You don't see too many people in the street," Salahi added, "They go straight into the stadium."

            If you're wondering why rents are going up when business is going down, the answer is apparently a 2009 rezoning of the 161st Street shopping strip that has so far failed to cause a sea of skyscrapers to sprout up, as promised, but has managed to convince landlords that they should be hiking rents and evicting old tenants because the neighborhood is "hot." Not that we've ever seen that before.

            http://www.fieldofschemes.com/news/a...merchants.html
            Last edited by YankeeStadium1923; 03-26-2012, 06:34 AM.
            Yankee Stadium 1923-2008

            Avid fan of the greatest Stadium ever built! Both in beauty and aesthetics throughout its long Glorious history.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by YankeeStadium1923 View Post
              "It killed business here," said Joe Bastone, owner of the Yankee Tavern, which opened in 1923 and has served the likes of Babe Ruth and Joe DiMaggio.

              "The first day the stadium opened my food business was down 75 percent," Bastone said, adding that sales have since inched up, but not to their pre-move levels, and only after he lowered prices...

              Once inside the stadium, visitors can choose from 444 souvenir shops, eateries and concession stands — nearly 50 percent more options than in the old stadium. From hot dogs to Cuban sandwiches and sushi, and from pennants to pinstriped jerseys, Yankees fans can find it all without setting foot outside the stadium.
              http://www.fieldofschemes.com/news/a...merchants.html




              Sorry Mr Bastone, but your Yankee Tavern (which I used to go into a lot before games at RENOVATED YS) can't hold a candle to the Hard Rock Cafe, a Lobell's Steak Sandwich, a Johnny Rocket milkshake, a mixed drink at the Malibu Terrace Deck, and all the other locations inside NYS that have food and drinks that are much, much, much more delicious than from your old establishment.
              Plus, it puts more money into the Steinbrenner's pockets, which will help them spend more money on free agent players.

              I've said before, and I'll say it again..

              THANK GOD FOR N.Y.S.!!!!!!!

              19 more days until Opening Day at NYS...
              I CAN'T WAIT!!!!!
              "We're relying on you to take the memories from this stadium, and add them to the new memories we make at the new Yankee Stadium, and continue to pass them on from generation to generation." Derek Jeter: September 21, 2008.

              Comment


              • Good article YS1923.

                Its a sad reality of where we are today and I don't see how to remedy it. Let's all realize though that the Yankees like any other business are in it to make money and nothing maximizes their money and their value more than to create a "mall park" as they have. In a free market like we have, no business should be dicated on how they should spend etc, but if they made fare rates it would be nice to see the Yankees maybe allow these small businesses to be part of YS and share in the profits, like having a Stans Shop in the stadium, or having a Yankees Tavern owned or partially owned by a Joe Bastone inside the park.
                Look at it this way though as well, before the new stadium was built, did the small businesses there kick in money to help the Yankees? No. They were there to make money just like anybody else, and money they made hand over fist in an area where they knew they could do so. Now with the Yankees consolidating business into one giant venue, that has all changed and they want to cry about it. I can't fault the Yankees one bit for wanting to make the most money they can. Quite frankly I'm sick of the sob stories. Like life, nothing lasts forever, get over it. So a bar that the Babe used to drink in might close. A LOT of businesses since the time when the Babe was alive to now have come and gone, why should one lousy bar under the el on some street in south Bronx be any different?

                Now the zoning and rent hiking issue, that's a city issue and should be addressed.
                Last edited by Jim Vaz; 03-26-2012, 07:14 AM.

                Comment


                • Have to agree that the NYS food is much better than the Yankee Tavern's. The best thing about the YT is the memorabilia on the walls. The food stinks,as does the bathroom. And since the place where the Babe played ball is gone, I don't care much about saving a place where he drank,belched and farted.
                  Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen,and welcome to Yankee Stadium. Here are the lineups for todays game...

                  Comment


                  • I think every business on and around River Ave. had their chances to refub their shops/bar the second those shovels went into the dirt at the Macombs groundbreaking. When I was in high school, I used to go to the bowling alley across the street from RYS and the place was a bit of a dump and dead last in terms of the city's other bowling alleys. These bars/shops were clearly getting by on Yankee foot traffic alone and didnt adapt once NYS opened its doors.

                    They HAD to know that the new stadium (since it was bigger) was going to be an all-inclusive deal, so they'd have to try to compete on a different level. I cant feel bad that they dragged their feet and now want to complain (like they have been since 09) that the stadium is taking away their sales. Bottom line is that NYS has way more food/beer/drink options and people seem more than willing to drop $9 on a beer and $5 on a hot dog. Just look at the lines for garlic fries and Lobel's.

                    Comment


                    • The success of the facsimile Yankee Stadium is clearly attributable to the attitude of modern NYY fans toward buildings with history - which is to say, they don't care (the clear majority, even preservationists would have to admit). The Tampa firm making a profit on the development there clearly understands the non-sentiment of the New York crowd. What can you do? It's sad. But as Jim Vaz says, life goes on.

                      At least Boston and Chicago have better ideas.
                      Cleon Jones catches a deep fly ball in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Valley of the Ashes, and a second-grader smiles in front of the black and white television.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Strawman View Post
                        The success of the facsimile Yankee Stadium is clearly attributable to the attitude of modern NYY fans toward buildings with history - which is to say, they don't care (the clear majority, even preservationists would have to admit). The Tampa firm making a profit on the development there clearly understands the non-sentiment of the New York crowd. What can you do? It's sad. But as Jim Vaz says, life goes on.

                        At least Boston and Chicago have better ideas.
                        I think its an interesting question to figure out why Fenway and Wrigley are so beloved and will probably not be replaced for quite a whileYankee Stadium is technically in its
                        3rd reincarnation.
                        What are the factors and why?
                        -Is it because both Wrigley and Fenway are quaint ballparks when compared to a cavernous "stadium" style of Yankee Stadium? For instance when you go back, there are still 2 major "ballparks" that are still around while all the old "stadiums" are all gone. Comiskey, Cleveland, Tiger, old YS.
                        -Is it ownership? Was it because of Steinbrenner and his drive to keep the Yankees above all else that the old stadium was eventually replaced?
                        -Was is it the minor changes over time later on that eventually began to work out that kept Wrigley and Fenway around while YS went all out in 1975 and completely rebuilt itself?
                        -Is it the neighborhoods? Bronx is also a neighborhood as well, while ironically most of the area around Fenway now is all businesses. Nobody really lives within an earshot of Fenway.
                        -Is it the Yankees and their world wide fame that puts them under pressure to continually try and stay up on the times and it means sacrificing a once prestigous ballpark for a new mallpark?

                        Besides their quaint charms what sets Wrigley and Fenway I find fascinating. What makes them so special and why to this day are they able to remain in these old parks? Chicago as we all know has 2 teams and Comiskey really went into the ash heap of history with little uproar, while on the North siders would blow tie themselves to the girders and seats before they would allow a wrecking ball to come in.


                        (on a side note, as much hostory that this is with Fenway, I've never really found it that charming, but thats just me)

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Jim Vaz View Post
                          I think its an interesting question to figure out why Fenway and Wrigley are so beloved and will probably not be replaced for quite a whileYankee Stadium is technically in its
                          3rd reincarnation.
                          What are the factors and why?
                          -Is it because both Wrigley and Fenway are quaint ballparks when compared to a cavernous "stadium" style of Yankee Stadium? For instance when you go back, there are still 2 major "ballparks" that are still around while all the old "stadiums" are all gone. Comiskey, Cleveland, Tiger, old YS.
                          -Is it ownership? Was it because of Steinbrenner and his drive to keep the Yankees above all else that the old stadium was eventually replaced?
                          -Was is it the minor changes over time later on that eventually began to work out that kept Wrigley and Fenway around while YS went all out in 1975 and completely rebuilt itself?
                          -Is it the neighborhoods? Bronx is also a neighborhood as well, while ironically most of the area around Fenway now is all businesses. Nobody really lives within an earshot of Fenway.
                          -Is it the Yankees and their world wide fame that puts them under pressure to continually try and stay up on the times and it means sacrificing a once prestigous ballpark for a new mallpark?

                          Besides their quaint charms what sets Wrigley and Fenway I find fascinating. What makes them so special and why to this day are they able to remain in these old parks? Chicago as we all know has 2 teams and Comiskey really went into the ash heap of history with little uproar, while on the North siders would blow tie themselves to the girders and seats before they would allow a wrecking ball to come in.


                          (on a side note, as much hostory that this is with Fenway, I've never really found it that charming, but thats just me)
                          I think the short answer is Steinbrenner and Giuliani, with a side helping of Bloomberg. It's a preservation tragedy, but it's time to move on.
                          Cleon Jones catches a deep fly ball in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Valley of the Ashes, and a second-grader smiles in front of the black and white television.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by Jim Vaz View Post
                            I think its an interesting question to figure out why Fenway and Wrigley are so beloved and will probably not be replaced for quite a whileYankee Stadium is technically in its
                            3rd reincarnation.
                            What are the factors and why?
                            -Is it because both Wrigley and Fenway are quaint ballparks when compared to a cavernous "stadium" style of Yankee Stadium? For instance when you go back, there are still 2 major "ballparks" that are still around while all the old "stadiums" are all gone. Comiskey, Cleveland, Tiger, old YS.
                            -Is it ownership? Was it because of Steinbrenner and his drive to keep the Yankees above all else that the old stadium was eventually replaced?
                            -Was is it the minor changes over time later on that eventually began to work out that kept Wrigley and Fenway around while YS went all out in 1975 and completely rebuilt itself?
                            -Is it the neighborhoods? Bronx is also a neighborhood as well, while ironically most of the area around Fenway now is all businesses. Nobody really lives within an earshot of Fenway.
                            -Is it the Yankees and their world wide fame that puts them under pressure to continually try and stay up on the times and it means sacrificing a once prestigous ballpark for a new mallpark?

                            Besides their quaint charms what sets Wrigley and Fenway I find fascinating. What makes them so special and why to this day are they able to remain in these old parks? Chicago as we all know has 2 teams and Comiskey really went into the ash heap of history with little uproar, while on the North siders would blow tie themselves to the girders and seats before they would allow a wrecking ball to come in.


                            (on a side note, as much hostory that this is with Fenway, I've never really found it that charming, but thats just me)
                            I think it was a combination of luck and having the best stadiums. Luck because owners wanted to get rid of wrigley and fenway in the past, but once they became the last man standing it became clear it wouldn't be right to get rid of them. Had they replaced Fenway or Wrigley before other ones we might still have tiger or Comiskey out of guilt as well.

                            I also thinking having the best stadiums was key because Tiger and Comiskey for example were so big there was too much to maintain and they gave off the impression of being dank and dark for having too much cover and seats all the way around the field. Fenway and Wrigley feel more open making them better to keep alive in today's society.

                            As for Yankee It looked like it was falling apart before the 70s renovation so it felt as if it was almost needed. Then when it came time to get rid of the first Yankee stadium for this place it was renovated taking away from the classic feel and making people not feel as bad for it.
                            The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Chevy114 View Post
                              I think it was a combination of luck and having the best stadiums. Luck because owners wanted to get rid of wrigley and fenway in the past, but once they became the last man standing it became clear it wouldn't be right to get rid of them. Had they replaced Fenway or Wrigley before other ones we might still have tiger or Comiskey out of guilt as well.

                              I also thinking having the best stadiums was key because Tiger and Comiskey for example were so big there was too much to maintain and they gave off the impression of being dank and dark for having too much cover and seats all the way around the field. Fenway and Wrigley feel more open making them better to keep alive in today's society.

                              As for Yankee It looked like it was falling apart before the 70s renovation so it felt as if it was almost needed. Then when it came time to get rid of the first Yankee stadium for this place it was renovated taking away from the classic feel and making people not feel as bad for it.
                              I couldn't agree more. Had the RYS been done better than it was done, maybe it would be standing today.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by YankeeFanBx View Post
                                I couldn't agree more. Had the RYS been done better than it was done, maybe it would be standing today.
                                Not possible. The street grid for the area could not accommodate a building where the inside was expanded to the enormous degree this one was without forcing changes to the roads.

                                Comment

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