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  • #31
    Originally posted by majorleads View Post
    I know. You are missing the point of my original post. I've known about teams dumping tickets on stub hub and craigs list for the past 3 years and talked about this in the Citi Field thread so I posted the above article to show the fans who hadn't realized this practice occurred that they can see an actual team who is involved.
    Dumping tickets on StubHub and dynamic pring are two completely different things. If the Mets are selling on the hub, it is a cloak and dagger operation undercutting the people who buy directly from them. The Giants sell directly from their website using dynamic pricing, just as the Mets and others use tiered pricing. Dynamic pricing is open and upfront, hub-dumping is not

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    • #32
      Originally posted by foulpole View Post
      Dumping tickets on StubHub and dynamic pring are two completely different things. If the Mets are selling on the hub, it is a cloak and dagger operation undercutting the people who buy directly from them. The Giants sell directly from their website using dynamic pricing, just as the Mets and others use tiered pricing. Dynamic pricing is open and upfront, hub-dumping is not
      Excellent point.

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      • #33
        Tickets are dirt cheap and I can't wait to go once the weather warms up. Nothing better then spending a nice day at the ballpark. You can get any game in the upper deck for under 5 bucks. Why would you not go if you love baseball?
        Last edited by dpcv8; 04-19-2011, 01:21 PM.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by johnql View Post
          You just won't let it go, will you? I never said I go mainly for the crab cakes. Since this is an entire thread dedicated to ticketing and concessions, I thought it was relevant to post my experience with the food at COTD. Sorry if that disappoints you.

          As for why any fan would buy season tickets, again, you may find it perplexing but to others there are many good reasons to do so - mainly to guarantee the same seats for the entire season and to have seats that they really like. Not all fans are built alike, but for me being a fan means supporting the team through thick and thin. Clearly, that's not important to you.
          I understand the reasons why someone would purchase season tickets, I am just questioning the wisdom of purchasing them next season when you know you can now get them on Stub Hub for a fraction of the cost.

          Question for you, say we're still rebuilding next offseason and not signing any big names, are you still going to purchase season tickets and if so, how much are you willing to pay per game? Or does cost not matter at all and you'd be OK if they just dropped the price a few dollars? Would you still purchase season tickets if you knew beforehand that they're dropping "tasty crab cakes" from the menu?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by foulpole View Post
            Dumping tickets on StubHub and dynamic pring are two completely different things. If the Mets are selling on the hub, it is a cloak and dagger operation undercutting the people who buy directly from them. The Giants sell directly from their website using dynamic pricing, just as the Mets and others use tiered pricing. Dynamic pricing is open and upfront, hub-dumping is not
            Obviously it's different when you say one does it upfront and one is deceiving. Obviously we know who is doing the deceiving. But thats not the point though. The point was to show the practice of professional teams putting tickets on the open market and selling them for whatever the market allows. This is different than tiered pricing so I have no idea why you brought that up.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by majorleads View Post
              I understand the reasons why someone would purchase season tickets, I am just questioning the wisdom of purchasing them next season when you know you can now get them on Stub Hub for a fraction of the cost.

              Question for you, say we're still rebuilding next offseason and not signing any big names, are you still going to purchase season tickets and if so, how much are you willing to pay per game? Or does cost not matter at all and you'd be OK if they just dropped the price a few dollars? Would you still purchase season tickets if you knew beforehand that they're dropping "tasty crab cakes" from the menu?
              Since I was a season ticket holder for many years at Shea, I think it's obvious that I would still buy season tickets regardless of what food was available at the ballpark. For years at Shea, I bought very little from the concession stands, just the occasional hot dog and soda/beer. I am very pleased that CF offers much better alternatives but it is not even close to a deal-breaker for me.

              As for next year, I would be fine if ticket prices were roughly the same as this year, although a little lower would be preferable. I currently pay slightly less than $50 a ticket (averaged out over 81 games) and I think that price is reasonable for the NY market. Perhaps something closer to $40-45 per ticket on average would be fairer while they rebuild but that's not enough of a difference to dissuade me from renewing. I love my seats and I do not want to go through the hassle of buying tickets game by game at the last minute.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by johnql View Post
                Since I was a season ticket holder for many years at Shea, I think it's obvious that I would still buy season tickets regardless of what food was available at the ballpark. For years at Shea, I bought very little from the concession stands, just the occasional hot dog and soda/beer. I am very pleased that CF offers much better alternatives but it is not even close to a deal-breaker for me.

                As for next year, I would be fine if ticket prices were roughly the same as this year, although a little lower would be preferable. I currently pay slightly less than $50 a ticket (averaged out over 81 games) and I think that price is reasonable for the NY market. Perhaps something closer to $40-45 per ticket on average would be fairer while they rebuild but that's not enough of a difference to dissuade me from renewing. I love my seats and I do not want to go through the hassle of buying tickets game by game at the last minute.
                The food is irrelevant, I was just kidding.

                Alright so I see that you are unique relative to most other fans, seems like convenience is your #1 reason for buying the full season plan as opposed to cost. So I guess it doesn't matter once the season starts and on Stub Hub you see the same seat in lets say sec 123 going for half the price you pay for your ticket. I get it and understand but it would really bother me if I was locked into a full season and see field level box seats by the dugout going for half of what I paid. The way I see it next season if you wanted to you could have some fun and sit in many different sections of the park for much less than what you would pay for ST. Takes 2 minutes online to purchase tickets nowadays so it's not much of an inconvenience if you'd like to save a bunch of money. With the money saved you could treat yourself to the scrumptious Citi surf and turf special every game for an entire season.

                I just go for the game itself and don't pay any attention to all the other distractions that is until I went to my first game at Citi Field. If I was designing a stadium I would get rid of the food court, stacked luxury levels that push back upper level seats and also get rid of the open concourse where fans can walk around and watch the game at the same time. Fans endlessly walking around is my biggest pet peeve.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by majorleads View Post
                  The food is irrelevant, I was just kidding.

                  Alright so I see that you are unique relative to most other fans, seems like convenience is your #1 reason for buying the full season plan as opposed to cost. So I guess it doesn't matter once the season starts and on Stub Hub you see the same seat in lets say sec 123 going for half the price you pay for your ticket. I get it and understand but it would really bother me if I was locked into a full season and see field level box seats by the dugout going for half of what I paid. The way I see it next season if you wanted to you could have some fun and sit in many different sections of the park for much less than what you would pay for ST. Takes 2 minutes online to purchase tickets nowadays so it's not much of an inconvenience if you'd like to save a bunch of money. With the money saved you could treat yourself to the scrumptious Citi surf and turf special every game for an entire season.

                  I just go for the game itself and don't pay any attention to all the other distractions that is until I went to my first game at Citi Field. If I was designing a stadium I would get rid of the food court, stacked luxury levels that push back upper level seats and also get rid of the open concourse where fans can walk around and watch the game at the same time. Fans endlessly walking around is my biggest pet peeve.
                  Yes, convenience is very important to me. Also, having the season plan makes it much easier to plan games with friends and family. We can schedule going to games weeks in advance, something that is much more difficult to do if you're waiting for discount ticket prices (often at the last minute).

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by johnql View Post
                    Since I was a season ticket holder for many years at Shea, I think it's obvious that I would still buy season tickets regardless of what food was available at the ballpark. For years at Shea, I bought very little from the concession stands, just the occasional hot dog and soda/beer. I am very pleased that CF offers much better alternatives but it is not even close to a deal-breaker for me.

                    As for next year, I would be fine if ticket prices were roughly the same as this year, although a little lower would be preferable. I currently pay slightly less than $50 a ticket (averaged out over 81 games) and I think that price is reasonable for the NY market. Perhaps something closer to $40-45 per ticket on average would be fairer while they rebuild but that's not enough of a difference to dissuade me from renewing. I love my seats and I do not want to go through the hassle of buying tickets game by game at the last minute.
                    That is the only part of your post that bothers me. "The NY market" stuff has been an excuse used here to defend the Mets prices since at least 2006 when I joined baseball fever.

                    The Phillies tickets are so much cheaper than Mets tickets, yet they share a large part of the market (the state of NJ). And does anyone think the cost of living is cheaper in Metro Boston than the NY area? I have a friend that relocated to suburban Virginia only to find out that market around Spotsylvania VA was much higher than where she lived in Warwick NY. The Nats charge a lot less than the Mets. I have relatives in Moraga CA, and relatives in Palos Verde CA and their cost of living is much higher than mine, yet Dodgers, Angels, Giants and A's tickets, even Padres too, cost much less than NY.

                    The NY Yankees are 'the NY market' as far as pricing goes. Same with the Knicks and Rangers. The Mets, Isles and Nets are not on that tier. They are all on some "sub tier" where tickets should not be priced as high as the others.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by majorleads View Post
                      Obviously it's different when you say one does it upfront and one is deceiving. Obviously we know who is doing the deceiving. But thats not the point though. The point was to show the practice of professional teams putting tickets on the open market and selling them for whatever the market allows. This is different than tiered pricing so I have no idea why you brought that up.
                      You are claiming that the Mets are flooding the secondary market with heavily discounted tickets. This may be true, and there is evidence to support this claim, but the Giants ARE NOT flooding the secondary market. Their primary sales are based on fluctuating prices, while the Mets primary sales are based on fixed prices. I fail to see how the Giants fluctuating price structure for their primary sales is concrete proof that the Mets are flooding the secondary market.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by mandrake View Post
                        That is the only part of your post that bothers me. "The NY market" stuff has been an excuse used here to defend the Mets prices since at least 2006 when I joined baseball fever.

                        The Phillies tickets are so much cheaper than Mets tickets, yet they share a large part of the market (the state of NJ). And does anyone think the cost of living is cheaper in Metro Boston than the NY area? I have a friend that relocated to suburban Virginia only to find out that market around Spotsylvania VA was much higher than where she lived in Warwick NY. The Nats charge a lot less than the Mets. I have relatives in Moraga CA, and relatives in Palos Verde CA and their cost of living is much higher than mine, yet Dodgers, Angels, Giants and A's tickets, even Padres too, cost much less than NY.

                        The NY Yankees are 'the NY market' as far as pricing goes. Same with the Knicks and Rangers. The Mets, Isles and Nets are not on that tier. They are all on some "sub tier" where tickets should not be priced as high as the others.
                        Both the Yankees and Mets are the NY market, but they're different segments of the same market with the Yankees occupying the upper echelon and the Mets below. Besides, I don't think your numbers are all correct.

                        According to this year's MLB Fan Cost Index (https://www.teammarketing.com/public...11_mlb_fci.pdf), the Phillies are virtually the same cost as the Mets with the average Philly ticket actually higher than the average Mets ticket. This is offset by the Mets having a much higher premium ticket cost vs. the Phillies. Total fan cost is virtually the same.

                        Similarly, the Red Sox cost is very similar to the Yankees and has been for a number of years. Their total cost is much higher than the Mets.

                        The Dodgers are slightly lower than the Mets but not significantly so. Average ticket price is virtually identical to the Mets with the Dodgers premium ticket average much higher than the Mets.

                        The other teams that you mention are definitely lower than the Mets. But what does any of this prove? To me, it means that "the market" goes beyond a simple question of cost of living. I think the market is specific to a fan base. The Mets know they don't have the fan base of the Yankees; therefore, their ticket prices reflect that. They overcharged in 2009 and 2010 and have adjusted accordingly. That's how business works, adjusting to your market.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Just to add a little more to my previous post re: "the market":

                          The more I think about what constitutes the market, I am certain that cost of living is a factor but not a major one. I think it's much more related to the fan base, whether that fan base is really a baseball fan base, for instance. I don't think anyone can dispute the claim that NY is a baseball town and LA really isn't. Everyone knows how their fans often arrive at games late and leave early. Yes, part of it has to do with their horrific traffic but it also reflects the fan base's mentality. Another example: during Atlanta's incredible playoff run of 14 consecutive division titles, it was not that unusual to see plenty of empty seats at Turner Field. Would this ever happen in NY? I think not. Atlanta is much more of a football town. College football is probably more popular than MLB baseball.

                          So...the market goes way beyond a superficial glance at a locality's cost of living. It involves the deep-seated fervor of the fan base. At least that's how I see it.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by johnql View Post
                            Just to add a little more to my previous post re: "the market":

                            The more I think about what constitutes the market, I am certain that cost of living is a factor but not a major one. I think it's much more related to the fan base, whether that fan base is really a baseball fan base, for instance. I don't think anyone can dispute the claim that NY is a baseball town and LA really isn't. Everyone knows how their fans often arrive at games late and leave early. Yes, part of it has to do with their horrific traffic but it also reflects the fan base's mentality. Another example: during Atlanta's incredible playoff run of 14 consecutive division titles, it was not that unusual to see plenty of empty seats at Turner Field. Would this ever happen in NY? I think not. Atlanta is much more of a football town. College football is probably more popular than MLB baseball.

                            So...the market goes way beyond a superficial glance at a locality's cost of living. It involves the deep-seated fervor of the fan base. At least that's how I see it.
                            I would agree with that... The passion of the NY baseball fan goes back many years and generations.:gt:gt:gt:gt:gt

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              The NY Mets are as much the NY market as the NY Islanders have become. Unless you are on a forum like this (or others) then the Mets are really close to being irrelevant to the market as a whole. Mets fans can deny this, but the prices for Mets tickets reflect this.

                              This season, I could get Isles tickets first row behind the bench cheaper than I could get Rangers tickets in the old blue seats, last row behind the goal. With the way things are going, the Mets will have the emptiest 25,000 tickets sold history in MLB history.

                              The Yankees are NYC and have been since 1995. The Mets were on that level at one time, but it will be years before they are a "NY team" again.

                              The average ticket prices for teams like the Phillies are skewed. Their best seats are much cheaper, the upper deck is close in price. Very few teams have $400 tickets like the Mets.

                              I am headed to CA in August when the Mets are in SD. I might see the LAD, LAA, and the Mets in SD. So far, I see prices much cheaper than the Mets box office.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by foulpole View Post
                                You are claiming that the Mets are flooding the secondary market with heavily discounted tickets. This may be true, and there is evidence to support this claim, but the Giants ARE NOT flooding the secondary market. Their primary sales are based on fluctuating prices, while the Mets primary sales are based on fixed prices. I fail to see how the Giants fluctuating price structure for their primary sales is concrete proof that the Mets are flooding the secondary market.
                                Primary or secondary market does not matter, it's the practice itself of selling tickets based on supply and demand in the open market. That practice which is something the Giants do is now what the Mets are engaging in. The whole point is that TEAMS are selling tickets with fluctuating prices, what market it is has no bearing on what I'm talking about. You might be talking about something totally different because quite frankly I have no clue why you care what market it is.

                                Now if you believe that a bunch of poor soles purchased blocks of crappy upper deck season tickets (all while knowing this team was going to be mediocore) hoping to sell them on Stub Hub and would turn a profit, well then I'm speechless.

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