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The Most Dangerous Ballpark to Attend

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  • The Most Dangerous Ballpark to Attend

    Which park was in the most dangerous area?

    My vote goes to Connie Mack Stadium in North Philadelphia at Lehigh and 21st Street.

    I recall reading of bad incidents as early as 1964. How the Philiies survived another 6 years there is curious.

    Even today, N. Philly is a no-go zone, although a large church now sits on the site of the old park.
    Still patiently waiting @ at Sullivan & McKeever (once THE corner in MLB) for the Brooks to return from their extended road trip.

  • #2
    From World War II through the time they moved to Los Angeles, I've read many accounts of how the neighborhood around Ebbets Field had degenerated to the point where many fans virtually feared going to the park. In a single decade, the area had gone from thriving (with the working shipyard, etc.) to fearsome for the fans who wanted to see the Dodgers in person. It's one of the reasons the O'Malley wanted a new park at Atlantic and Flatbush. When Robert Moses said Flushing or nowhere, Walter took up L.A. on its offer, where he wouldn't have to deal with the dictatorial Moses.

    Upper Manhattan had a similar issue with the Giants.

    So, I think my votes would go to Ebbets Field and the Polo Grounds from the early 1950's through the '57 season.
    Put it in the books.

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    • #3
      I read that if Shibe hadn't been guarded during the riots of '64 it would have likely been burned down by the rioters.

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      • #4
        I would vote for the collisuem if the dodgers still played there, the stories I hear about gangs in the 80s and all those riots when the raiders were still there are crazy.

        I heard stories about Ebbets where the local kids would ask people for a dollor 2 to watch their car while it was parked and if people said no they would throw rocks at the car for a few minutes straight.

        How is oakland? Does it just get a bad rep or is it the real deal for shady neighborhoods? The same question for Cleveland was the mistake by the lake in a bad area?
        The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

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        • #5
          The LA gangs hadn't infested the Coliseum area when the Dodgers played there. I went to a game there waaay back in 1958, their first season in LA, and the neighborhood was attractive and safe to walk around in. You're very right that it would be dangerous today. Crosley Field's neighborhood was a horror in its last fifteen or twenty years.
          Last edited by Lpeters199; 11-22-2011, 02:14 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Chevy114 View Post
            The same question for Cleveland was the mistake by the lake in a bad area?
            Downtown Cleveland was pretty rough when I was a kid, but the Stadium was far enough from it that it didn't seem very dangerous to me. In the 70s Jacobs Field would have been in a worse area then Cleveland Stadium was.

            I was stationed in Long Beach in the mid-80s. You couldn't have paid me enough to go to the LA Coliseum then.

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            • #7
              The area around Yankee Stadium was pretty rough in the 70's and 80's. The night Ali fought Kenny Norton was probably the worst night in Yankee Stadium history. Though, I still wouldn't hang around too late after the game in the South Bronx.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chevy114 View Post
                How is oakland? Does it just get a bad rep or is it the real deal for shady neighborhoods?
                Oakland's O.co is out in a business/ light industrial area. No neighborhood there to be bad really. The area is known for being a dump zone for losers of dog fights, that sort of thing. Have never thought twice about anything when going there. Drunken Raiders fans inside the stadium on game day is another thing. But that's an issue for every team in existence I think. Candlestick has it's share of unruly drunks too. They're just drunk on white wine toddies instead of Bud light is all.

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                • #9
                  My vote would be Connie Mack in its last 10 years.

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                  • #10
                    People always make things out to be so much worse than they actually are/were.

                    If I had to pick one venue I'd go w/ RYS in the late 70s through the mid 80s. Violent crime was at an all time high in the US, the crack epidemic was taking off, the NYPD and city services were underfunded bc the city was broke. The Bronx was a total S hole based on fiction and docu films that I've seen i.e. The Warriors, Ric Burns' New York, Son of Sam, etc. There was a shooting in the stands of RYS in 1985 resulting from a stray bullet fired somewhere outside of the ballpark.

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                    • #11
                      Miami Gardens, where the Marlins played from their inception through this season, is no picnic. Little Havana will be a slight improvement.

                      (Note: the area where Joe Robbie/Pro Player/Dolphin/Dolphins/Landshark/SunLife/Your Name Here Stadium is has only been known as Miami Gardens since 2003, when a majority of the residents voted to incorporate, before that, it was just unincorporated (Miami-)Dade County.)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TommieAgeefan View Post
                        Miami Gardens, where the Marlins played from their inception through this season, is no picnic. Little Havana will be a slight improvement.

                        (Note: the area where Joe Robbie/Pro Player/Dolphin/Dolphins/Landshark/SunLife/Your Name Here Stadium is has only been known as Miami Gardens since 2003, when a majority of the residents voted to incorporate, before that, it was just unincorporated (Miami-)Dade County.)
                        That's odd. I never really noticed a neighborhood around JRS. I suppose I always took the FLA Turnpike extension that delivered you straight into the parking lot. That could be it.

                        Little Havanna really isn't a bad neighborhood. (Or wasn't the last time I went to a Hurricanes game in 2003, I suppose things could've changed in 8 years.)
                        StadiumPage.com
                        Stadium Google Map

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CandlestickBum View Post
                          Oakland's O.co is out in a business/ light industrial area. No neighborhood there to be bad really.
                          So Gertrude Stein was right?
                          They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
                            So Gertrude Stein was right?
                            Well, not there there anyway.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RfkFedEx View Post
                              People always make things out to be so much worse than they actually are/were.

                              If I had to pick one venue I'd go w/ RYS in the late 70s through the mid 80s. Violent crime was at an all time high in the US, the crack epidemic was taking off, the NYPD and city services were underfunded bc the city was broke. The Bronx was a total S hole based on fiction and docu films that I've seen i.e. The Warriors, Ric Burns' New York, Son of Sam, etc. There was a shooting in the stands of RYS in 1985 resulting from a stray bullet fired somewhere outside of the ballpark.
                              BTW, in the very early 1990s one of the biggest sports radio topics was that the Yankees NEEDED to get out of the Bronx (I think at this point the Jersey Meadowlands was the leading place for them to wind up).

                              Anyway, one of my favorite "NEVER AGAIN" sob stories I've heard was a guy saying he was going to a game with a friend who "designed" the Big Bat (yes I know it's just a smoke stack with affects on top to look like a baseball bat, which is why I question the validity of this story) and they saw a group of people surrounding it. At first they thought it was a group of admirers, but it turned out someone was killed and handcuffed to it, which would be hard to do without a ladder or something (It may have been chained, but at the same time, you'd think THAT would be a well known news item).

                              Love to know if all those callers who said NEVER AGAIN back in that time period were indeed back when the Yankees started winning in the mid 1990s.
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