Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1909 Mystery MLB Ballpark - ID help?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1909 Mystery MLB Ballpark - ID help?

    This is a 1909 image, I believe, but what is the ballpark ID? It has a distinctive look. Thanks.
    [It is indeed Recreation Park in San Francisco, 1909. Thanks Melottfan and Chevy114].
    Attached Files
    Last edited by coastleague; 01-05-2013, 08:09 AM.

  • #2
    Reminds me of Palace of the fans (below), but I know it's not. Makes me wonder how many other parks had the small lower deck and large upper deck like that?

    palace01.jpg
    The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

    Comment


    • #3
      Do not recall the name of the ballpark, but it is in San Francisco. Looks like either Spring Training, or some kind of exhibition game.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great pic, must be spring training, info below, would love to know a little more about it.

        ws09.jpg


        Here's another pic of Recreation Park, possibly 1920's.

        Last edited by alpineinc; 01-05-2013, 01:28 PM.

        Showcasing the finest photography to illuminate the lesser known stories from classic baseball. Now over 2000 followers!
        https://twitter.com/behindthebagbtb

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by alpineinc View Post
          Great pic, must be spring training, info below, would love to know a little more about it.
          Interesting that they actually shortened the roof, if that picture's actually taken in the 20s.
          "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

          Comment


          • #6
            Rec Park was also famous or infamous for its rightfield wall......only 235 feet down the line, with a 20 foot wall + 50 foot screen.

            Comment


            • #7
              It also was used before and after the Ewing field debacle right?
              The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes.....Seals Stadium replaced it in 1931.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ben Grimm View Post
                  Interesting that they actually shortened the roof, if that picture's actually taken in the 20s.
                  I don't think the roof's been changed at all. Everything looks the same to me, including the roof support columns and the wall atop/behind the uncovered seast sections.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BigRon View Post
                    I don't think the roof's been changed at all. Everything looks the same to me, including the roof support columns and the wall atop/behind the uncovered seast sections.
                    I don't know the first pic looks like it has 2 rows of poles and ends in the first 3 rows or so, while the 2nd one appears to have 1 row of poles and it ends about 15 rows back.
                    The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Two more. Apparently there was considerable expansion in 1915. Roof was shortened, among other major changes.

                      RecPark_-_1st_to_3rd_Upper_640T.jpg

                      Basebnew$big-rec-1924.jpg

                      Showcasing the finest photography to illuminate the lesser known stories from classic baseball. Now over 2000 followers!
                      https://twitter.com/behindthebagbtb

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for the great comments. The player at bat is Dave Altizer. He is wearing a Chicago White Sox road uniform. Altizer's only year with the White Sox was 1909. The opposing team appears to be the San Francisco Seals based on three indicators: (1) The game is in Rec Park, the Seals home ball park; (2) The White Sox played a series of games against the Seals at Rec Park in March 1909**; (3) The catcher's uniform matches the Seals' 1909 uniform (though the socks aren't visible). Seals catchers Nick Williams and Claude Berry caught the Rec Park contests against the White Sox. I suspect Williams is the catcher in the photo based on relative heights; Berry was a couple of inches shorter than Altizer, Williams was a couple of inches taller, and it appears from the photo that were the catcher to stand upright he'd be taller than Altizer. I'd welcome any more information to confirm or refute all that. Thanks.
                        **The Seals played the White Sox on March 5 (Seals catcher: Nick Williams), March 7 (Williams), March 12 (Seals catcher: Claude Berry), March 13 (Berry), March 19 (Berry), March 26 (Berry), and March 27 (Williams).
                        Last edited by coastleague; 01-07-2013, 10:48 AM. Reason: added information

                        Comment

                        Ad Widget

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X