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  • Truist Park / SunTrust Park

    The Atlanta Braves announced today that they are leaving Turner Field and building a new ballpark in Cobb County.

    The new Home of the Braves will debut on Opening Day 2017.

    The ballpark will be located near the junction of I-285 and I-75 north of the city.





    From SI.com:
    What We Know (So Far) about the New Atlanta Braves Stadium
    BY TIM NEWCOMB

    While we’ve grown accustomed to—and frankly quite tired of—drawn out public financing battles over proposed stadiums, the Atlanta Braves pulled off one of the biggest stadium surprises ever on Veterans Day, announcing a move to Cobb County with construction starting on a brand-new stadium in about half a year. Here’s what we know so far about the new digs:

    • It will seat 41,000 to 42,000 fans, slightly less than the 49,500 Turner Field now holds.

    • Expect an open-air concept.

    • Construction will start in mid-2014 and it will open in time for the 2017 season.

    • Atlanta has secured HKS Architects of Dallas to at least consult on the project. HKS is the firm that designed the Dallas Cowboys and Indianapolis Colts football stadiums, provided the design for the planned Minnesota Vikings stadium, and also designed the 10,000-seat Coolray Field, which opened in Lawrenceville, Ga., the home of the AAA Gwinnett Braves.

    • The new stadium will sit at the intersection of Interstates 75 and 285 in Cobb County.

    • But still expect an Atlanta address in the 30339 zip code.

    • The new site is about 12 miles northwest of Turner Field

    • The stadium will take up 15 acres of a 60-acre site that will feature ample parking and plenty of mixed-use development, everything from retail to hotels.

    • The venue caters to vehicle traffic, with parking and no light rail service.

    • Siting the stadium in Cobb County bucks the trend of deeply urban parks we’ve seen in Major League Baseball over the last 15 years.

    • The Braves will sell naming rights for the new stadium.

    • Of the $672 million pricetag, Cobb County will pay for $450 million. The Braves, who will initially pay $200 million, will also cover cost overruns.

    • Turner Field, only leased and not owned by the Braves, was built for the 1996 Summer Olympics, and was turned over to the Braves after a retrofit for the 1997 season. The new stadium will also be publicly owned.

    • There are 13 stadiums older than Turner Field in MLB, including Coors Field, which opened in 1995.

    • Turner Field will be the newest MLB ballpark vacated.

    • The newest stadium to be vacated is the 1987-opened Sun Life Stadium, which the Miami Marlins played in from 1993 until 2011. The stadium is still in use hosting football.
    Last edited by JohnCropp; 11-11-2013, 08:20 PM.

  • #2
    Any cost projections yet? How are they paying for it too?

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    • #3
      As I said in the turner field section, I am interested to see what is so different than Turner field that they "have" to move.
      The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

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      • #4
        Idk much about that area, but it looks like a suburban hell hole from birds eye. Not too friendly for pedestrians either. The parking revenue potential looks to be nice for Uncle Ted.

        I gather that pre and post game entertainment options will include chain restaurants, and shopping at big the box stores that'll inevitably spring up w/ the new ballpark. You know, character places that allow people to identify with the community, while giving a sense of Atlanta's culture and history. It'll be just like Wrigleyville.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RfkFedEx View Post
          Idk much about that area, but it looks like a suburban hell hole from birds eye. Not too friendly for pedestrians either. The parking revenue potential looks to be nice for Uncle Ted.

          I gather that pre and post game entertainment options will include chain restaurants, and shopping at big the box stores that'll inevitably spring up w/ the new ballpark. You know, character places that allow people to identify with the community, while giving a sense of Atlanta's culture and history. It'll be just like Wrigleyville.
          Uncle Ted hasn't owned the Braves for 15 years. If he did this wouldn't be happening.

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          • #6
            The Braves and Cobb County, a perfect fit.

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            Modern Synthetic Baseball Fields

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            • #7
              I'm not exactly jumping for joy as I live south of Atlanta, and I find it hard to justify replacing a 20 year-old stadium. With that said, this a much better location for most season ticket holders. Turner Field is also in a run-down area of Atlanta, a fan got shot walking home from a game back in May.

              IMO it was inevitable that the Braves were going to try to move to the northern suburbs, I'm just shocked that it's happening so soon.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Phantom Dreamer View Post
                The Braves and Cobb County, a perfect fit.

                When the name change crusade gets finished with the Washington Redskins, the Braves and Indians will be next.

                I wouldn't be surprised if this stadium move ties into a complete rebranding of the franchsie while the Native American theme is retired.

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                • #9
                  I don't get this, unless Atlanta is different than most cities, but families can't afford games anymore nor can they stay up until 11 on weeknights with their kids at games like downtown young professionals can, but again maybe they know something I don't.
                  The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    My fav. quote from the home of the braves website's FAQ's:

                    Turner Field has served the Braves well since 1997, but it is in need of major infrastructure work, which will cost around $150 million. These upgrades are functional ones, such as replacing worn-out seats or upgrading the stadium’s lighting, and they would do little to significantly enhance the fan experience. If the Braves were to pay for additional projects focused on improving the fan experience, the additional costs could exceed $200 million.
                    The numbers are more than likely inflated and they are acting like 150 million vs. what will probably be a 750 million based on other recent stadiums is a fair trade off.
                    The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SouthGeorgiaBrave View Post
                      I'm not exactly jumping for joy as I live south of Atlanta, and I find it hard to justify replacing a 20 year-old stadium. With that said, this a much better location for most season ticket holders. Turner Field is also in a run-down area of Atlanta, a fan got shot walking home from a game back in May.

                      IMO it was inevitable that the Braves were going to try to move to the northern suburbs, I'm just shocked that it's happening so soon.
                      Yes, because Rays fans are ever so happy going to a ballpark on the far reaches of the metro area instead of one that is centrally located with access to public transit.

                      I'm sure it will work out just as peachy (pardon the pun) for Braves fans.

                      Suburban ballpark sites suck. Even if the stadium itself is decent. (I.e. Kansas City).
                      Last edited by PeteU; 11-11-2013, 12:18 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Found this, it provides some insight as to what might be the real motivations: http://www.ballparkmagic.com/
                        "Baseball is like church. Many attend, few understand. "
                        Leo Durocher
                        US baseball manager (1906 - 1991)

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                        • #13
                          Wow, is this the shortest time a team has spent in a stadium? (without moving to another city, or playing in a temporary site)

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                          • #14
                            Winnipeg offered the Braves a new home?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MC EXPOS View Post
                              Wow, is this the shortest time a team has spent in a stadium? (without moving to another city, or playing in a temporary site)
                              I guess if you count Exhibition Stadium as a "new" stadium (a portion of that stadium dated back to 1959, but the main baseball grandstand was built for the Blue Jays when they started in 1977), the Blue Jays only played 12 years there. If I recall correctly, Exhibition Stadium was not a temporary site in the sense that a successor stadium had already been planned, although it became evident very quickly that it couldn't be the indefinite home of the Jays.

                              The Twins only played in Metropolitan Stadium for 20 years, although it was a smaller minor league stadium for four years prior to that.

                              Arlington Stadium hosted the Rangers for 22 years, although it was a smaller minor league stadium for 7 years prior to that.

                              Kingdome hosted the Mariners for 22 years.

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