Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The batting thread.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by pgibbons
    Also, to my uneducated eyes, it also looks like Williams is tilting and maintaining the box as well (some phrases I've heard and am trying to understand better). Am I right about this?

    Before I found this, I never realized just how skinny a guy Teddy Ballgame was.
    The box is 4 imaginary lines that go from front shoulder to back shoulder, back shoulder to hands, hands to front elbow, and front elbow to front shoulder. You should form this box in your stance and it should not change its shape as you turn your shoulders to move the bathead into the ball.

    Here is Ted's box in his stance, and at contact. You don't use your arms and hands to move the bat. You use your hips and shoulders to rotate your body and the box.



    Compare Ted above to Paul Nyman's simulation of how he believes ALL high-level MLB hitters move.

    Last edited by jbooth; 12-30-2005, 11:48 AM.

    Comment


    • #47
      Gosh..what a real doofus..how does anybody even give him a uniform?
      Well, look at the $39 million they threw at Furcal, a decent (career .284 hitter) and below average fielder. I bet the Dodgers could get this guy for no more than a million per and be better off. (Better yet, they'd be free to send that fraud Kent up to Oakland to re-unite him with Milton Bradley.)
      The red line shows how a tilt of the spint gets you in position to hit certain pitches?
      The perpendicular red lines simply show that the hitter's spine is perpendicular to the plane of the hitter's swing. Note that the hitter's top arm (upper and lower), bottom forearm, hands and bat are all in the same swing plane. The optimal technique is for the swing plane to be perpendicular to the spine on every pitch, regardless of location.

      The point of the swing plane being perpendicular to the spine is simply that it is the most efficient mechanism to deliver all the spine's rotational power to the end of the second pendulum (i.e., the bathead). Compare this to the mechanism of a discus thrower as shown below, whose technique is studied by engineers to the Nth degree. Same idea => stay perpendicular.


      And, hey, is it just me, or does it seem that frames 3 and 4 of the Williams image cannot be on the same swing? How does the bathead jump so much vertically?
      sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Ursa Major
        Note that the hitter's top arm (upper and lower), bottom forearm, hands and bat are all in the same swing plane. The optimal technique is for the swing plane to be perpendicular to the spine on every pitch, regardless of location.

        So you are saying this guy has a chance?

        Comment


        • #49
          So you are saying this guy has a chance?
          Not if this swing shows up only once every three years. And only if Joaquin Benoit gets traded to the National League.
          sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

          Comment


          • #50
            jbooth, thanks for the swing analyses, that really helps.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Ursa Major
              Not if this swing shows up only once every three years. And only if Joaquin Benoit gets traded to the National League.
              I hear ya...I bet that guy wishes he had control of when he gets his chances and how many chances he gets.h

              Comment


              • #52
                MLB Swings

                Originally posted by RottenGazebo
                I created this thread so people can share there thoughts, ideas, ands tips on great batting.

                TIGERFAN84 :gt
                Here are 9 examples of turning "the box".

                None of these guys swing down, or extend their arms before contact.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by jbooth
                  Here are 9 examples of turning "the box".

                  None of these guys swing down, or extend their arms before contact.

                  Good Examples, my guess is that if we were to see these swings in entirety, they would start down, but as there back side gets into the swing and they stay behind the ball, that is when there swing gets in the position we are seeing in these clips.

                  That is why it takes a good teacher to explain the "swing down" theory. Many people take the swing down as a Chop and its not that at all, it happens VERY early in the swing.

                  Also, in every one of these swings these hitters are letting the ball get deep in the zone before making contact. Thus they are able to stay "in the box" as you describe. If they were fooled on the pitch or out in front of a pitch they would lose this box and that is when good hands/hand eye cordination takes over. Agree?

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    I have never played any organized baseball or had any professional coaching. I do, however, play some recreational baseball and softball. I have trouble pulling the ball in the air, and if I want to drive the ball deep, I usually have to really pull my weight ball and uppercut the ball, and my longest drives are always to center and rightcenter. When I do pull the ball, it's usually soft grounders to 3B. I also hit grounders/low liners to 2B and 1B. (I bat RH)

                    Does this sound like a swing problem or body mechanics problem?

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by hiddengem
                      Good Examples, my guess is that if we were to see these swings in entirety, they would start down, but as there back side gets into the swing and they stay behind the ball, that is when there swing gets in the position we are seeing in these clips.

                      That is why it takes a good teacher to explain the "swing down" theory. Many people take the swing down as a Chop and its not that at all, it happens VERY early in the swing.

                      Also, in every one of these swings these hitters are letting the ball get deep in the zone before making contact. Thus they are able to stay "in the box" as you describe. If they were fooled on the pitch or out in front of a pitch they would lose this box and that is when good hands/hand eye cordination takes over. Agree?
                      A "down swing" is a Charlie Lau/Dave Hudgens swing. The hands go in a direct line from their starting position around the shoulder, to the height of the ball or toward their waist.

                      Here is a quick and dirty change I made to this picture;
                      The white plane is a correct Barry Bonds type swing, the orange plane is a "down swing." It's not a great picture, but I think you get the idea.



                      The 9 guys in the photo are at the point in the swing, shown by the skeleton on the right, below.

                      Last edited by jbooth; 01-01-2006, 06:30 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by jbooth
                        A "down swing" is a Charlie Lau/Dave Hudgens swing. The hands go in a direct line from their starting position around the shoulder, to the height of the ball or toward their waist.

                        Here is a quick and dirty change I made to this picture;
                        The white plane is a correct Barry Bonds type swing, the orange plane is a "down swing." It's not a great picture, but I think you get the idea.



                        The 9 guys in the photo are at the point in the swing, shown by the skeleton on the right, below.

                        Yes, that is the "chop" I was referring to, or a slash across the strike zone as I like to call it.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Joltin' Joe said: I have never played any organized baseball or had any professional coaching. I do, however, play some recreational baseball and softball. I have trouble pulling the ball in the air, and if I want to drive the ball deep, I usually have to really pull my weight ball and uppercut the ball, and my longest drives are always to center and rightcenter. When I do pull the ball, it's usually soft grounders to 3B. I also hit grounders/low liners to 2B and 1B. (I bat RH)

                          Does this sound like a swing problem or body mechanics problem?
                          Well, if you're topping the ball when you try to pull it, I'd venture to guess that you're pulling off the ball. Could be a number of reasons: rotating your shoulders too soon, straightening your front leg, having your weight back on your heels, or just upper cutting, for starters.

                          First, of course, make sure you're not trying to pull pitches on the outer half of the plate. If your pop is to center and right, you're cheating yourself by trying to pull anyway.

                          Second, have someone videotape you from the front and side in batting practice and compare what you do when you pull versus when you hit well towards center and right. Focusing on these potential problems and those that others more knowledgeable than I might raise may give you a clue.

                          And, Joe, what does it mean to "pull my weight ball"???
                          sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            From Coach

                            Originally posted by RottenGazebo
                            How can I increase bat speed? I'm trying out for my school team and we use heavier bats than I am used to.
                            RG your bat size should be determined by what you can effectively swing, not the league in which you play. Junior high and high school teams typically use a minus 3 bat. They are typically 29"-33" long and 26-30 ounces in weight.

                            OTHER NOTES: The National Federation of State High School Associations limits the diameter of a bat to 2 5/8 inches. and it has to be BESR rated (Baseball Exit Speed Ratio)

                            An easy way to properly size a bat is to hold the bat straight out in front of you parallel to the ground with your throwing hand on the knob. If you can hold the bat steady without it shaking or dropping for more than 20 seconds the bat may be too light. If you can't hold the bat steady for more than fifteen seconds the bat is too heavy.
                            Last edited by Jake Patterson; 01-02-2006, 04:53 PM.
                            "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                            - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              jake question about besr.Are big barell bats also rated? If these bats all have to comply are any REALLY hotter than another?

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by wogdoggy
                                jake question about besr.Are big barell bats also rated? If these bats all have to comply are any REALLY hotter than another?
                                No....I believe the National Assoc of High Schools only recognizes a 2 5/8" barrell, Little League allows 2 5/8 with a 33" max only. They also have specific requirements for softball bats.

                                Yes....
                                The manufactures would try to add zip to the bat by controlling weight distribution and drop. A simple example would be a light bat with more weight at the head could be swung faster and therfore create higher ball exit speeds. Once players started getting hurt a couple of physicist developed the Besr rating system. The BESR (Basball exit speed ratio) sets the performance of the bat to simulate a fast ball (I think I remember 75 MPH) being hit by a Northern White Ash bat being swung at (70 MPH).

                                Since the BESR regulations came out manufacturers have been working on the metals used in the bats themselves. This does make a difference, but not to the degree a varying drop differential would.

                                Hope this helps....
                                Last edited by Jake Patterson; 01-03-2006, 11:42 AM.
                                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                                Comment

                                Ad Widget

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X