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  • pronate the wrist?

    i have heard "pronate the wrist" a few times now, and i'm not exactly sure if means to tilt the wrist or to turn the wrist (like the motion in throwing a screwball.)

    Could someone give me a picture of a wrist being "pronated"?

  • #2
    Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
    i have heard "pronate the wrist" a few times now, and i'm not exactly sure if means to tilt the wrist or to turn the wrist (like the motion in throwing a screwball.)

    Could someone give me a picture of a wrist being "pronated"?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Johnny_Damon
      so it's where you twist your wrist?

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      • #4
        Supination and pronation can better be visualized by the palm position.

        If the hand is pronated the palm faces down. If the hand is supinated the palm faces up ( like it would hold soup; a way for medical students to remember)

        The pronated top hand in batting ( Palm really faces the pitcher if you should open the grip and let the bat drop.) It faces more forward and sloped downward but not really turned down completely.

        It is partially pronated. THe partially pronated top hand CANNOT go forward at swing initiation. IT must go back.

        THe reason this hand set works is that the top hand must go back as the hips shift to drive. IT sets up a great rotational swing vs pulling both hands forward in a linear swing path. In this hand set the barrel gets turned around the hands as the shoulder turn begins.....the secret to hitting

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        • #5
          So, if you were to throw a screwball you would subinate your wrist and a curveball/slider pronate the wrist?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
            You are 13 years old don't even to try to throw a curveball unless your biological age is 16 or older. I'm not even joking.

            I heard of a man who's father had died at a young age so he never had an old man to tell him not to throw junk, he was throwing screwballs, forkballs, slurves, and curves by the age of 13. Later in a game when he was only 15 years old he threw a pitch and his arm fell out of socket. He commented on a pitching instructor's webpage saying how he was happy his son would not have to have the same fate as he did. I hope you learn something from that, because you may very well have the same fate if you're trying to throw curves.

            And trust me, I don't know one curveball thrower in my league that was 13-15 that threw a curve that I didn't slam on. (Vast majority of curves from a 13 year old don't break. They hang.)
            If you think this is true, why are you trying to learn a screwball?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Johnny_Damon
              If you think this is true, why are you trying to learn a screwball?
              I'm not trying to learn a screwball, that is by far the last pitch I would ever want to learn.

              I am asking what pronating the wrist means because I was told alot of guys like Johan Santana and Jason Schmidt pronate their wrists while throwing the changeup.

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              • #8
                Ok. I wasn't sure what you were trying to throw.

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                • #9

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                  • #10
                    Pronation

                    Pronation (as it applies to pitching) is not about wrist action, it's an action of the forearm. In the hammer drawing above, pronation is the action of the forearm that causes the hammer to move from left to right. Supination is the opposite action from pronation.

                    Throwing a screwball is not necessarily damaging. If you throw it the way Mike Marshall did it's the easiest pitch on your arm. But don't even think about trying it unless you use his training protocol.
                    www.rpmpitching.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
                      So, if you were to throw a screwball you would subinate your wrist and a curveball/slider pronate the wrist?
                      Your hand naturally pronates (thumb turns toward the ground) when you throw. When you throw a slider, your hand supinates (the thumb turns up)

                      Yes, you go beyond natural pronation, to throw a screw ball. Natural pronation occurs after release. For a screw ball, you pronate before release.
                      Last edited by jbooth; 12-02-2006, 09:00 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Edmondsfan, I'm assuming your trying to get a sink to your change up. How I get my change up to sink is by spinating my wrist so the circle I make points upward, the ball then spins in a way that the circle becomes visible from the seams and has late sink.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EdmondsFan#1
                          So, if you were to throw a screwball you would subinate your wrist and a curveball/slider pronate the wrist?
                          No.

                          It's the opposite.

                          A screwball is thrown using pronation and a curveball or slider are typically thrown using supination.
                          Obsessed with Pitching Mechanics.

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