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  • What are the top Training Aids?

    There are tons of products out there, and there has been some discussion about a few of them on different threads, so why not strat an entirely new thread?

    OK, I guess a Tee is ideal. What about a Swing-A-Way? A Hands-Back Tee?

    Wheeled Pitching machines v. Iron Mike arm machines?

    Comments?

  • #2
    Great idea for a thread - I'm sure we will hear pro and cons of all different kinds of training aids. I believe some are useful and others are a means for their creators to make a buck or two.
    I have had success with the Hands Back Hitter - used as a station at practice to achieve certain goals.
    Of course a hitting tee is ideal. There are plastic balls similar to wiffle balls, called "pickle balls" that last way longer than your average plastic type balls. The absolute best training aid - a good instructor!

    Comment


    • #3
      A good friend and collegue of mine showed me this product, and I'm interested in it. I often have the hardest time getting kids to "keep the box" throughout the load and rotation. They always want to "bar" the lead arm, which creates drag through the zone. This might be something the kids can wear to get the feeling of keeping the lead arm bent. I believe Jbooth has purchased this to see how it is. Here is the link to the product and a picture of the box, in case anybody doesn't know what it is.

      http://www.baseballexp.com/baseball/...ductDesc=12609
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by hiddengem
        A good friend and collegue of mine showed me this product, and I'm interested in it. I often have the hardest time getting kids to "keep the box" throughout the load and rotation. They always want to "bar" the lead arm, which creates drag through the zone. This might be something the kids can wear to get the feeling of keeping the lead arm bent. I believe Jbooth has purchased this to see how it is. Here is the link to the product and a picture of the box, in case anybody doesn't know what it is.
        I saw a hitter in the cages last year with a devise that looks similar. It was a velcro wrap around the upper arm with surgical tube connected to what looked like a batting glove. After watching him use it for a while I could not figure out its purpose and lost interest.
        "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
        - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
        Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by hiddengem
          A good friend and collegue of mine showed me this product, and I'm interested in it. I often have the hardest time getting kids to "keep the box" throughout the load and rotation. They always want to "bar" the lead arm, which creates drag through the zone. This might be something the kids can wear to get the feeling of keeping the lead arm bent. I believe Jbooth has purchased this to see how it is. Here is the link to the product and a picture of the box, in case anybody doesn't know what it is.

          http://www.baseballexp.com/baseball/...ductDesc=12609
          Ok, I think the idea of maintaining the box is important and for many young kids difficult to do, is this the ony device that can do that? How ould one invent such a device?

          Comment


          • #6
            How about using PVC pipe to make the "box", strap it to the forearm at the wrist and just under the elbow? Was also thinking about some kind of break-away cord that would connect the back shoulder to the bat just above the hands that could be the seperation indicator. Am I out on a limb with this or is this what we are trying to achieve?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tominct
              Wheeled Pitching machines v. Iron Mike arm machines?Comments?
              We have a wheel machine that I use for outfield practice. I found this to be much more efficient than me trying to hit fly balls to a spot. I set the machine up and move the player's starting position to simulate different fielding skills, i.e. moving left, right, in, out, etc... It's amazing how many more reps we can get in. I also use old baseballs not the plastic balls that come with the machine. As far as the height the machine can throw. The first time I used it I set both wheels at max and ... thoomp! I don't think the ball has come down yet...
              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tadlock11
                How about using PVC pipe to make the "box", strap it to the forearm at the wrist and just under the elbow? Was also thinking about some kind of break-away cord that would connect the back shoulder to the bat just above the hands that could be the seperation indicator. Am I out on a limb with this or is this what we are trying to achieve?
                I think Jbooth made something with wood, where he put 2 pieces of wood together at a 90degree angle that was strapped on top of the forearm and up the bicep.

                Jim, am I correct with this?

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think Jbooth made something with wood, where he put 2 pieces of wood together at a 90degree angle that was strapped on top of the forearm and up the bicep.
                  I saw it at Jim's facility, and it's exactly as you described. We didn't use it though, as we concentrated on my son's lower half.

                  I think "arm barring" is overrated as a hitting flaw. Certainly, many major leaguers rotate with their front arm almost straight. (HG, remember your hitting clip of you "walking away from your hands"?) Indeed, you need to do that on outside pitches, and it increases the initial circumference of your hands' arc, thereby increasing the batspeed generation as you tighten up the arc. Griffey and Chipper are prominent straight arm hitters; here's Frank Thomas doing it too:


                  My sense is that the problem isn't so much barring as such, but bad posture. Kids are too erect and too far back on their heels, so the only way that can get to outside pitches is to thrust their arms out straight. That's where the problem should be addressed.

                  As far as keeping kids arms' "connected" to maximize the impact of their rotation, I think one device that someone should invent is something I pulled together after chatting with Jim Booth, that looks like this:

                  The idea is that both the elasticized wrist strap and upper bicep strap have Velcro-type strips. During drills, the batter takes his stance with his wrist stuck to the point of his back shoulder. He'll feel the tension holding his hands there as he rotates, reminding him to keep the arm there until the centrifugal force helps to rip the wrist (and hands, and bat) free from the shoulder.
                  sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ursa Major
                    I saw it at Jim's facility, and it's exactly as you described. We didn't use it though, as we concentrated on my son's lower half.

                    I think "arm barring" is overrated as a hitting flaw. Certainly, many major leaguers rotate with their front arm almost straight. (HG, remember your hitting clip of you "walking away from your hands"?) Indeed, you need to do that on outside pitches, and it increases the initial circumference of your hands' arc, thereby increasing the batspeed generation as you tighten up the arc. Griffey and Chipper are prominent straight arm hitters; here's Frank Thomas doing it too:


                    My sense is that the problem isn't so much barring as such, but bad posture. Kids are too erect and too far back on their heels, so the only way that can get to outside pitches is to thrust their arms out straight. That's where the problem should be addressed.

                    As far as keeping kids arms' "connected" to maximize the impact of their rotation, I think one device that someone should invent is something I pulled together after chatting with Jim Booth, that looks like this:

                    The idea is that both the elasticized wrist strap and upper bicep strap have Velcro-type strips. During drills, the batter takes his stance with his wrist stuck to the point of his back shoulder. He'll feel the tension holding his hands there as he rotates, reminding him to keep the arm there until the centrifugal force helps to rip the wrist (and hands, and bat) free from the shoulder.
                    So, you don't feel staying in the box is that important?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ursa Major
                      I think "arm barring" is overrated as a hitting flaw. Certainly, many major leaguers rotate with their front arm almost straight. (HG, remember your hitting clip of you "walking away from your hands"?) Indeed, you need to do that on outside pitches, and it increases the initial circumference of your hands' arc, thereby increasing the batspeed generation as you tighten up the arc. Griffey and Chipper are prominent straight arm hitters; here's Frank .
                      Have to disagree with you. There's a difference between swinging with a relatively straight arm from start to finish, versus extending or "barring" the elbow" as a flaw in an intended "box" swing.

                      Breaking the box is a major problem. Swinging with a relatively straight arm can be done by some people, but it isn't a recommended method. HG is having problems trying to swing with straight arms, he needs to use the box.

                      If you use the straight arm technique, you need to make other adjustments to insure that the hands stay close to the body and you somehow have to get them around and in front quickly to get an inside pitch, and turning the box is quicker than trying to accelerate the handle with straight arms.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Instructo Swing - what is the purpose of the back of it curving away from the hitter?

                        Hi Erik,

                        Can you please explain the rationale for this? I was thinking it might help promote a more inside/out swing path if the hitter hit w/ the curve in towards him? As it is now, wouldn't it allow more casting (early pushing of the bat away from the body)?

                        Thanks,
                        Sandman

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MSandman
                          Hi Erik,

                          Can you please explain the rationale for this? I was thinking it might help promote a more inside/out swing path if the hitter hit w/ the curve in towards him? As it is now, wouldn't it allow more casting (early pushing of the bat away from the body)?

                          Thanks,
                          Sandman

                          MSandman,
                          I have included this drill in the new instructions with the IS5000 model. I had to improve the design to allow for this application. I agree that this will be more useful in developing an inside/outside swing path. This new unit will help promote this now.

                          Erik,

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Erik
                            MSandman,
                            I have included this drill in the new instructions with the IS5000 model. I had to improve the design to allow for this application. I agree that this will be more useful in developing an inside/outside swing path. This new unit will help promote this now.

                            Erik,
                            Thanks for the info Erik. So is there any recommendation to ever swing w/ the curve away from you? I'd love to see a video clip of someone swinging w/ the curve towards them.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Instructo Swing

                              Originally posted by MSandman
                              Thanks for the info Erik. So is there any recommendation to ever swing w/ the curve away from you? I'd love to see a video clip of someone swinging w/ the curve towards them.

                              I would say that most peoplw will use this device with the U-Bar facing away. I have added this drill to correct the casting problem. I would think that coaches and instructors that are aware of the value to this drill will enforce it. I wouldn't be surprised if parents and players are more inclined to just use the device without really applying this important casting drill. I personaly feel this drill is important, this is why I incorporated it to the new instructions. I will try to get a clip of this drill and send this to you. I need your email address.

                              Erik,

                              Comment

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