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  • Posted by Cbb:



    No audio for 1st 50sec...

    From Dr. Yeager's Baseball
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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    • Posted by Cbb:



      From Dr. Yeager's YouTube Channel--no audio

      send your coach to that site...
      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

      Comment


      • Posted by Song

        Cano (h/t FFS)



        I missed the linear part. Can you help?
        "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
        - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
        Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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        • I found this on Ellis's site. Very cool.

          efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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          • Posted by Chris Oleary

            Originally posted by Switch_Hitter_29 View Post
            I would bet money its a change up.
            Probably.

            Major timing adjustment in the black jersey clip.



            The white jersey clip is a much more conventional swing.
            "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
            - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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            • Posted by Peas:

              0-0 count, 90 mph fastball hit to LCF.... What say you now that you have a game swing with all the info you requested?

              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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              • Posted by Chris O'leary

                Originally posted by Chris O'Leary View Post
                While he's probably closer to a true door knocker knuckles aligned grip than most MLBers, he still doesn't do it the way most people teach it.

                I'm not seeing knocker knuckles
                Pujols grip.jpg
                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                • Posted by JBooth

                  Originally posted by Jesse View Post
                  Does anyone really keep the box grip all the way through contact??? I've tried it and it's almost impossible. But you guys obviously think it's a major issue so you must see it all the time. What's an indicator I can look for to determine if a kid is doing this?
                  Sure they do; or do you see what you want to see like Uncoach?

                  It's difficult to see in photos sometimes, how the knuckles line up. But, when you grip a bat the tip of your thumb matches where your knocker knuckles are. In the images below I've drawn a line from the tip of the thumb of the top hand, through the bottom hand. Personally, I see the knockers of the top hand lined up with the base of the fingers of the bottom hand. IOW, "box" grip.


                  "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                  - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                  Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                  Comment


                  • Posted by Jim Booth:

                    Originally posted by virg View Post
                    What it's all about in any competitive swing, is keeping the hands in as long as possible. Can't do it with a straight elbow. Don't get tangled in the terminology. This is however a fine slowpitch cut.
                    Well then, here's a couple of his game swings; they don't look too much different.



                    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                    • Posted by Sonny ....


                      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                      • From pthawaii:

                        Originally posted by Isabradley View Post
                        I'd agree with the idea of keeping the elbow connected along the hips/ribs. My son is only 6 but he understands the idea of staying compact. When he gets bees in the hands it's usually because his arms are extended, or nearly extended at POC. A quick reminder to "stay compact" usually fixes it, although not permanently. Getting some sting in the hands usually actually a motivator to stay more compact.
                        Song,
                        Thanks for the photos. Yes, he is disconnected. His back elbow is foward of the back hip as in your NOT picture. So now the question is, how do I help him fix that. We're talking about a kid that has a time just saying "keep you hands back," or "keep your back elbow back." I'm pretty sure that wont' work.

                        Isa,
                        I'll try the "compact swing" cue. Funny thing is, I've always thought he has a compact swing. He doesn't seem to cover that much plate and has trouble reaching outside pitches. I think his back elbow is bent, but it's just forward, which apparently isn't good. I need an easy drill to help him get connected. How about bottom hand only, keep elbow at side and rotate to hit ball off tee? Almost like a forehand in tennis?

                        As a last thought, some of the MLB pictures show the back elbow forward of the rear hip at contact, so I'm still not 100% sure how to tell disconnected and connected (unlesss the MLB pictures where the back elbow is forward = disconnected).



                        "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                        - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                        Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                        Comment


                        • Posted by Dirt:

                          Johnlanza,

                          “My son (who's almost eight) likes to work on pitching”
                          The first consideration you must make is determining his biological age not his chronological age to make further decisions about how to proceed with his stress levels in training or competition.
                          “fastballs and changeups”
                          Every pitch he learns must be pronated (thumb up elbow up during drive and finish) even the hardest to learn the pronated curve, fortunately the pronated curve is much easier to learn if you have not been proprioceptively engramed (muscle memory) by having thrown the injurious supinated ( thumb down, elbow down) version.
                          “with an occasional curve (at least he thinks it's a curve).”
                          Have him perfectly practice the pronated curve but not perform it in any competition until he is 11 or 12 biologically if he is going to pitch anyways.
                          “It will be Fall 2012 before he moves up to the kid-pitch division.”
                          The best recommendation is to wait until his epicondyle in his elbow solidifies at biologically 13 yo but then we would have no little leagues, if you are going to let him pitch competitively then never let him pitch more than 2 innings a week for no more than 3 months of the year all in one season. This way the stress is spread out amongst other kids who wish a shot at it.
                          “It seems like a side-spin curve would cause less stress on his arm than an over-the-top spin curve”
                          You have this in reverse!! The centripetal (sidespin or slurve or forearm flyout supinated curve) supinated curve will crash his elbow together in hyper extension ballistically causing loss of range of motion by deforming the bone ends of the Humerus and ulna. It will pinch the Hyaline cartilage in the elbow breaking off pieces that will later have bone spurs grow in the vacated spaces that sometimes break off and become loose bone chips. The growth plates are also negatively effected causing loss of growth potential and premature solidification where his pitching arm becomes biologically older than the glove arm!!!! The pronated curve only cause non crashing stress at the growth plates like the other pronated pitches.
                          “I'm no expert on pitching, but will a ball thrown with a side spin actually curve?”
                          Quite well actually but so will the inner structures of his growing bones, Ouch.
                          “Or does the spin have to have front rotation?”
                          The best spin is vertical rotation, batters have a much harder time squaring up this action and you can attain more RPM’s with it and more arc.
                          ”I hope this doesn't become a thread where I'll have to consult my Webster's Dictionary “
                          If it does you will be better off to guide your son.
                          Learning how to pitch long before you have to is the way to go and produces a much better overall result. Do not hold back his learning, he will only pitch what he commands in games depending on his personal motor learning ability. Spend time with him learning 2 pitches that move to the ball arm side of home plate the tailing (maxline) fastball and the screwball and 2 pitches that move to the glove arm side of home plate the tailing fastball (torque cutter) and curve ball that will lead him into later learning 2 more pitches the Sinker and slider all pronated and safe to perform.
                          Start with sport specific motor skill drills that will make him proprioceptively aware by performing the overload principle with heavy balls and wrist weights and motor skill drills. All my clients who start as young as your child learn all 4 pitches by the time they are 11 cyo. Here is an example of one of them. There are many more drills to learn that take up a lot of time without actually pitching competitively
                          This video shows the bucket lid motor skill drill for the pronated curve.



                          This video shows the football motor skill drill for the pronated curve and a few more types of pronated pitches with an adult high level pitcher.



                          This video shows an 11 cyo throwing all 4 pronated pitches using the football motor skill drills with an age appropriate football. This pitcher has trained to pitch for 2 years without one outing of competition until this summer where he dominated his opponents.



                          Roothog66,

                          “do you think maybe we should be teaching the screwball more?”
                          The screwball is the safest pitch on your arm because it hinges it correctly! It teaches you how to get forwards axis presentation on your fastball for movement to the ball arm side of home plate.

                          “Old school thinking was that it was dangerous”
                          Old school thinking is usually “Yard myth” anecdotal thinking. Anecdotal observance is the worst way to proceed scientifically and has stifled correct force application, training, motor skills and knowledge, this is changing now but at a snails pace. The screwball is actually the safest pitch on the arm.

                          “but I think alot of the more current research might indicate that it is a good breaking pitch to teach for younger players.”
                          I teach the screwball and fastball first! When they can get the concept we go right to the cutter and curve, even at 8 years old! Use it to replace a changeup.

                          “I think, properly learned, it is just as effective (maybe more effective) than a curve.”
                          Since yard myth has eliminated its use when a batter faces it they often buckle.

                          “Problem may be that hardly anyone knows how to throw/teach one anymore”
                          Go to Dr.Mike Marshall .com and learn from the leading overhead throwing expert on earth. He has complete pedagogy to proceed with any age group and it is all for free.
                          "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                          - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                          Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

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                          • Signs

                            Here's a great thread on defensive and offensive signs:
                            Enjoy!
                            (Thanks JJA for the link suggestion!)

                            http://www.baseball-fever.com/showth...-Coach-Signals

                            Jake
                            "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                            - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                            Comment


                            • From Swing Coach:

                              Is Front Shoulder Pull a teach? In other words, as I look at many powerful MLB swings, I notice how the front shoulder really pulls into and after contact...which helps hook the hands and create more bat head speed. Does this front shoulder pull happen automatically, or is it a teach into contact? I am leaning toward that it is a teach, especially when you look below at Ellsbury's shoulder pull on this HR swing below. Thoughts?
                              SC
                              PRO PHOTO SAMPLES 08-11-2011 0003.jpgJacoby Ellsbury 08-25-2011 0003.jpg
                              "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                              - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                              Comment


                              • Teaching Leads

                                From Tewks:

                                I started with a fall baseball team yesterday in a "middle school" division yesterday and a lot of the players were on the big field for the first time. Many of them have been playing on the 70 ft base paths where there are leads. One of the biggest things that jumped out at me yesterday was the secondary leads players were taking. They were nothing for players on either team. My guys were thrown together quickly and we haven't practiced yet, but I was still surprised about the quality of secondary leads.

                                I have stressed with the parents that the move to the big field changes the game in a lot of ways. This is just one of those details. A cue that I was using a lot yesterday was the same cue I used on Saturday with a high school age team. "Work hard both ways." The concept of working every pitch, focusing every pitch, anticipating every pitch is not something I felt when watching the game. I think one of the greatest challenges of baseball is being able to concentrate for each pitch. In the 9 inning game yesterday, the time ran well over three hours. The benefit of learning how to do this is it will translate over into other areas of life. Homework for 30 minutes, focusing on the little things and taking pride in getting the details right will become easier and easier. Anyway, back to secondary leads.


                                You have to start with a good primary lead. Practice getting out as far as you can with real pickoff moves. Keep going further until being out says you are too far. Do it in practice where you are learning instead of facing consequences.

                                Secondary Leads at First Base

                                Two good shuffles. Stay low with hip flexion, bent knees, flat back, shoulders over toes. Don't cross the feet. You should be finishing the secondary lead pretty close to when the ball is hitting the mitt. Read ball flight, anticipate a ball in the dirt. (Practice getting reads!) On a good secondary lead, you are gaining ground so that if the ball is in the dirt, you have cut your distance down. Also, on close force plays you give yourself a better change.

                                A good secondary lead should put pressure on the defense. The middle infielders should be aware of you. The catcher should be aware of you. As a runner, watch the catcher to see if he does anything weird when he has eye contact with the first baseman - tugging on his shirt, touching his wrist or face mask, picking up dirt and throwing it - all are common non-verbal pickoff plays.

                                Quality secondary leads will also set up a delayed steal. If the catcher and middle infielders are being lazy, you take a third shuffle and take off. You should be in easy. (First baseman, middle inf's and catcher should all be communicating with each other w/runners on first. "Heads up on the delay steal" is a good start. Middle infielders should be yelling "DELAY!!!" after the pitch hits the mitt on a delay steal.)

                                After a good secondary, hustle back to the back immediately on a clean catch by the catcher. Get back with some urgency. You don't need to sprint back into the bag, but the catcher should know that he can't get you.

                                Secondary Leads at Second Base

                                The primary lead from second base will be longer. Try three steps + two side steps to begin with. As a runner, your responsibility is the pitcher. Third base coach should be communicating where middle infielders are. (Middle infielders should be working the 3B coach as much as, if not more than, the runner.) The secondary lead will be two hard shuffles, followed by some hustle getting back to the back. Yesterday I had kids standing still entirely, taking some walking steps, getting into an athletic stance without gaining ground. Work hard both ways. Gain ground out, hustle back to the bag. Again, practice the distance you can get to.

                                The timing of finishing your secondary lead is similar to an infielder getting into their 'ready' position. You don't want to be stopped when making a read on a pitch. Read the play (pitch caught, dirt ball or other wild pitch, batted ball) when your lead is finishing. At second, reading a ball in the dirt is much easier than at first. In certain counts, you can really anticipate it. If a hitter crushes a fastball foul, expect off-speed next pitch. Pitches in 0-2 counts, maybe 1-1 counts after two fastballs and the hitter is right on things. The more you can anticipate and even expect a ball in the dirt, the more prepared you will be to take advantage of it.

                                With two outs, a runner on second will take a 'deeper' secondary lead. A normal lead would have the runner in the baseline (in line with the bases), but a 2-out lead will have the runner two steps back to get in better position for a turn around third. I know when I played I would tend to get depth with less than two outs because force plays at third are rare. If you are stealing or know a bunt is on, definitely get in the base path to shorten the distance to third. Make sure you are watching your 3B coach on batter balls when taking a turn. They will be watching the play for you. Your job is to run hard until you get stopped.

                                Secondary Leads at Third Base
                                At third, your primary lead will be more of a walking lead than at other bases. Pickoffs are rare, so you can start a little more casual with the primary and get an aggressive secondary lead. The primary and secondary lead will be in foul territory so that if you get hit by a batted ball, it will be foul and not an out. After the ball is caught, hustle back to the bag and get back with your body in a line that blocks the throw from the catcher to third. If the third baseman is on the back, use him as your guide. You will likely be in fair territory or at least on the line. Pickoffs from the catcher are more common with a lefty at the plate because they have a clean throw. Again, work hard both ways.



                                That's just a quick summary for each base. Maybe I'll do some video stuff for this because its such a basic part of the game that I wish was just normal. Let me know what you'd like to see the most. :o
                                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                                Comment

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