Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pitching Routines for Teenagers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pitching Routines for Teenagers

    I was discussing pre-season pitching routines with other coaches this evening. I am an advocate of adjusting the workout and throwing intensity versus throwing hard everyday and then adjusting schedules (i.e. Throw some every day of the week versus throw very hard on a few days per week.) I would of course adjust for arm fatigue.

    Coaches: What do you do?
    "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
    - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jake Patterson
    I was discussing pre-season pitching routines with other coaches this evening. I am an advocate of adjusting the workout and throwing intensity versus throwing hard everyday and then adjusting schedules (i.e. Throw some every day of the week versus throw very hard on a few days per week.) I would of course adjust for arm fatigue.

    Coaches: What do you do?
    How are you supposed to throw hard if you dont practice throwing hard?

    (I'm not being confrontational, just inquiring)
    Last edited by chisox2k5; 01-30-2006, 08:01 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Early in preseason I like to throw often (every other day, weekends off) like MWF but only for low pitch counts. This gives an opportunity to reinforce mechanics. So as the arms get into shape you could be doing mechanics drills (towell drill, etc) long toss and throwing off the mound for about 40 pitches, depending on the age and individual.

      As the season gets closer the pitch count increases but so does the rest in between. Maybe Monday mechanics and work up to 80 pitches, Wed do mechanics, pickoff moves and defense, then Thursday another 80 pitches.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by chisox2k5
        How are you supposed to throw hard if you dont practice throwing hard?

        (I'm not being confrontational, just inquiring)
        Not taken as confrontational....
        We establish specific routines for each pitcher. Pitch counts would also be adjusted based on the individual:
        Pitcher A may be (After their arms are in shape):

        Monday: All practices start with lead ups, dynamic stretching, some static arm stretching (Although this is monitored closley), some functional exercises, jogs, sprint and walks. When done we start throwing. I start with short toss with exagerated arm rotations (i.e. even though we throw easy we complete the follow through and hip rotations- muscle memory). When everone breaks up we take the pitchers and begin a series of off mound throwing drill, maybe target throwing with a four zone target. We then move to mound work -throwing 60% - 70%, working on techniques i.e. wind ups, balance, arm movement, finish, etc.. We would finish with short toss, running, and stretching if necessary.
        Tuesday:: Start with lead ups move to long toss. Today's emphasis would be long toss. We move to mound work at 60% again working on form, techniques and pitches.
        Wednesday: Lead ups, then we rotate several pitchers through a mocked game, three battters each maybe for 4-5 innings. 2-3 pitchers at a time.
        Thursday: Back to Monday's routine.
        Friday: Wednesday's routine.
        Saturday: Monday's routine.
        Sunday: Rest

        Just a basic outline
        Last edited by Jake Patterson; 01-31-2006, 06:45 AM.
        "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
        - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
        Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Jake Patterson
          Monday: All practices start with lead ups, dynamic stretching, some static arm stretching (Although this is monitored closley), some functional exercises, jogs, sprint and walks. When done we start throwing. I start with short toss with exagerated arm rotations (i.e. even though we throw easy we complete the follow through and hip rotations- muscle memory). When everone breaks up we take the pitchers and begin a series of off mound throwing drill, maybe target throwing with a four zone target. We then move to mound work -throwing 60% - 70%, working on techniques i.e. wind ups, balance, arm movement, finish, etc.. We would finish with short toss, running, and stretching if necessary.
          Why would you work on control (the 4 different zones thing) on flat ground when you can do it off a mound.

          I hope you arent 'working on techniques' all the time, you need to let your players just throw the piss out of the ball without worrying about all that crap.

          How much do you run?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by chisox2k5
            Why would you work on control (the 4 different zones thing) on flat ground when you can do it off a mound.
            We only have one indoor mound. We're a poor school from cold New England.... The 4 zone is a larger than normal strike zone and is used at the beginning of the season only. We eventually move to a 9-zone.

            Originally posted by chisox2k5
            I hope you arent 'working on techniques' all the time, you need to let your players just throw the piss out of the ball without worrying about all that crap. How much do you run?
            You should work on technique ALL the time! Why would you let a player throw the ball wrong? There are proper ways and wrong ways to throw short toss, long toss, quick toss etc.... Pitching techniques is worked on during our off-mound and on-mound work.

            High School 1-2 miles per day, base running each day, sprint and walks (sprint out 90'-walk back) each day for any pitcher that throws.
            "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
            - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jake Patterson
              We only have one indoor mound. We're a poor school from cold New England.... The 4 zone is a larger than normal strike zone and is used at the beginning of the season only. We eventually move to a 9-zone.
              Alright.



              You should work on technique ALL the time! Why would you let a player throw the ball wrong? There are proper ways and wrong ways to throw short toss, long toss, quick toss etc.... Pitching techniques is worked on during our off-mound and on-mound work.
              No. You dont achieve your maximum potential when you are thinking about all that crap. You achieve your maximum potential when you just 'let let it happen.'

              Do you think Roger Clemens is worrying about that stuff when hes in a game? No. There has to be a time where you put it all together, and if you are counting on a pitcher to put it all together for the first time in a game you are destined for failure.

              High School 1-2 miles per day, base running each day, sprint and walks (sprint out 90'-walk back) each day for any pitcher that throws.
              You dont do sprints and your distance running on the same day. Do your 2-3 miles (not 1-2 thats not enough) after your bullpen or the day after your start. Then do 60 yard dashes (not 90 feet, thats not enough either) the next day or however you want to work it into your inbetween start or conditioning schedule.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by chisox2k5
                You achieve your maximum potential when you just 'let let it happen.
                Agree - but that has to be developed. It's difficult to compare pros to youngsters. "Just letting it happen" for a pro is the result of thousand of hours of training through hundreds of thousands of pitches accomplished over a year-round commitment. Getting some kid who just finished his basketball season a week ago is a lot different scenario.

                Originally posted by chisox2k5
                Do you think Roger Clemens is worrying about that stuff when hes in a game? No.
                No - but Roger Clemens isn't a 13-14 year old kid learning.

                Originally posted by chisox2k5
                There has to be a time where you put it all together, and if you are counting on a pitcher to put it all together for the first time in a game you are destined for failure.
                Agreed.

                Originally posted by chisox2k5
                You dont do sprints and your distance running on the same day. Do your 2-3 miles (not 1-2 thats not enough) after your bullpen or the day after your start. Then do 60 yard dashes (not 90 feet, thats not enough either) the next day or however you want to work it into your inbetween start or conditioning schedule.
                I have had a great deal of discussion about this over the years. I used to feel the same way, here's what I found...
                There are so many things to learn in the game of baseball and only 2 hours a day to do it. Why consume that time with running. Most kids already know how to do that. I DO HOWEVER expect them to be running on their own (every day), especially during the winter and early spring. There is only so much you can do in a single court gym. The shorter version of the running routine I listed above is enough to tell me who is and who is not running on their own.
                "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jake Patterson
                  Why consume that time with running. Most kids already know how to do that.
                  That is the attitude of a LOSER.

                  Unless you are a genetic Josh Beckett freak, then there is always something you can be doing to make yourself better if you want to make it to the top.

                  If thats not the attitude you have, and if you arent Josh Beckett, then get the **** outta my way (and no, that last line wasnt directed at you, thats the attitude you have to have)
                  Last edited by chisox2k5; 01-31-2006, 07:27 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jake Patterson
                    I have had a great deal of discussion about this over the years. I used to feel the same way, here's what I found...
                    There are so many things to learn in the game of baseball and only 2 hours a day to do it. Why consume that time with running. Most kids already know how to do that. I DO HOWEVER expect them to be running on their own (every day), especially during the winter and early spring. There is only so much you can do in a single court gym. The shorter version of the running routine I listed above is enough to tell me who is and who is not running on their own.
                    In addition, I would be very cautious about how much distance they run on a gym floor. The turns and surface are hard, just increasing danger of stress injuries.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by bbjunkie
                      In addition, I would be very cautious about how much distance they run on a gym floor. The turns and surface are hard, just increasing danger of stress injuries.
                      Agree.....
                      "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                      - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                      Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jake Patterson
                        I was discussing pre-season pitching routines with other coaches this evening. I am an advocate of adjusting the workout and throwing intensity versus throwing hard everyday and then adjusting schedules (i.e. Throw some every day of the week versus throw very hard on a few days per week.) I would of course adjust for arm fatigue.

                        Coaches: What do you do?
                        What are lead ins?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jake Patterson
                          I was discussing pre-season pitching routines with other coaches this evening. I am an advocate of adjusting the workout and throwing intensity versus throwing hard everyday and then adjusting schedules (i.e. Throw some every day of the week versus throw very hard on a few days per week.) I would of course adjust for arm fatigue.

                          Coaches: What do you do?
                          What are lead ups?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tominct
                            What are lead ups?
                            The sequence of stretching the throwing arm, short toss, longer toss, long toss, sometimes quick toss, etc. Some coaches start on one knee and then have the players stand.

                            I've heard it called different things. Warm ups, sequence drill, lead ups, etc.... Hope this helps.
                            "He who dares to teach, must never cease to learn."
                            - John Cotton Dana (1856–1929) - Offered to many by L. Olson - Iowa (Teacher)
                            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, it depends if they have thrown at all during the offseason. If they haven't, take it easy at first so they can get in the swing of things and so they can build intensity.

                              And about the whole "not worrying about correct mechanics thing", when your practicing, yes, focus on mechanics, but do so with game type intensity. You can't do bullpens at 60% intensity and expect the kids to be ready for 100% game type intensity for the game, it doesn't work that way. They will not become successful pitchers that way.
                              When your in a game, you can't worry about your mechanics, it will do the exact opposite of which you are trying to accomplish. If your worried about you gotta do this and that right, it's gonna mess you up because your focus isn't on the catcher and your strategy, it's on other things.
                              While I do prefer to interact with people in a gentle manner... I'm also not at all opposed to establishing my dominance in a reign of terror.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X