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Portable wooden pitchers mound

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  • Portable wooden pitchers mound

    Anyone build one on their own before? About a year ago I was at the local little league and saw a coach with a portable mound. The mound was two pieces and folded in half so it could be transported easily. When asking about it, he said he built himself. I probably should have asked for more detail but didn't. Now thinking about building something similar. Anyone else done this before and if so, have some specs to work off of?

  • #2
    I built a couple for my son's 12U team several years ago. I think I set it up to match a Bronco mound. If I remember correctly, 6" high, So I used a 2x6's to create the frame for the top of the mound. Since 2x6s are not 2" x 6" anymore, adding a piece of 1/2" plywood made it close enough to 6". I believe I made the mound 30" or 36" wide, I can't remember. The top of the mound was 2" from the back to the start of the slope. The slope of the mound is 12:1. I remember making the supports for the slope was the most difficult thing I had (3) 2" wide supports going the length of the slope. One on each side and one in the middle. I added some lawn mower wheels to the rear of the mound to make it a little easier to move around.

    The first one I made as one piece and it was a bear to transport/move. The head coach had a truck so he took care of it, but it was cumbersome. The second one I made I hinged halfway and it worked fine.

    The biggest issue I found was using the cheap astroturf stuff from Home Depot was a little slippery when landing improperly. But I think it helped a couple of the boys work on their weight transfer.

    I have seen some around hear that it looks like they used an aluminum frame around a sheet of plywood. This looks to be a lot lighter than the ones I made.

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    • #3
      I've had them but only for indoor use. Cumbersome. I know the portables are expensive but relatively easy to move about.
      Major Figure

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      • #4
        I built ours using two by eights and plywood. I cut it across and added a piano hinge and rolled fiberglass resin coating the whole thing before applying turf. Folded it was still a two man job to move, but it stayed outside and is still solid after ten years.
        Last edited by grayscoach; 09-08-2017, 02:35 PM. Reason: edited for bad grammar

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        • #5
          I never built one, but my most common concern/complaint with the ones that we played on, was that many of them were just too short length wise (I'm assuming because of the transportation/mobility needs of them). We played on several that were just that, a "mound", without any real landing zone (not sure if that is the right term), and when some of my taller pitchers were throwing from them, they were actually striding off of it, and landing on the level infield dirt in front of it. Not good for multiple reasons as you can imagine.

          So if anyone is going to build one (6" Bronco/12U height for instance) please taking into consideration all dimensions you're working with, and please try to make it as close to this diagram as humanly possible is all I'd say....

          moundprofile_06.jpg
          And yes, the "gradual rear slope" is just as important as well IMO, as some pitchers who do take a step back in their windup motion, don't appreciate falling off the back of the mound when they do so. Just my thoughts, I know others will disagree or have their own. Cool, cool...
          In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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          • #6
            I can't see how they're as expensive to build as the costs would indicate. But since people aren't building them right and left at home I guess I'm not seeing something. If you could get hold of a patch of that artificial grass that's better than that indoor/outdoor crap you're seeing on most portable mounds you'd be a step ahead. And as Mud is saying, the slope on those mounds is a little too steep.

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            • #7
              The size and slope are pretty simple math. The portability is the issue,

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              • #8
                I have a mound in my backyard. I was fortunate to acquire some old but decent driving range mats from a golf facility. There are 4 nice holes in these things which can be big nailed to the ground. I put it on a slope in the yard. I've also acquired discarded rubbers and home plates (some fields tend to put them in each year). I got an old, ripped up porta sock screen from a high school that I zip tied and put behind home plate. I took an old catchers's glove and zip tied it low, middle and also strung up a rectangular zone. To my everlasting detriment I discarded a life size plastic batter dummy so I'm on the lookout for one of those.

                This is definitely a high class operation. I had become the greatest strike thrower around up until recently. I just finished reading the autobiography of Rick Ankiel and now, for some reason, I can't hit squat.
                Major Figure

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by omg View Post
                  I have a mound in my backyard. I was fortunate to acquire some old but decent driving range mats from a golf facility. There are 4 nice holes in these things which can be big nailed to the ground. I put it on a slope in the yard. I've also acquired discarded rubbers and home plates (some fields tend to put them in each year). I got an old, ripped up porta sock screen from a high school that I zip tied and put behind home plate. I took an old catchers's glove and zip tied it low, middle and also strung up a rectangular zone. To my everlasting detriment I discarded a life size plastic batter dummy so I'm on the lookout for one of those.

                  This is definitely a high class operation. I had become the greatest strike thrower around up until recently. I just finished reading the autobiography of Rick Ankiel and now, for some reason, I can't hit squat.
                  If I can offer a suggestion, omg. You should consider a positional move out to CF.

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                  • #10
                    I built one three years ago. I used 2x10 PT and 3/4" CDX plywood for decking. IT IS HEAVY...but I've moved it a few times by myself. Flip it over and it's pretty easy to slide on grass. It has a 6' slope and the proper height. To load it, I put the light end on the tailgate and slide it in. Don't skimp on the bracing underneath and use screws to hold it together.
                    Last edited by 2022dad; 09-10-2017, 10:56 AM.
                    Put your junk in your pocket!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
                      I never built one, but my most common concern/complaint with the ones that we played on, was that many of them were just too short length wise (I'm assuming because of the transportation/mobility needs of them). We played on several that were just that, a "mound", without any real landing zone (not sure if that is the right term), and when some of my taller pitchers were throwing from them, they were actually striding off of it, and landing on the level infield dirt in front of it. Not good for multiple reasons as you can imagine.

                      So if anyone is going to build one (6" Bronco/12U height for instance) please taking into consideration all dimensions you're working with, and please try to make it as close to this diagram as humanly possible is all I'd say....

                      moundprofile_06.jpg
                      And yes, the "gradual rear slope" is just as important as well IMO, as some pitchers who do take a step back in their windup motion, don't appreciate falling off the back of the mound when they do so. Just my thoughts, I know others will disagree or have their own. Cool, cool...
                      totally agree. Can't stand the short mounds where the pitcher just lands in the dirt b/c his stride is more than a couple of feet. I built one out of some 2 by's and plywood. It's in 3 sections for a total of 9'. 6' for the ramp, 1' flat to the rubber and then 2' behind rubber -just flat though no rear ramp. I got a thick mat from Lowe or Menards for the ramp and some thin mat for the area around the rubber. It's kind of heavy -wheels would be a nice addition.....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post

                        If I can offer a suggestion, omg. You should consider a positional move out to CF.
                        Thanks but I'm kinda slow, to say the least.
                        Major Figure

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Contemplating ordering one of these.

                          https://playerschoicemounds.com/

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                          • #14
                            Seems reasonably priced, unless the shipping and handling is $1,000.00.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sparkny2 View Post
                              Seems reasonably priced, unless the shipping and handling is $1,000.00.
                              I think shipping is about $70 via UPS ground.

                              Comment

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