Announcement

Collapse

Updated Baseball Fever Policy

Baseball Fever Policy

I. Purpose of this announcement:

This announcement describes the policies pertaining to the operation of Baseball Fever.

Baseball Fever is a moderated baseball message board which encourages and facilitates research and information exchange among fans of our national pastime. The intent of the Baseball Fever Policy is to ensure that Baseball Fever remains an extremely high quality, extremely low "noise" environment.

Baseball Fever is administrated by three principal administrators:
webmaster - Baseball Fever Owner
The Commissioner - Baseball Fever Administrator
Macker - Baseball Fever Administrator

And a group of forum specific super moderators. The role of the moderator is to keep Baseball Fever smoothly and to screen posts for compliance with our policy. The moderators are ALL volunteer positions, so please be patient and understanding of any delays you might experience in correspondence.

II. Comments about our policy:

Any suggestions on this policy may be made directly to the webmaster.

III. Acknowledgments:

This document was based on a similar policy used by SABR.

IV. Requirements for participation on Baseball Fever:

Participation on Baseball Fever is available to all baseball fans with a valid email address, as verified by the forum's automated system, which then in turn creates a single validated account. Multiple accounts by a single user are prohibited.

By registering, you agree to adhere to the policies outlined in this document and to conduct yourself accordingly. Abuse of the forum, by repeated failure to abide by these policies, will result in your access being blocked to the forum entirely.

V. Baseball Fever Netiquette:

Participants at Baseball Fever are required to adhere to these principles, which are outlined in this section.
a. All posts to Baseball Fever should be written in clear, concise English, with proper grammar and accurate spelling. The use of abbreviations should be kept to a minimum; when abbreviation is necessary, they should be either well-known (such as etc.), or explained on their first use in your post.

b. Conciseness is a key attribute of a good post.

c. Quote only the portion of a post to which you are responding.

d. Standard capitalization and punctuation make a large difference in the readability of a post. TYPING IN ALL CAPITALS is considered to be "shouting"; it is a good practice to limit use of all capitals to words which you wish to emphasize.

e. It is our policy NOT to transmit any defamatory or illegal materials.

f. Personal attacks of any type against Baseball Fever readers will not be tolerated. In these instances the post will be copied by a moderator and/or administrator, deleted from the site, then sent to the member who made the personal attack via a Private Message (PM) along with a single warning. Members who choose to not listen and continue personal attacks will be banned from the site.

g. It is important to remember that many contextual clues available in face-to-face discussion, such as tone of voice and facial expression, are lost in the electronic forum. As a poster, try to be alert for phrasing that might be misinterpreted by your audience to be offensive; as a reader, remember to give the benefit of the doubt and not to take umbrage too easily. There are many instances in which a particular choice of words or phrasing can come across as being a personal attack where none was intended.

h. The netiquette described above (a-g) often uses the term "posts", but applies equally to Private Messages.

VI. Baseball Fever User Signature Policy

A signature is a piece of text that some members may care to have inserted at the end of ALL of their posts, a little like the closing of a letter. You can set and / or change your signature by editing your profile in the UserCP. Since it is visible on ALL your posts, the following policy must be adhered to:

Signature Composition
Font size limit: No larger than size 2 (This policy is a size 2)
Style: Bold and italics are permissible
Character limit: No more than 500 total characters
Lines: No more than 4 lines
Colors: Most colors are permissible, but those which are hard to discern against the gray background (yellow, white, pale gray) should be avoided
Images/Graphics: Allowed, but nothing larger than 20k and Content rules must be followed

Signature Content
No advertising is permitted
Nothing political or religious
Nothing obscene, vulgar, defamatory or derogatory
Links to personal blogs/websites are permissible - with the webmaster's written consent
A Link to your Baseball Fever Blog does not require written consent and is recommended
Quotes must be attributed. Non-baseball quotes are permissible as long as they are not religious or political

Please adhere to these rules when you create your signature. Failure to do so will result in a request to comply by a moderator. If you do not comply within a reasonable amount of time, the signature will be removed and / or edited by an Administrator. Baseball Fever reserves the right to edit and / or remove any or all of your signature line at any time without contacting the account holder.

VII. Appropriate and inappropriate topics for Baseball Fever:

Most concisely, the test for whether a post is appropriate for Baseball Fever is: "Does this message discuss our national pastime in an interesting manner?" This post can be direct or indirect: posing a question, asking for assistance, providing raw data or citations, or discussing and constructively critiquing existing posts. In general, a broad interpretation of "baseball related" is used.

Baseball Fever is not a promotional environment. Advertising of products, web sites, etc., whether for profit or not-for-profit, is not permitted. At the webmaster's discretion, brief one-time announcements for products or services of legitimate baseball interest and usefulness may be allowed. If advertising is posted to the site it will be copied by a moderator and/or administrator, deleted from the site, then sent to the member who made the post via a Private Message (PM) along with a single warning. Members who choose to not listen and continue advertising will be banned from the site. If the advertising is spam-related, pornography-based, or a "visit-my-site" type post / private message, no warning at all will be provided, and the member will be banned immediately without a warning.

It is considered appropriate to post a URL to a page which specifically and directly answers a question posted on the list (for example, it would be permissible to post a link to a page containing home-road splits, even on a site which has advertising or other commercial content; however, it would not be appropriate to post the URL of the main page of the site). The site reserves the right to limit the frequency of such announcements by any individual or group.

In keeping with our test for a proper topic, posting to Baseball Fever should be treated as if you truly do care. This includes posting information that is, to the best of your knowledge, complete and accurate at the time you post. Any errors or ambiguities you catch later should be acknowledged and corrected in the thread, since Baseball Fever is sometimes considered to be a valuable reference for research information.

VIII. Role of the moderator:

When a post is submitted to Baseball Fever, it is forwarded by the server automatically and seen immediately. The moderator may:
a. Leave the thread exactly like it was submitted. This is the case 95% of the time.

b. Immediately delete the thread as inappropriate for Baseball Fever. Examples include advertising, personal attacks, or spam. This is the case 1% of the time.

c. Move the thread. If a member makes a post about the Marlins in the Yankees forum it will be moved to the appropriate forum. This is the case 3% of the time.

d. Edit the message due to an inappropriate item. This is the case 1% of the time. There have been new users who will make a wonderful post, then add to their signature line (where your name / handle appears) a tagline that is a pure advertisement. This tagline will be removed, a note will be left in the message so he/she is aware of the edit, and personal contact will be made to the poster telling them what has been edited and what actions need to be taken to prevent further edits.

The moderators perform no checks on posts to verify factual or logical accuracy. While he/she may point out gross errors in factual data in replies to the thread, the moderator does not act as an "accuracy" editor. Also moderation is not a vehicle for censorship of individuals and/or opinions, and the moderator's decisions should not be taken personally.

IX. Legal aspects of participation in Baseball Fever:

By submitting a post to Baseball Fever, you grant Baseball Fever permission to distribute your message to the forum. Other rights pertaining to the post remain with the ORIGINAL author, and you may not redistribute or retransmit any posts by any others, in whole or in part, without the express consent of the original author.

The messages appearing on Baseball Fever contain the opinions and views of their respective authors and are not necessarily those of Baseball Fever, or of the Baseball Almanac family of sites.

Sincerely,

Sean Holtz, Webmaster of Baseball Almanac & Baseball Fever
www.baseball-almanac.com | www.baseball-fever.com
"Baseball Almanac: Sharing Baseball. Sharing History."
See more
See less

The effect of bad calls on pitches not

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Originally posted by scorekeeper View Post
    While I don’t believe pitchers will ever have the ability to hit precise spots with either consistence or precision, I do believe getting direct feedback during practices(bullpens) would help with a reality check. Having coaches and/or catchers telling pitchers what a great pitch they just threw or how well they hit a spot doesn’t help because it often isn’t true.
    I believe in a pitcher who hit precise spots with consistency and precision. Not 100% of the time, but pretty darn close to it. His name was Jamie Moyer.

    I have always wondered why nobody ever attempts to emulate what he did. Not to derail the discussion, but I read his book and adopted a drill of his called "21" where the idea is to throw more precisely to the glove than your partner - if you have to move the glove to catch the ball, you lose a point.

    Jamie Moyer always won that game against anyone he faced, of course . . .



    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
      Here's where I see the biggest hole. What's to stop the home team video monitor from alerting their manager immediately when they see a missed call that would benefit him, and simply have him challenge it right away?

      Now would the visiting team be privy to the same information immediately, or would they have to have a guy in the booth who only sees it when the TV broadcast replays it, and by that time it'd probably be too late?

      I just don't see why, if we're gonna us technology to challenge questionable B/S...well then why not just let technology call all of them, and not hassle with it any longer.
      You're right, there are obstacles to easy administration. For instance, in tennis it actually goes very smoothly. (I'm not a big tennis guy but will occasionally catch 10 minutes or so of a match.) The player makes the decision to challenge. It's eliminated McEnroe style outbursts. But tennis isn't a team sport. If you let the batter make the challenge he's speaking for 25 players and a manager.

      I do kind of like the challenge format they have so far though. Really cut down on the arguing.

      Comment


      • #78
        Originally posted by real green View Post
        …Regarding looking up the stats missed balls vs strikes of MLB doesn't sound interesting to me. What have you found. I didn't see it in the article posted regarding which is missed more often. Of the 15% missed calls which were called wrong more often, balls or strike? That would solve our little debate. It would make sense to me if umps missed more strikes than balls than an automated zone will benefit pitching and vise versa.
        Well, I don’t have access to that data. I may do that in the future but I doubt it because it really doesn’t mean anything to me as far as the “argument” goes. I know even the very best umpires miss what I consider to be too many calls, and don’t really care if they benefit pitchers or hitters more.
        The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by JoeG View Post
          I believe in a pitcher who hit precise spots with consistency and precision. Not 100% of the time, but pretty darn close to it. His name was Jamie Moyer.

          I have always wondered why nobody ever attempts to emulate what he did. Not to derail the discussion, but I read his book and adopted a drill of his called "21" where the idea is to throw more precisely to the glove than your partner - if you have to move the glove to catch the ball, you lose a point.

          Jamie Moyer always won that game against anyone he faced, of course . . .
          I certainly believe there are pitchers who do much better at it than others, and Moyer may well have been the best at it. But to me it’s ludicrous to believe any pitcher has or will ever hit precise spots (the size of a silver dollar) during a game because too many things are working against it. If pitchers tried to throw the same pitch to the same spot, and he threw off a mound that didn’t change with every pitch, and didn’t have to contend with nature, and every ball was exactly the same, and he was never affected by fatigue, and many other things, I think he could be a lot more accurate than they are.

          But consider this. Darts is a game where the thrower uses implements weighted as perfectly as possible, thrown from a flat hard surface that doesn’t change, to a board 7’9.25” away and whose center is 5’8” in the air. They get to throw 3 darts in quick succession so muscle memory has more influence, and they don’t use an explosive movement of the entire body trying to get as much velocity or spin as possible. I’ve thrown more than few darts in my time and can tell ya, I’d hit a spot the size of a nickel at a much higher rate than any pitcher would hit a spot the size of a silver dollar, but anything more than 90% would make me the best thrower of darts in the world.

          If you want to test what I say, create a target of some sort, put a pitcher on the mound and have him try to hit it using different pitches while moving the target to different locations.

          I don’t say these things to denigrate pitchers at all. The worst pitcher will almost always be more accurate than most other players, let alone people who don’t play the game, but there are physical limits to contend with.
          The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

          Comment


          • #80
            SK, this whole debate developed over your question if there was any other argument other than tradition. I presented a viable argument. There will be side effects that have to be considered. Look at replay. We watched a side effect of replay last night in the 8th when the runner was back picked at first. No one anticipated how often a runner comes off a bag he reached safely before the ball during a slide. Now with instant replay and slow motion it happens often and has changed the game.

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by real green View Post
              SK, this whole debate developed over your question if there was any other argument other than tradition. I presented a viable argument. There will be side effects that have to be considered. Look at replay. We watched a side effect of replay last night in the 8th when the runner was back picked at first. No one anticipated how often a runner comes off a bag he reached safely before the ball during a slide. Now with instant replay and slow motion it happens often and has changed the game.
              Nice example, RG, of an unintended implication. All of a sudden the pop-up slide that used to be taught as an advantageous way for a runner to go into a bag is suddenly detrimental due to replay. If replay stays the same, it's likely that the next generation will be actively discouraged to pop-up slide because of the millisecond they leave the bag when popping up.

              And no, I'm not suggesting that whatever that was that Lobaton did yesterday was anything close to a well-taught pop-up slide, but the point remains: we've seen plenty of situations where a pop-up slide caused a "safe" runner to get wrung-up on replay.

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by scorekeeper View Post

                I certainly believe there are pitchers who do much better at it than others, and Moyer may well have been the best at it. But to me it’s ludicrous to believe any pitcher has or will ever hit precise spots (the size of a silver dollar) during a game because too many things are working against it. If pitchers tried to throw the same pitch to the same spot, and he threw off a mound that didn’t change with every pitch, and didn’t have to contend with nature, and every ball was exactly the same, and he was never affected by fatigue, and many other things, I think he could be a lot more accurate than they are.

                But consider this. Darts is a game where the thrower uses implements weighted as perfectly as possible, thrown from a flat hard surface that doesn’t change, to a board 7’9.25” away and whose center is 5’8” in the air. They get to throw 3 darts in quick succession so muscle memory has more influence, and they don’t use an explosive movement of the entire body trying to get as much velocity or spin as possible. I’ve thrown more than few darts in my time and can tell ya, I’d hit a spot the size of a nickel at a much higher rate than any pitcher would hit a spot the size of a silver dollar, but anything more than 90% would make me the best thrower of darts in the world.

                If you want to test what I say, create a target of some sort, put a pitcher on the mound and have him try to hit it using different pitches while moving the target to different locations.

                I don’t say these things to denigrate pitchers at all. The worst pitcher will almost always be more accurate than most other players, let alone people who don’t play the game, but there are physical limits to contend with.
                Why are you insisting on the precision of a silver dollar? Doesn't have to be quite that precise. If you're confident that the strike zone ends at a certain spot, you aim for maybe 1 inch inside of that part of the zone and you are happy if the ball lands within 2 inches of that spot (even if it's an inch outside the zone and called for a ball, that's a good result as the batter may end up swinging at it).

                I watched a couple Moyer pitching games where they kept showing the spots he was hitting with those pretty strike zone charts on TV. Was pretty unbelievable to see every single pitch hitting the edge of the strike zone somewhere. Sometimes they'd miss by half an inch or an inch and it would be called a ball but to me that's a great result if most of the pitches end up as either a strike at a corner or called for a ball because it misses by an inch.

                I have more optimism than you do about precision. An interesting thing that happens in our area is how umpires call the strike zone:

                Kid umpires in our rec league our urged to call a very liberal outside corner (2-3 inches outside). Many adult umpires do it too in travel ball. So pitchers with better control around here are used to aiming for the outside corner. Sure they miss a bit of the time - none of them are as good as Jamie Moyer! But what is interesting is to see the incredible impact of the game when an umpire calls a very strict strike zone, that does not give an outside 2-3 inches or give any kind of extra inches anywhere. The whole game changes. Not only do pitchers issue more walks, but hitters get far more hits.

                The pitchers most impacted are the ones whose main (and pretty much only) pitching strategy was to throw pitches to the outside part of the plate. When umpires take that away, their fastballs become pretty easy to hit.

                You like to quantify - an interesting exercise related to this discussion is to break each individual pitcher performance into two categories - ones with umpires who have big zones (typically outside 2-3 inches added) vs those with strict zones. You probably would need a third category to for "other" so that umpires not fitting either of these categories are removed from the data set. I'm 99% sure I know what the result of this analysis would indicate.

                Comment


                • #83
                  Originally posted by real green View Post
                  SK, this whole debate developed over your question if there was any other argument other than tradition. I presented a viable argument. There will be side effects that have to be considered. Look at replay. We watched a side effect of replay last night in the 8th when the runner was back picked at first. No one anticipated how often a runner comes off a bag he reached safely before the ball during a slide. Now with instant replay and slow motion it happens often and has changed the game.
                  How has it changed the game other than to make it better? Some people may not care for the additional time it takes for IR, but in the end everyone likes “getting it right”. What we’ve been talking about takes no additional time and calls are made much more accurately and consistently. So why would that change the game other than to improve it?
                  The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Originally posted by scorekeeper View Post

                    How has it changed the game other than to make it better? Some people may not care for the additional time it takes for IR, but in the end everyone likes “getting it right”. What we’ve been talking about takes no additional time and calls are made much more accurately and consistently. So why would that change the game other than to improve it?
                    And the circle continues! Arg.... I don't find last night's call in the 8th an improvement. By the rule he is out and can be proven via slow motion BUT I don't think that was the intent of the rule. He returned to the bag safely before the ball. It has changed the way the game is played at the MLB level. No other level would that runner be out. It has changed how runners have to slide. Some runners wear an extended mitt to help counter it and protect there hand. Runners are starting a to do an imitation of the matrix to avoid tags. I don't care for these changes (side effects) caused by replay. I don't think it matches the intent of the rule to reach base safely. I can live with this side effect and feel the benefits out way the side effects of replay.
                    There will be negative side effects of calling an automated zone. I can live with those side effects and will still watch the game and find it entertaining.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Originally posted by real green View Post
                      And the circle continues! Arg.... I don't find last night's call in the 8th an improvement. By the rule he is out and can be proven via slow motion BUT I don't think that was the intent of the rule. He returned to the bag safely before the ball. It has changed the way the game is played at the MLB level. No other level would that runner be out. It has changed how runners have to slide. Some runners wear an extended mitt to help counter it and protect there hand. Runners are starting a to do an imitation of the matrix to avoid tags. I don't care for these changes (side effects) caused by replay. I don't think it matches the intent of the rule to reach base safely. I can live with this side effect and feel the benefits out way the side effects of replay.

                      There will be negative side effects of calling an automated zone. I can live with those side effects and will still watch the game and find it entertaining.
                      Those changes aren't caused by replay! If umpires could make those calls accurately, the same thing would happen. I don’t know what the intent of the rule to reach base safely was, but I doubt it was well thought out considering every possible event then and in the future. But, then again, you’re giving an example of IR which isn’t at all what we’re talking about.

                      There is no replay! There’s no difference between an umpire making the call on a pitch not swung at and a machine doing it, other than the machine will do it better. It will not only be done more accurately, it won’t be influenced by anything other than the location of the ball in relation to the strike zone while it’s over the plate. No more being influenced by the catcher’s ability to frame a pitch because the pitch will have been called long before the ball gets near the catcher, as it should be, which is really cheating the hitter who correctly didn’t swing. No more politically correct calls because the umpires don’t want to put up with griping even though the pitch was correctly called. No more delayed calls while the umpire is trying to get straight in his mind what he saw.

                      It’s a simple ‘1’ it is or ‘0’ it isn’t, computed within nanoseconds of the ball passing the plate. If the pitcher’s able to touch the strike zone and the batter doesn’t swing, he gets rewarded, and if he doesn’t he gets penalized every time the same way. If the batter doesn’t swing and the ball touches the zone he gets penalized and if it does, he gets rewarded the same way every time as well. Pitchers will still be able to slam down the rosin bag and hitters will still be able to roll their eyes, but it will be because they’re embarrassed at their failure, not that the umpire MAY have failed.

                      What we’re really talking about is “fairness” which it seems many people don’t want to see or are afraid of. After all, life isn’t fair, so why should anything in it be? Now me, I like the players being accountable for what they do, but right now it’s some bastardization of the umpire’s performance coupled with the players. I love the umpires and respect what they do, but show me an ump who doesn’t want to never miss a call and I’ll show you an ump who should find something else to do.
                      The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        This article is almost 4 years old, but I think it answers at least a few questions.

                        https://www.beyondtheboxscore.com/20...ls-and-strikes

                        This one is only 2 years old.

                        http://www.star-telegram.com/sports/...105378146.html

                        Last edited by scorekeeper; 10-13-2017, 02:32 PM.
                        The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Well you are correct on replay, the cause is his foot coming off the bag. What replay allowed is the ability to spot it. No ump without assistance would ever make that call. I think it should be addressed because it's a change in the game I dont care for due to the implementation of replay. They could add a rule to clarify. Something like if a player reaches the bag safely he cannot be put out until he purposely leaves the safety of the bag excluding over sliding the bag which would put the runner at risk.

                          Of course we are not talking about the merit of replay, I only used it as an example of how using technology can change how the game is played. I have a hard time understanding how that is not very obvious to you.

                          The fact is implementing an automated zone will change how balls and strikes are called. I am in favor of a true zone being called and the use of the technology. How that change impacts the game is unknown.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by real green View Post
                            Well you are correct on replay, the cause is his foot coming off the bag. What replay allowed is the ability to spot it. No ump without assistance would ever make that call. I think it should be addressed because it's a change in the game I dont care for due to the implementation of replay. They could add a rule to clarify. Something like if a player reaches the bag safely he cannot be put out until he purposely leaves the safety of the bag excluding over sliding the bag which would put the runner at risk.
                            This is kind of funny when you think about it, because now you're wanting to change the rules because you believe the game has changed because of technology. When in fact, all it was was a umpire missing a call under the current rule set that technology got correct.

                            So now if you change that rule for whatever reason(s), players will simply change the way they play the game in order to take advantage of that change, and the never ending cycle of hypotheticals, and changes continue.


                            Of course we are not talking about the merit of replay, I only used it as an example of how using technology can change how the game is played. I have a hard time understanding how that is not very obvious to you.

                            The fact is implementing an automated zone will change how balls and strikes are called. I am in favor of a true zone being called and the use of the technology. How that change impacts the game is unknown.
                            I don't think anyone's arguing that the game won't change somewhat, I think the argument has been sliced down to its most basic element that we all agree on....that we want the best method available for getting the calls correct, and as far as I know...that means taking the "human error" portion out of it when possible/available.

                            Will the players have to a make some changes or accommodations for it? Of course they will, but I'd bet by the All-star break of the first season of implementation...we'll hardly remember that HPUs used to call the B/S on their own, and will be pleased to see no more pitchers glaring at umpires, or hitters throwing their bats and/or helmets down in disgust, and getting ejected...only penalizing the fans who paid good money to see the best of the best compete on any given day.

                            Heck, IMO for what that's worth...either we use all the available technology to call the game correctly, or we get rid of it all together (ie. instant replay challenges)...and stop pretending we "just want to get it right", and go back to the "good old days" when "tradition" said the umpires' decisions stood...right, wrong, or indifferent.
                            In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Originally posted by real green View Post
                              Well you are correct on replay, the cause is his foot coming off the bag. What replay allowed is the ability to spot it. No ump without assistance would ever make that call. I think it should be addressed because it's a change in the game I dont care for due to the implementation of replay. They could add a rule to clarify. Something like if a player reaches the bag safely he cannot be put out until he purposely leaves the safety of the bag excluding over sliding the bag which would put the runner at risk.

                              Of course we are not talking about the merit of replay, I only used it as an example of how using technology can change how the game is played. I have a hard time understanding how that is not very obvious to you.
                              I don’t see it so much as changing how the game is played as much as it forces players to not “cheat”. I think it’s great that the ol’ phantom tag at 2nd on a DP is now a thing of the past at the ML level.

                              And I have a hard time understanding how you think calls made incorrectly make the game better.

                              The fact is implementing an automated zone will change how balls and strikes are called. I am in favor of a true zone being called and the use of the technology. How that change impacts the game is unknown.
                              Will it change how balls and strikes are called? Absolutely! Pitches not swung at will be called much more accurately! If it ends up changing the game in a way the owners don’t like, all they gotta do is change the rules.
                              The pitcher who’s afraid to throw strikes, will soon be standing in the shower with the hitter who's afraid to swing.

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Phantom tag is a great example and wasn't a cheat. It became accepted through time as way to prevent injuries to middle infielders. Once the phantom tag was no longer called they had to create a new rule to protect the infielders. The Utley Rule. As far as I am concerned, it wasn't broken in the first place.

                                This is just a game. It's fine to want perfection but I can accept the imperfection and move on. Accepting the fact that it's not perfect is a great life lesson that comes from sports. Yes, the lesson we try and teach our kids. Even when you know the ump is wrong, chalk it up to he is just human trying to get it right and accept he, like you, are not perfect and move on. It will balance out over a game a season a career. Calls will go in your favor and against you, just like life, learn to play through them.

                                I never said or implied that incorrect calls make the game better. I just don't think they hurt the game.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X