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Driveline Velocity and Arm Care Starter Kit

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  • Driveline Velocity and Arm Care Starter Kit

    So, this is what the boy wants for Xmas. (Bless him,)
    I don't know much about it. Do you need to throw against a hard wall (like the boy says) or can you throw into a Bownet or something?
    Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

  • #2
    You'll need both. There are some repetitive throws with the plyocare balls so it's nice to not have to retrieve the ball each time (unless you want to buy multiples of each $$$) and just have it bounce back to you. We made a throwing wall in our basement with a sheet of plywood, some dense foam and a thick rug (the latter two help dampen the noise). But there are other exercises with weighted balls where a net would be preferred.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by bluedawg View Post
      We made a throwing wall in our basement with a sheet of plywood, some dense foam and a thick rug (the latter two help dampen the noise).
      What kind of foam? How thick?

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      • #4
        you can throw the plyo balls into a net too if it is strong enough.
        I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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        • #5
          My kids (13 and 10) follows the htkc youth program and uses the weighted balls it in my basement during the winter. I have a mattress that I propped up to a wall for the weighted ball work. I use a sock with velcro strap around the wrist for the long toss. They use a combination of a ceiling mark and imagination for the distances as they can do a pretty decent job of associating the "feel" of the effort relative to distance. This is the compromise for people who live in cold weather states and don't want to spend $$ on an indoor facility or trainer.

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          • #6
            When I was growing up I never bought baseballs but instead would go to the park and get the ones people would hit into the woods. Even after leaving them out in the sun for a while, some were still water logged and weighed what felt like about 10 lbs. We would still use them..guess we were ahead of our time ; )

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            • #7
              Francis7

              So, this is what the boy wants for Xmas. (Bless him,)
              Tell him even if he is not a pitcher, this is the way to go.

              I currently have 6 field players on our 120 day High school baseball pitchers interval training program. They only throw fastballs unlike the pitchers that must perform their pitch types with the release heavy balls and wrist weight holds..

              Do you need to throw against a hard wall (like the boy says) or can you throw into a Bownet or something?
              Pick your poison, it's been done a hundred ways and is still evolving. yes to the hard wall, the balls are designed for that. I personally like a platen shelf to catch the second bounce belt high.

              Let me speak for Kyle here, I think he is generally reluctant to add in here and define things because it's business and does not want to alarm others, here. This is to important to not discuss. He may have downloadable simple plans for you guys ?

              Rebound walls need to meet their specific requirement.

              If the rebound wall is specifically for “Dead blow balls” (Plyo and others 3oz. to 4.4 lb ) the wall can be built with ¾ exterior grade plywood with a protective or sound dampening front laminate.

              If you use rubber to receive the blow it will degrade the ball quicker.

              If you use brass balls and lead ( 2 lbs to 9 lbs) the challenge to get a lesser sounding board that can withstand the punishment that takes a more robust actuating structure or beefed up wood.

              This is one of our biggest challenges logistically when my guys turn biologically 16 they get off the plyo balls and start to go heavier. You should see some of the contraptions that my clients come up with.
              Last edited by Dirtberry; 11-16-2017, 06:51 PM.
              Primum non nocere

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              • #8
                We went to driveline facility in Raleigh, NC and I modeled exactly what they use. Total cost in materials was about 50 bucks or so. You go to an agro supply type store and get a "horse mat". It's a large, friggin heavy, rubber mat that's probably close to an inch thick. Cost 40 bucks. I bought one 2x4, cut it in half and matched it up to the top of the mat. Drill 3 holes and bolt the 2x4's together with the mat in the middle. Then drill 2 holes to hang in from your ceiling. I used para cord and basic eyelets you buy at home depot/lowes. You don't want to hang the mat just by itself because its own weight will rip the holes out. I'll be glad to take a pic and post if anyone wants to see. Beware, this is for a garage or basement setup. The mat STINKS of that rubber smell. It works amazingly well though, should last a lifetime.

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                • #9
                  Thanks to ALL for the most appreciated feedback! ClayAdams - would love to see those pictures!!
                  Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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                  • #10
                    Regarding Plyos, I'd throw them into a wall or mat vs a net (we have a mat against our basement wall). To me, the sound feedback is important for intent. Like pitching into a net vs a catcher's glove or an "advanced command trainer."
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                    • #11
                      Here ya go Francis, hope it's clear enough since it's dark out. I can take a better pic with an actual camera tomorrow if that's not good enough.
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                      • #12
                        Thanks Clay! And, thanks McLoven.
                        Clay, anything on the bottom of the mat? Or, does it just hang down on it's own?
                        Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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                        • #13
                          Our house is older and the way the earlier owners set it up created a tandem style garage, so we kind of have a back area of our garage that could be used for a workshop, etc. So, we created an area for baseball. I initially built something on a wall in our garage as mentioned earlier, put up 2x4 framing and covered it with plywood and then wrestling mats. It works well, but actually provides a bit too much rebound for baseballs(area isn't huge so they release the balls closer to the wall), and even plyo balls to an extent. It works well for medicine balls and such though, so we use it.

                          What Clay posted is somewhat the direction I wanted to go after that, as I think it's ideal. It's think and heavy enough that it can just hang down and be OK. A little give is good in that you want it to move in order to help absorb some of the throw.

                          This was the problem with mine, it wouldn't absorb enough, so the balls, especially baseballs would still come back too fast. Due to the space I had and ceiling in my garage, I couldn't hang anything that would give enough room to throw, so I just bought a simple 4x6 net and hung a Pitching Pad onto it. Pitching Pad is 4" thick foam and it works great now. They can move it around as needed, etc. We can take it outside if we want, though I do have a bownet which it a little larger and is a sock net so a little easier for the outdoor stuff. I added a stock picture of that just so you know what I am talking about. The numbers do help with command(kids always throw to a target), though if I had a simple mat I could easily spray paint some circles and such on there.

                          However, if I could redo it all, I would do something more similar to what Clay had, add some targets easily, and saved some good money in the process. Live and learn...

                          As I mentioned, I have a couple of Bownets and I don't think they would work well for plyo balls and work. As McLoven said, the feedback is nice on the sound and I personally have found that having a target is good. The Bownet, while you could secure it down of course, would fly back on every throw.

                          As an aside, McLoven mentioned the Adv Command Trainer. We have one, and they do like it, and I also think it's a good tool. A catcher would be great of course, but in light of that, trying to hit that small target is helpful.
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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                            Thanks Clay! And, thanks McLoven.
                            Clay, anything on the bottom of the mat? Or, does it just hang down on it's own?
                            I have a bungee cord on the bottom that connects to a 45lb weight. Baseballs and the lower weight balls barely make it move, but the 4 and 2lb balls will get it swaying. Keep in mind, this mat weighs around 100lbs, and it's rubber, so it absorbs some serious blows. The bigger balls provide enough "push" to make it sway, and the bungee cord keeps it from swaying more than a foot or so.

                            In regard to Frank's post above mine, there's very little bounce back. With a baseball at full force, it'll bounce maybe a couple feet off the mat. It just absorbs so much energy. Like I said, this is the exact setup that they use in the Raleigh driveline facility, so I just did what they did and it was cheap!

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                            • #15
                              Thanks Frank!
                              Clay - how did you fasten the weight at the bottom (of the mat)? Cord through holes?
                              Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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