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One major difference between a good volunteer coach and a good paid coach

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  • One major difference between a good volunteer coach and a good paid coach

    In general, assuming they're equally competent, a volunteer coach is more likely to dedicate 100% than a paid coach because at some point the paid coach realizes that his salary represents a very low hourly wage, which saps his willingness to provide a fanatical level of devotion to his job.

    Last edited by skipper5; 06-06-2018, 09:11 PM.
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  • #2
    Unless the paid coach isn't doing it for the money, but rather for the love of the game, and coaching it. I either donated my HS coaching stipends back to the school, or gave them to my ACs who got paid less than I did, and really needed it being in college, or having recently just graduated from it, and were trying to get into the profession.
    In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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    • #3
      Originally posted by skipper5 View Post
      In general, assuming they're equally competent, a volunteer coach is more likely to dedicate 100% than a paid coach because at some point the paid coach realizes that his salary represents a very low hourly wage, which saps his willingness to provide a fanatical level of devotion to his job.
      I am one of the lowest paid coaches at our HS coaching softball. I hope I still give it all. IMHO, you have both volunteer coaches and paid coaches be both excellent and terrible. The broad brush doesn't work.
      Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

      I am an ex expert. I've done this long enough to know that those who think that they know it all, know nothing.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by skipper5 View Post
        In general, assuming they're equally competent, a volunteer coach is more likely to dedicate 100% than a paid coach because at some point the paid coach realizes that his salary represents a very low hourly wage, which saps his willingness to provide a fanatical level of devotion to his job.
        a better coach is usually more efficient and requires less effort/time -volunteer or paid. Volunteer coach probably has a regular job and can't devote 100% time unless of course they're independently wealthy (or their spouse is). Paid coaches are often trying to prove themselves to move up the coaching ladder to better schools/programs. That's the incentive. Doubt many of them do it for the money. That would be stupid (unless they're paid more than I think).

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        • #5
          Well are we talking like preteen travel here or HS ball?

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          • #6
            The coach that has no relation to any kid on the team is more likely to dedicate 100% to the entire teams performance and development than the coach who is related to a player on the team. Like most generalizations, this isnt always true, but we've all seen it more times than not.
            Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

              a better coach is usually more efficient and requires less effort/time -volunteer or paid. Volunteer coach probably has a regular job and can't devote 100% time unless of course they're independently wealthy (or their spouse is). Paid coaches are often trying to prove themselves to move up the coaching ladder to better schools/programs. That's the incentive. Doubt many of them do it for the money. That would be stupid (unless they're paid more than I think).
              The paid coach had better have a "regular job" and can't devote 100% of his time either. The stipend doesn't really cover jack.

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              • #8
                volunteer coach is usually a dad, and daddy balls. Daddy balling either means he holds his kid to a higher standard (which can be uncomfortable for his kid), he puts more effort developing them, or he plays them more at specialized positions (like Domingo Ayala coach's kid). There are a few dads who do not daddy ball, but that is the exception rather than the rule from what I have seen. I prefer a good coach who is not affiliated, but then again they are hard to find, and there are multiple good dads who can coach.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pthawaii View Post
                  The coach that has no relation to any kid on the team is more likely to dedicate 100% to the entire teams performance and development than the coach who is related to a player on the team. Like most generalizations, this isnt always true, but we've all seen it more times than not.
                  I've seen both ways. I've seen teams taken over by coaches with no kids on the team that were great but I've also seen a ton of coaches terrified of showing their kid favoritism. I usually was. I remember one year me and the guy I talked into being my assistant would bench our sons from time to time just to get other kids more playing time and we'd kind of look at each other and laugh like "this sucks". I guess we wanted to have it in our back pocket though if somebody complained about playing time.

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                  • #10
                    Some of each are good.
                    efastball.com - hitting and pitching fact checker

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by skipper5 View Post
                      In general, assuming they're equally competent, a volunteer coach is more likely to dedicate 100% than a paid coach because at some point the paid coach realizes that his salary represents a very low hourly wage, which saps his willingness to provide a fanatical level of devotion to his job.
                      When I made this post, I had recently spoken to parents of a couple of JV players at two different high schools in my area.
                      Apparently quite a few games got rained out.
                      JV rain-outs often don't get made up. I'm fine with that.
                      What I'm not fine with is that when JV games get rained out, the coaches (who are paid a small stipend) send the players home instead of finding a spot (a classroom; a locker room; a dugout) where they could spend, say, an hour a half with a "classroom session". It could be as simple as watching video together on a laptop.
                      Or: If it's not raining hard, they could find a patch of grass where they could hold a mini-practice using dimple balls (reg. balls would get soggy).
                      Getting wet is not a problem. Falling down on wet grass is not a problem. Soccer players do it all the time.
                      My point is: Do something.
                      I'm not a coach-basher. Far from it. But I've got to call a spade a spade.
                      Btw, I've practiced many times over the years in the rain, sometimes in a parking lot.
                      I've got no patience for wimps, and no patience for coaches who aren't dedicated to using every possible opportunity to improve their players.



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                      • #12
                        Our JV team practiced in the gym if a game was rained out. Rarely had a day off other than Sundays.
                        WAR EAGLE!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Flush View Post
                          Our JV team practiced in the gym if a game was rained out. Rarely had a day off other than Sundays.
                          same here. even the freshman team still holds practices

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by skipper5 View Post

                            When I made this post, I had recently spoken to parents of a couple of JV players at two different high schools in my area.
                            Apparently quite a few games got rained out.
                            JV rain-outs often don't get made up. I'm fine with that.
                            What I'm not fine with is that when JV games get rained out, the coaches (who are paid a small stipend) send the players home instead of finding a spot (a classroom; a locker room; a dugout) where they could spend, say, an hour a half with a "classroom session". It could be as simple as watching video together on a laptop.
                            Or: If it's not raining hard, they could find a patch of grass where they could hold a mini-practice using dimple balls (reg. balls would get soggy).
                            Getting wet is not a problem. Falling down on wet grass is not a problem. Soccer players do it all the time.
                            My point is: Do something.
                            I'm not a coach-basher. Far from it. But I've got to call a spade a spade.
                            Btw, I've practiced many times over the years in the rain, sometimes in a parking lot.
                            I've got no patience for wimps, and no patience for coaches who aren't dedicated to using every possible opportunity to improve their players.


                            All great points. We have a very tight gym schedule now. It is not like it was even 5 years ago where the area where the indoor cage is goes automatically to softball and baseball. So, this year, we did a lot of what you suggested with video. We did a lot with the board and discussing bunt coverage. There really isn't a reason a coach can not get a classroom. We sent our JV home two times this year. On both occasions, there were other things in play for example, I had a parent meeting and so we only had one coach available.
                            Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

                            I am an ex expert. I've done this long enough to know that those who think that they know it all, know nothing.

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                            • #15
                              I've seen JV coaches cut kids loose so they can have more time to prep for a project or study for a test. Some of them are teachers so they know the academic schedule.

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