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One major difference between a good volunteer coach and a good paid coach

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  • #16
    Originally posted by skipper5 View Post

    When I made this post, I had recently spoken to parents of a couple of JV players at two different high schools in my area.
    Apparently quite a few games got rained out.
    JV rain-outs often don't get made up. I'm fine with that.
    What I'm not fine with is that when JV games get rained out, the coaches (who are paid a small stipend) send the players home instead of finding a spot (a classroom; a locker room; a dugout) where they could spend, say, an hour a half with a "classroom session". It could be as simple as watching video together on a laptop.
    Or: If it's not raining hard, they could find a patch of grass where they could hold a mini-practice using dimple balls (reg. balls would get soggy).
    Getting wet is not a problem. Falling down on wet grass is not a problem. Soccer players do it all the time.
    My point is: Do something.
    I'm not a coach-basher. Far from it. But I've got to call a spade a spade.
    Btw, I've practiced many times over the years in the rain, sometimes in a parking lot.
    I've got no patience for wimps, and no patience for coaches who aren't dedicated to using every possible opportunity to improve their players.


    Nowadays with the abundant quality short you tube videos and the large smart board screens a class room session would have a lot of value. I'm sure the good coaches do this (or tweet short videos out).

    Got to have the "rain" balls. I use Kenko- 50 of them.

    Go over signals, conditioning- I have a list of options if it rains. Time to work on some core fundamentals that you don't do when you have a nice beautiful field.

    On the flip side there are definitely times when a day off is more productive.
    Major Figure

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    • #17
      Originally posted by skipper5 View Post

      When I made this post, I had recently spoken to parents of a couple of JV players at two different high schools in my area.
      Apparently quite a few games got rained out.
      JV rain-outs often don't get made up. I'm fine with that.
      What I'm not fine with is that when JV games get rained out, the coaches (who are paid a small stipend) send the players home instead of finding a spot (a classroom; a locker room; a dugout) where they could spend, say, an hour a half with a "classroom session". It could be as simple as watching video together on a laptop.
      Or: If it's not raining hard, they could find a patch of grass where they could hold a mini-practice using dimple balls (reg. balls would get soggy).
      Getting wet is not a problem. Falling down on wet grass is not a problem. Soccer players do it all the time.
      My point is: Do something.
      Agree 100%....with the classroom part, as I was only able to secure the gym just one time, and that was as if I was asking to practice in the Taj Mahal. But we were able to work out classroom usage from another coach I knew from way back (I was a walk-on coach, so no classroom myself), and broke up into two groups with my AC and myself doing hitting review work on laptops (we filmed some of your cage sessions), and I also went out, and bought a small mini projector....

      ....so we could do full team video, image viewing, or whatever else we wanted to talk about...various defensive plays, some offensive strategies, motivational clips, or whatever else we came up with at the time....that's sometimes easier in the classroom setting rather than out on the field.

      ​​Unfortunately, the one time we did try to "practice" on the blacktop, the AD put the kibosh on that with some "liability" nonsense...saying that we were only covered on "baseball approved facilities" whatever the heck that's supposed to be. =(

      But yes, just releasing kids due to unplayable fields is shirking one's coaching responsibilities, and not helping the team or the individual players one bit, and should be loathed by Skip or anyone else who expects more from their coaches than just babysitters when it's convenient for them.
      In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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      • #18
        I agree with some of the daddy ball comments. I have seen some examples of that as well. Unfortunately, I also see a lack of volunteers throughout youth sports. My daughter spent 6 years playing youth softball, basketball, and soccer. I coached all of them because I was told by each organization that they didn't have enough volunteers to coach the various teams. At one point I was also on the board for the local AYSO soccer league and the local softball league. We had over 150 kids in the soccer league while I was there and every single one of them was coached by a mom or a dad. The one exception was one aunt that stepped up to volunteer. Travel ball isn't much different. The closest organization I can name that doesn't have a coach with a family member on the team is over 50 miles away from our home. If it wasn't for moms and dads willing to coach, there would be a lot of young people that wouldn't have an opportunity to play youth sports.
        "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

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