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Why are wood bats rarely used by High School players?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by pattar View Post

    I have a hard time believing kids who are drafted would be getting jammed with 75mph BP fastballs consistently enough that they would break multiple bats in a BP session but I guess anything is possible..
    End of the bat does it often too. Especially with thinner handled bats. I could see them all over swinging trying to impress scouts and breaking bats left and right.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mattun View Post

      End of the bat does it often too. Especially with thinner handled bats. I could see them all over swinging trying to impress scouts and breaking bats left and right.
      True. Anyway, I loved hitting with wood. I wish I had only used wood.

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      • #18
        There are/were states who don’t allow wood bats due to the safety issue of flying broken bat pieces.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JoeG View Post
          2018 NFHS baseball rules book provides more flexibility on wood bats than non-wood bats, yet I can't remember the last time I've seen a wood bat used at a high school game here in CA. Specifically:

          If it's nonwood, it must be drop 3 BBCOR with max width of 2 5/8".

          If it's wood, it must be from a single piece of wood and no more than 2 3/4" width. Wood bats do not need the BBCOR mark.

          All bats must be 36" or less in length.

          I would think some players (especially small players) might prefer drop 5. Other players might want a 2 3/4" bat. I do get that bats are less durable, so many players will be happy to use a BBCOR bat that never breaks.

          Given the greater flexibility of wood bats, why are they so rarely used in High School?
          I don't want to lose the OP's question. I don't buy cost. There are dad's out there who have bought their kid $300-$500 bats, 5 of them, just to get a competitive edge. The question is, given that wood bats may have less restrictions, are there certain situations where a wood bat would be an advantage over a good BBCOR metal bat? If there was a wood bat that could give a kid 20% more HRs or add 0.5 onto their batting average, I'm sure there are a ton of dads that would line up to stock up. My guess is, that bat doesn't exist mainly because of the smaller sweet spot.
          Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by pthawaii View Post

            I don't want to lose the OP's question. I don't buy cost. There are dad's out there who have bought their kid $300-$500 bats, 5 of them, just to get a competitive edge. The question is, given that wood bats may have less restrictions, are there certain situations where a wood bat would be an advantage over a good BBCOR metal bat? If there was a wood bat that could give a kid 20% more HRs or add 0.5 onto their batting average, I'm sure there are a ton of dads that would line up to stock up. My guess is, that bat doesn't exist mainly because of the smaller sweet spot.
            There's also the other end. A small player being hit with high school bat requirements for the first time will be better able to control a drop 5 or drop 6 wood bat. My 13u son flips to 14u on August 1 and is not even remotely close to ready to swing a drop 3 bat, given his small size. Drop 5 wood bat . . . maybe.
            Last edited by JoeG; 06-08-2018, 01:26 PM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JoeG View Post

              There's also the other end. A small player being hit with high school bat requirements for the first time will be better able to control a drop 5 or drop 6 wood bat. My 13u son flips to 14u on August 1 and is not even remotely close to be ready to swing a drop 3 bat, given his small size. Drop 5 wood bat . . . maybe.
              Something to consider though is where the majority of the weight of the bat is. A -3 BBCOR might have a more balanced swing and feel lighter than a -5 end loaded wood bat that while actually lighter feels heavier.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by riot View Post

                Something to consider though is where the majority of the weight of the bat is. A -3 BBCOR might have a more balanced swing and feel lighter than a -5 end loaded wood bat that while actually lighter feels heavier.
                Understood. This is why I've been checking eBay daily to see if I can get a 30" Solo 617 at a good price at some point (hopefully soon!).

                He does actually have a drop 5, 2 1/4" bat which is about as easy for him to swing as his drop 8 USAbat. He uses it in batting practice a bit. However, it's not legal for use in BBCOR settings because only the barrel was made from a single piece of wood.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by LynkSpyder View Post
                  It is just too expensive. The bats break .
                  No offense intended, but expense is a phony issue because there are composite wood bats available that are very durable and cost-effective..

                  But players resist using them. I've been coaching woodbat during the summer and fall for quite a few years. I'm baffled why so few swing the cost effective composite wood bats.
                  Skip

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                  • #24
                    Nobody uses the composite wood mix because most of them are dead logs, only good for BP so can save your good Ash bats..... have purchased and tried rawlings and Easton for my son, and you can see how dead they are compared to an Ash or Maple.

                    Lately I picked up a used BBB bamboo for $10, and I am very impressed with the pop, might even pay sticker $$ for one . It even carries the BBCOR sticker.
                    I Still want to find a Demarini corndog. That bat looks intriguing :-)

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by skipper5 View Post

                      No offense intended, but expense is a phony issue because there are composite wood bats available that are very durable and cost-effective..

                      But players resist using them. I've been coaching woodbat during the summer and fall for quite a few years. I'm baffled why so few swing the cost effective composite wood bats.
                      I'm under the impression that composite wood bats are not legal for high school play. The rules are actually somewhat unclear on this. I have read the rules several times and they refer frequently to "A bat made of a single piece of wood."

                      However, if I'm interpreting the rules correction, it seems as though they left open the possibility of making a wood bat that is not made of a single piece of wood - but then it must be subject to the BBCOR testing protocols and restrictions such as 2 5/8" maximum width and drop 3.

                      Given the initial thrust of this post, though (can there be some benefit to a wood bat with drop of more than 3 or diameter of more than 2 5/8" ?), for the purposes of discussion I think it's worth just concentrating on bats made of a single piece of wood, which would preclude composite wood bats.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Coach T13 View Post
                        Nobody uses the composite wood mix because most of them are dead logs, only good for BP so can save your good Ash bats..... have purchased and tried rawlings and Easton for my son, and you can see how dead they are compared to an Ash or Maple.

                        Lately I picked up a used BBB bamboo for $10, and I am very impressed with the pop, might even pay sticker $$ for one . It even carries the BBCOR sticker.
                        I Still want to find a Demarini corndog. That bat looks intriguing :-)
                        That Baum Bat is freakin' awesome... If they could get the barrel swingweight right, it would be perfect... They just swing a little bit light, but when you square it up it feels just like a good wood bat... They're perfect for most HS players though...
                        I don't like my balls to smell like pickles.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by JoeG View Post

                          He does actually have a drop 5, 2 1/4" bat which is about as easy for him to swing as his drop 8 USAbat. He uses it in batting practice a bit. However, it's not legal for use in BBCOR settings because only the barrel was made from a single piece of wood.
                          It's not legal because it's not a drop -3... BBCOR standard is only for -3 bats...

                          I don't like my balls to smell like pickles.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Bolts-Baseball View Post

                            It's not legal because it's not a drop -3... BBCOR standard is only for -3 bats...
                            If you read the rules carefully, it says that bats that are not made from a single piece of wood must be BBCOR and drop 3. In other words, if it is made from a single piece of Wood, it does not have to be BBCOR or drop 3 (however, it does say they must not exceed 2 3/4" thickness if made from a single piece of wood). It's possible that some states have rules that elaborate further, but I looked up California rules and there was nothing in CA that made the national rules any different with regard to wood.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by pthawaii View Post

                              I don't want to lose the OP's question. I don't buy cost. There are dad's out there who have bought their kid $300-$500 bats, 5 of them, just to get a competitive edge. The question is, given that wood bats may have less restrictions, are there certain situations where a wood bat would be an advantage over a good BBCOR metal bat? If there was a wood bat that could give a kid 20% more HRs or add 0.5 onto their batting average, I'm sure there are a ton of dads that would line up to stock up. My guess is, that bat doesn't exist mainly because of the smaller sweet spot.
                              But the OP was talking about high school, not travel ball. Schools still have to provide some gear; especially the smaller schools that already have no budget.

                              On a related note, we've done several wood bat tournaments over the years. I've never seen one that didn't include a handful of broken bats. But I've only seen 1 or 2 aluminum bats broken in that time. And all of those had a very long life.

                              But this little trip down memory lane reminded me of a fun (not at the time) memory from 4 years ago; his 3rd broken bat. Marucci decided to replace this one because of the way it broke. They didn't have to. We didn't buy the insurance. Good customer service.
                              Josh Greer
                              LynkSpyder - Chain Link Fence Camera Mount
                              (Links aren't allowed....Google us.)

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by pattar View Post

                                In BP? That is hard to believe. Who was throwing BP, Nolan Ryan? I didn't use a wood bat till the summer before college and while it did take some getting use to, I think I might have broken only a few bats in the 3 years I used them (and never any in BP and I wasn't half the hitter most those guys would have been..) MiLB games I can see, but BP?
                                Maybe the bp thrower was told to throw hard stuff in from 40 feet to make a point to the hitter.
                                I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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