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Why are wood bats rarely used by High School players?

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  • #46
    For the player breaking a lot of bats - try the 110 turn. Usually around a 1" handle and under 2.5 barrel making it well balanced.
    "Whata crowd, whata crowd! I tell ya, I'm all right now but last week I was in rough shape..."

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    • #47
      Boombah has wood bats that are bamboo/maple composite. The drop 3 are BBCOR certified. My son also has a Marucci maple bat (I believe the CU26) and he prefers the Boombah. He says it feels like the Boombah has more pop.

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      • #48
        Not sure if it's true of baseball, but the lighter wood softball bats didn't generate nearly the distance that the heavy ones did regardless of wood (bamboo, ash, maple, birch). Length was even more important than weight. The most feared bat we had was a 36" 36oz Maple A-Bat. That beast was too heavy for me, but the most success I had personally was was a 35/33 Maple and a 35/28 Bamboo (wish they made those in 30 oz). I thought importance went Length > Weight > End Loaded > Bamboo > Maple > Birch > Ash

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        • #49
          Originally posted by omg View Post
          Composite wood bats, as skip pointed out, rarely if ever break. They cost between 50-150, are made of maple generally and, I believe, are legal or were legal in rookie and short season A ball. Demarini and Brett are two of my favorites but there are other good ones out there. If high school or college adopted them the price would come down.

          BBCOR is good though I would prefer wood. Even with wood I'm sure folks would figure out how to juice them.
          Very hard to do. The juicing of the composite bats comes largely from enhancing the trampoline effect. I dunno how you'd get that with a wood surface. It's been tried throughout baseball history but I'm not aware of any evidence that a corked bat works better.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Tman View Post

            Very hard to do. The juicing of the composite bats comes largely from enhancing the trampoline effect. I dunno how you'd get that with a wood surface. It's been tried throughout baseball history but I'm not aware of any evidence that a corked bat works better.
            Yeah I know. Making wood bats -5, -7 etc. and using bamboo is a little sketchy when every one in a league/tourney might not know about these things. Can always juice the balls though, i.e., some balls definitely go farther than others. Might come a time where the umpire (or league) shows up at the game with designated bats, say, a 32, 33, 34 and both teams have to use them.

            Domingo says the hardness of his wood bats can be increased by crushing up and rubbing on some Tadalafil. And don't forget Norm Cash:

            "Still, his .361 average would be the highest by any major league player in the 1960s. The Tigers finished 101–61 for their best regular season record since 1934, and scored the most runs in baseball, though they finished second in the AL, eight games behind the New York Yankees; Cash was fourth in the MVP voting. In addition, Cash later admitted to using an illegal corked bat during the 1961 season, demonstrating how he had drilled a hole in his bats and filled it with a mixture of sawdust, cork and glue. His 1961 statistics turned out to be career highs which he rarely approached again – in later years, he never reached 100 runs or 100 RBI, and never batted above .283. His 118-point drop to a .243 average in 1962 was the largest ever by a batting champion."
            Major Figure

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