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Why are wood bats rarely used by High School players?

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  • JoeG
    started a topic Why are wood bats rarely used by High School players?

    Why are wood bats rarely used by High School players?

    2018 NFHS baseball rules book provides more flexibility on wood bats than non-wood bats, yet I can't remember the last time I've seen a wood bat used at a high school game here in CA. Specifically:

    If it's nonwood, it must be drop 3 BBCOR with max width of 2 5/8".

    If it's wood, it must be from a single piece of wood and no more than 2 3/4" width. Wood bats do not need the BBCOR mark.

    All bats must be 36" or less in length.

    I would think some players (especially small players) might prefer drop 5. Other players might want a 2 3/4" bat. I do get that bats are less durable, so many players will be happy to use a BBCOR bat that never breaks.

    Given the greater flexibility of wood bats, why are they so rarely used in High School?

  • omg
    replied
    Originally posted by Tman View Post

    Very hard to do. The juicing of the composite bats comes largely from enhancing the trampoline effect. I dunno how you'd get that with a wood surface. It's been tried throughout baseball history but I'm not aware of any evidence that a corked bat works better.
    Yeah I know. Making wood bats -5, -7 etc. and using bamboo is a little sketchy when every one in a league/tourney might not know about these things. Can always juice the balls though, i.e., some balls definitely go farther than others. Might come a time where the umpire (or league) shows up at the game with designated bats, say, a 32, 33, 34 and both teams have to use them.

    Domingo says the hardness of his wood bats can be increased by crushing up and rubbing on some Tadalafil. And don't forget Norm Cash:

    "Still, his .361 average would be the highest by any major league player in the 1960s. The Tigers finished 101–61 for their best regular season record since 1934, and scored the most runs in baseball, though they finished second in the AL, eight games behind the New York Yankees; Cash was fourth in the MVP voting. In addition, Cash later admitted to using an illegal corked bat during the 1961 season, demonstrating how he had drilled a hole in his bats and filled it with a mixture of sawdust, cork and glue. His 1961 statistics turned out to be career highs which he rarely approached again – in later years, he never reached 100 runs or 100 RBI, and never batted above .283. His 118-point drop to a .243 average in 1962 was the largest ever by a batting champion."

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  • Tman
    replied
    Originally posted by omg View Post
    Composite wood bats, as skip pointed out, rarely if ever break. They cost between 50-150, are made of maple generally and, I believe, are legal or were legal in rookie and short season A ball. Demarini and Brett are two of my favorites but there are other good ones out there. If high school or college adopted them the price would come down.

    BBCOR is good though I would prefer wood. Even with wood I'm sure folks would figure out how to juice them.
    Very hard to do. The juicing of the composite bats comes largely from enhancing the trampoline effect. I dunno how you'd get that with a wood surface. It's been tried throughout baseball history but I'm not aware of any evidence that a corked bat works better.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattun
    replied
    Not sure if it's true of baseball, but the lighter wood softball bats didn't generate nearly the distance that the heavy ones did regardless of wood (bamboo, ash, maple, birch). Length was even more important than weight. The most feared bat we had was a 36" 36oz Maple A-Bat. That beast was too heavy for me, but the most success I had personally was was a 35/33 Maple and a 35/28 Bamboo (wish they made those in 30 oz). I thought importance went Length > Weight > End Loaded > Bamboo > Maple > Birch > Ash

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  • Colonel21
    replied
    Boombah has wood bats that are bamboo/maple composite. The drop 3 are BBCOR certified. My son also has a Marucci maple bat (I believe the CU26) and he prefers the Boombah. He says it feels like the Boombah has more pop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wally Gator
    replied
    For the player breaking a lot of bats - try the 110 turn. Usually around a 1" handle and under 2.5 barrel making it well balanced.

    Leave a comment:


  • skipper5
    replied
    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

    Many tournaments do not allow bamboo since it is not wood. Bamboo is grass. But it’s compressed to a level that is denser than wood.
    A baseball is a conprressed ball of yarn. It doesn't notice differences in surface hardness of a bat.

    How do I know that? Because I'm declaring it to be true.

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  • omg
    replied
    Composite wood bats, as skip pointed out, rarely if ever break. They cost between 50-150, are made of maple generally and, I believe, are legal or were legal in rookie and short season A ball. Demarini and Brett are two of my favorites but there are other good ones out there. If high school or college adopted them the price would come down.

    BBCOR is good though I would prefer wood. Even with wood I'm sure folks would figure out how to juice them.

    Leave a comment:


  • JettSixty
    replied
    My son broke two bats per summer in 40-50 games. I had kids who were breaking a bat every weekend. I bought him LS C243’s. They were very close in shape, grip and balance to his ExoGrid.

    Leave a comment:


  • JettSixty
    replied
    Originally posted by sparkny2 View Post

    They should allow bamboo
    Many tournaments do not allow bamboo since it is not wood. Bamboo is grass. But it’s compressed to a level that is denser than wood.

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeG
    replied
    Originally posted by sparkny2 View Post

    I was able to get a 30/27 5150 for about $75 during the off season (late fall) after my kid completed 11U. He used it as a overload trainer during the winter and used it for summer 12U when he guest played on a 13U team. Phoenix bats sells drop 8 wood that is balanced. They have sales during the major holidays, with our holiday coming up there should be a deal. Beaver bats a local company near me makes pretty good wood bats they supply to the local MiLB team. As a disclaimer, my 13u kid claims his beaver bat is dead, but I suspect he is trying convince me to buy him a $150 Marucci, but my wallet and more importantly my wife says NO!
    The K240 drop 7 seems pretty interesting at Phoenix bats. Do you have experience with it (or have seen someone else use it)?

    Leave a comment:


  • Tman
    replied
    Originally posted by The Flush View Post
    We played our first 14U wood bat tourney a couple weeks ago and only broke one bat. We did however create a minor controversy when we questioned an opponents use of a bamboo bat which made them forfeit the game (that we were leading 1-0 in the top of the 6th with 2 outs when their cleanup hitter got a hit to put runners on 1st and 2nd). Email from the TD clearly said no bamboo bats, but apparently our coach was the only one to read it because the 2 teams playing after us were scrambling to find enough wood bats for their game. Some coaches tried to argue that bamboo is wood, but it is not. It is a grass and a bamboo bat is a composite bat. We ended up beating the same team in bracket play the next day anyway, but only after their coach accused us of cheating for calling them out for cheating.
    Indeed, bamboo bats are composites. However, it's something that the wood bat leagues should maybe consider allowing one day to reduce expenses as they tend to not break as easily and I believe generally meet the same performance standards.

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  • Tman
    replied
    Cost more due to breakage. Less customizable. Smaller sweet spot.

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  • skipper5
    replied
    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
    There are/were states who don’t allow wood bats due to the safety issue of flying broken bat pieces.
    Rationally, those states should ban maple, and allow ash, which seldom separate into pieces when they break.

    I've coached over 400 woodbat games and can't remember an ash bat that separated when it broke.

    OTOH, I have CRS.
    Last edited by skipper5; 06-09-2018, 06:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • skipper5
    replied
    FWIW, last summer my 18u team broke 20 bats in 30 games.
    5 batters broke none.
    3 batters broke one.
    3 batters broke two.
    1 batter broke three
    2 batters broke four.

    Leave a comment:

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