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  • Viking0
    replied
    I do know that the type of college coach makes a big difference in balancing academics and baseball. One coach told a player pursuing Engineering degrees to change his major to something easier, and after his baseball eligibility is over to come back and get the Engineering degree (he quit baseball soon after). Our current coach will give players an easier schedule when finals week approaches to study. The latter coach has been more successful on the field so far than the former.

    In the end, if my kid ever ends up playing College baseball (real big if), I hope he will put academics first. There are too many guys who I have seen come out of our local University with little to show for it. One guy I know left early to go to the draft. After one year, he is relegated to the bench as the players the teams invested real money in are getting the reps (even though their numbers aren't as good). This is according to him, btw, but professional baseball is a whole other animal and thread. Another former college player finally got a shot in an independent. He lasted a month, and is back giving hitting lessons. Another guy was working towards being a coach, having been offered a graduate assistant position. The coach who offered it to him got fired, and he was out of luck. Now, he works sales for a local company.... Basically, baseball will run out, and I think it is important to remember to have a balanced approach to not just baseball, but life.



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  • JettSixty
    replied
    Good info on the videos. Parents can do anything in the background. But the player has to be the face of recruiting process to the college coach. Regarding statistics, great high school or travel stats are nothing more than a brochure. The player has to display tools that translate at the level of play of the college.

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  • WailukuHeights
    replied
    https://youtu.be/PHDxMVcxZCQ

    https://youtu.be/VbCA6_1QkSI

    Leave a comment:


  • pattar
    replied
    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
    If you’re kid wants to play college ball does he know what he’s getting into? The following is a sample fall schedule both kids (baseball and softball) had Monday to Friday.

    6am Swim for upper body strength
    7am Get ready for class and eat.
    8-12 class
    12pm eat
    1-4pm practice
    5pm eat
    7pm weight lifting or agility training
    9pm until done homework

    Notice the math doesn’t work real well for eight hours of sleep.

    Saturdays were morning practice from 9-12. Being at large universities they were encouraged to go to football games and support the team. Saturday afternoon and evening was the only social time

    Sundays were sleep late, watch football and catch up on homework.

    My kids saw the spring season as a break from the grind of the fall. But picture ten hour bus rides on Sunday night back to campus after an away series end at 3 or 4pm and classes on Monday morning at 8am. My son’s coach required signatures from professors to prove they showed. How about four hour round trip to play one game on a weekday/school day?

    According to kids I know at D3’s their schedules weren’t too much different. At top academics they got a little slack for missing practices due to academics. But they said it did hurt players who missed practices.

    Also, you may have heard the NCAA has placed hour limits on team activities. All the swimming, weight training and agility training is optional. But you sign into the training area or pool. Try skipping these and see what happens.
    I played D3 20+ years ago and was an Engineering major. It was in the Northeast so we had 6 am practices indoors in the early spring. I was studying to at least midnight every night I ended up getting mononucleosis partly, or maybe mainly, because I wasn't getting any sleep. Even though I was starting until I got sick, I eventually just couldn't take it anymore, it wasn't fun, and decided I had to make a decision and academics won out. It can be done obviously, but a kid has to know that they cannot go 110% at everything.

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  • JettSixty
    replied
    Originally posted by new2thesport View Post

    Excellent post! Also can you elaborate on school breaks that sometimes they are out playing in a system or farm league? I dont know what it is called. But they continue to play.
    My kids reported for practice the first Monday after New Years regardless of vacation schedule. The season starts mid February. Spring break just means you can play every day without missing classes. My son had an away weekend series the day of his graduation. He missed his graduation. It’s baseball first. The only reason coaches care about grades is remaining eligible.

    During the season they missed classes every other weekend with away series. With my son’s school’s February weather situation they missed three consecutive Friday’s classes flying out the first three weeks of the season. Anything ten hours or under is on a bus.

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  • new2thesport
    replied
    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
    If you’re kid wants to play college ball does he know what he’s getting into? The following is a sample fall schedule both kids (baseball and softball) had Monday to Friday.

    6am Swim for upper body strength
    7am Get ready for class and eat.
    8-12 class
    12pm eat
    1-4pm practice
    5pm eat
    7pm weight lifting or agility training
    9pm until done homework

    Notice the math doesn’t work real well for eight hours of sleep.

    Saturdays were morning practice from 9-12. Being at large universities they were encouraged to go to football games and support the team. Saturday afternoon and evening was the only social time

    Sundays were sleep late, watch football and catch up on homework.

    My kids saw the spring season as a break from the grind of the fall. But picture ten hour bus rides on Sunday night back to campus after an away series end at 3 or 4pm and classes on Monday morning at 8am. My son’s coach required signatures from professors to prove they showed. How about four hour round trip to play one game on a weekday/school day?

    According to kids I know at D3’s their schedules weren’t too much different. At top academics they got a little slack for missing practices due to academics. But they said it did hurt players who missed practices.

    Also, you may have heard the NCAA has placed hour limits on team activities. All the swimming, weight training and agility training is optional. But you sign into the training area or pool. Try skipping these and see what happens.
    Excellent post! Also can you elaborate on school breaks that sometimes they are out playing in a system or farm league? I dont know what it is called. But they continue to play.

    Leave a comment:


  • JettSixty
    replied
    If you’re kid wants to play college ball does he know what he’s getting into? The following is a sample fall schedule both kids (baseball and softball) had Monday to Friday.

    6am Swim for upper body strength
    7am Get ready for class and eat.
    8-12 class
    12pm eat
    1-4pm practice
    5pm eat
    7pm weight lifting or agility training
    9pm until done homework

    Notice the math doesn’t work real well for eight hours of sleep.

    Saturdays were morning practice from 9-12. Being at large universities they were encouraged to go to football games and support the team. Saturday afternoon and evening was the only social time

    Sundays were sleep late, watch football and catch up on homework.

    My kids saw the spring season as a break from the grind of the fall. But picture ten hour bus rides on Sunday night back to campus after an away series end at 3 or 4pm and classes on Monday morning at 8am. My son’s coach required signatures from professors to prove they showed. How about four hour round trip to play one game on a weekday/school day?

    According to kids I know at D3’s their schedules weren’t too much different. At top academics they got a little slack for missing practices due to academics. But they said it did hurt players who missed practices.

    Also, you may have heard the NCAA has placed hour limits on team activities. All the swimming, weight training and agility training is optional. But you sign into the training area or pool. Try skipping these and see what happens.

    Leave a comment:


  • JettSixty
    replied
    Originally posted by Viking0 View Post

    I am curious of what caused the four to stand out? What was it about their swings? Was it that they just barrelled up the ball more consistently? Did they hit the ball farther? Was it simple batting practice you watched or against live pitching (with curve balls and all)?
    it was with a coach zipping the ball from behind a screen at forty feet. Four players were quicker to react, had fast swings, made consistent contact and consistently repeated their mechanics. I didn’t stay for the scrimmage.

    Leave a comment:


  • Viking0
    replied
    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

    There were. 26 position players. I watched them all hit. I knew one of the college players. I walked over and chatted with him. I told him I only saw four D1 swings. He told me that’s what his group of pitchers (team players sitting on the side) said. Then he told me the four players I picked were not locals. They were all found at PG in the summer and invited to the showcase. Everyone else was funding their spring trip.
    I am curious of what caused the four to stand out? What was it about their swings? Was it that they just barrelled up the ball more consistently? Did they hit the ball farther? Was it simple batting practice you watched or against live pitching (with curve balls and all)?

    Leave a comment:


  • new2thesport
    replied
    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

    There were. 26 position players. I watched them all hit. I knew one of the college players. I walked over and chatted with him. I told him I only saw four D1 swings. He told me that’s what his group of pitchers (team players sitting on the side) said. Then he told me the four players I picked were not locals. They were all found at PG in the summer and invited to the showcase. Everyone else was funding their spring trip.
    This is the honest truth and thank you for pointing it out.


    Leave a comment:


  • AdamInNY
    replied
    Going through this process now with my oldest (2020). Been fortunate for my son to have a coach with a lot college contacts. Local college showcase/tournaments have been the way to go. Usually there will be several schools at a college's showcase (though they seem not to invite other schools in their conference ;-)). As we get to the end of the summer, we are narrowing down schools. My son will attend their prospect camps in the the late summer/fall.

    In regards to PG, both my son's have played in a bunch of tournaments and haven't done their showcases. For a pitcher, it's nice to have a verified number up. We're in the Northeast, and my oldest does not have SEC/ACC potential so we go down to GA/FL knowing he's not doing that for the exposure.

    My youngest (2022) did a Prep Baseball Report showcase at 13. That actually proved helpful in getting him on some of our local school's radar.

    Also helps to be on a team where the majority of the team has interest from schools. There have been a few occasions where schools have come down to watch our other players, when my son was pitching.
    Last edited by AdamInNY; 07-19-2018, 12:34 PM.

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  • JettSixty
    replied
    One Saturday in the fall I drove by the local D1 (a P6, Big East used to be a P before imploding) and noticed they were conducting a showcase. Their fall showcases are for serious players. They do 36 player showcases for three weekends. Every kid who goes believes they can play there.

    All the infielders looked slick. They all fired the ball accurately to first. All the outfielders looked slick. They all made accurate throws to third. Everyone who ran a sub seven sixty must have been feeling great about themselves so far.

    There were. 26 position players. I watched them all hit. I knew one of the college players. I walked over and chatted with him. I told him I only saw four D1 swings. He told me that’s what his group of pitchers (team players sitting on the side) said. Then he told me the four players I picked were not locals. They were all found at PG in the summer and invited to the showcase. Everyone else was funding their spring trip.

    Leave a comment:


  • JettSixty
    replied
    Originally posted by johnlanza View Post
    Good stuff as usual, Jett.
    What are your thoughts of 14u's going to showcases or something similar to get a feel for what to expect when they go again at 15, 16 or 17? (and also give them a sense of what they really need to work on to become a better player)?
    Even if it’s an inexpensive, local showcase I believe the player has to have something to show. Otherwise he will feel out of place. To line this up I have to delve into another personal perspective. I believe kids should play travel grade appropriate starting with seventh grade. Therefore, my son was playing 14u as a late blooming 5’4” 120 13u eligible. He was also growing rapidly that summer. While he played well the rapid growth spurt played he’ll with his mechanics.

    The following year he played 16u at 5’11” 135. While he was quite lanky he now belonged on a low level showcase field. He did a showcase at a local D1 to learn the process. It was only $150.That summer the team played in a 16u D2 showcase/tournament. On Friday it was a showcase. Over the next two days it was a tournament. So everyone on the team got at least one experience.

    If a kid wants to learn what it takes to be a college player attend games.

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  • sparkny2
    replied
    My local D1 offers a one day minicamp for $165 but does not offer any measurables (at least not last year). The UA Baseball Factory national tryouts offers measurables for under a C-note. The local USA Baseball NTIS tryout took measurables that was $150. All 3 had typical showcase drills and evals.

    Leave a comment:


  • chief2791
    replied
    Originally posted by johnlanza View Post
    Good stuff as usual, Jett.
    What are your thoughts of 14u's going to showcases or something similar to get a feel for what to expect when they go again at 15, 16 or 17? (and also give them a sense of what they really need to work on to become a better player)?
    Not Jett, but I think it's a good idea to go to a local inexpensive showcase to get your feet wet. I believe it's throwing money away 99% of the time to do a PG showcase at that age. I don't know what other states have in terms of local showcases, but ours has a really good and inexpensive one that is well attended by coaches in SC, all levels. Mine did this one 4-5 times starting when he was a Fresh. Did we expect to get interest or offers initially? Absolutely not. We wanted to 1) get the nerves out early, and 2) establish a baseline on measurables that could show improvement in the future.

    Leave a comment:

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