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  • JettSixty
    replied
    Originally posted by rodk View Post

    These are interesting results but the OP was addressing the high school girls' softball team that he coaches. He insisted his outfielders could reach home from the warning track.
    It’s 200 feet from the wall to the plate. An outfielder with a good arm should be able to hit the the cutoff man right in the nose which would make the plate on one hop.

    Leave a comment:


  • rodk
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeG View Post

    For those interested in the math and science, the following science supports an average-sized 14 year old throwing just shy 200 feet:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4060312/

    And if you want to do distance calculations with a spreadsheet for bats:

    http://baseball.physics.illinois.edu...lator-new.html

    My own son, who is much smaller than average for a 14-year old baseball player at 5' 3", 104 pounds, currently throws around 180 to 190 feet.
    These are interesting results but the OP was addressing the high school girls' softball team that he coaches. He insisted his outfielders could reach home from the warning track.

    Leave a comment:


  • mys
    replied
    Originally posted by Colonel21 View Post

    That actually seems kind of low to me. I would think that would align more with a freshman and then see sophomore year up to around 87/88.
    I took it to mean that all players, regardless of position, threw 85 as sophs. pitchers would probably be higher, imo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Colonel21
    replied
    Originally posted by mys View Post

    also, I saw something (not sure where) saying that the average Pac10 recruit's raw throwing velo in their HS sophomore year is 85 mph. Is this accurate? does this metric hold for other top D1s?
    That actually seems kind of low to me. I would think that would align more with a freshman and then see sophomore year up to around 87/88.

    Leave a comment:


  • mys
    replied
    What, if any, strategies would come in to play now that the 2020 school season (at least) is gone? not that school ball seems to be very influential, but it leads into summer and fall opportunities, at times. also, summer ball and showcases are a question mark now, and, when they do come back, they'll be jammed up, I think, with everyone and his brother trying to be seen to make up for lost time.
    my 2023 isn't in too much of a pickle because of all of this but I can see where it could affect the recruiting timeline for 2021s and some 2022's (not to mention uncommitted 2020's making a last push for a roster spot next year).

    also, I saw something (not sure where) saying that the average Pac10 recruit's raw throwing velo in their HS sophomore year is 85 mph. Is this accurate? does this metric hold for other top D1s?

    Leave a comment:


  • songtitle
    replied
    How to get recruited by a college baseball program

    All you have to do is get Aunt Becky to cough up some cash

    aunt_becky_memes_college_cheating_scandal_lori_loughlin.jpg?quality=90&w=650.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • JoeG
    replied
    Originally posted by rodk View Post

    Interesting, but hard to have a conversation with someone who thinks math and science are fake.

    So let's deal with it just on coaching. A major league outfielder stands about 280 feet from home in an "outfield in" situation because that represents the max distance he can throw it while having a reasonable chance to get a runner who is tagging out. https://www.active.com/baseball/arti...de-easy?page=1 That amazing throw from Cespides in 2014 that drew gasps of "unbelievable" and "are you kidding me" was about 300 feet.

    Are you really telling us that your 9th grade outfielder who weighs 100 lbs can throw a ball that is 20% heavier, slipperier, and harder to grip 200 feet in the air all the way home, when that is a challenge for big leaguers? Or even 150 feet?
    For those interested in the math and science, the following science supports an average-sized 14 year old throwing just shy 200 feet:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4060312/

    And if you want to do distance calculations with a spreadsheet for bats:

    http://baseball.physics.illinois.edu...lator-new.html

    My own son, who is much smaller than average for a 14-year old baseball player at 5' 3", 104 pounds, currently throws around 180 to 190 feet.

    Leave a comment:


  • pthawaii
    replied
    Found this link in a different thread on this site, wanted to add it to this thread:


    https://keepplayingbaseball.org/

    Leave a comment:


  • AdamInNY
    replied
    Originally posted by SomeBaseballDad View Post
    Play the game at a higher level than those around you, and get decent grades, and not be, nor should your parents be headcases. That's pretty much it.
    Depends on your idea of decent grades...

    NCAA rules for D1s state a student athlete needs a 3.5 GPA or 1270 on the SATs for the school to combine academic with athletic money.

    Leave a comment:


  • SomeBaseballDad
    replied
    Play the game at a higher level than those around you, and get decent grades, and not be, nor should your parents be headcases. That's pretty much it.

    Leave a comment:


  • mudvnine
    replied
    e
    Originally posted by rodk View Post
    Are you really telling us that your 9th grade outfielder who weighs 100 lbs can throw a ball that is 20% heavier, slipperier, and harder to grip 200 feet in the air all the way home, when that is a challenge for big leaguers? Or even 150 feet?
    Rod, go back and look at that entire play again....I think you'll see that the bold above is what happened to that throw, and yes, IMO a "9th grade" and older OFer should be able to throw the ball 100-125', and right where F3 had positioned herself for the throw had it not slipped out of F9's hand initially. As far as F4 and F6 are concerned, they seemed to be aligned in "double cut" or "double relay" positioning for a throw that might have gone to 3rd base instead.

    Although granted, I'm not sure on the size of a softball field that a "double cut" would ever be necessary at the HS level or above...but I could also interpret F6's movements as simply moving towards, and wandering off from covering 2nd as would have been her assignment if the ball did go to the F4 cut towards 3rd (who might also be a bit to close to F9, but whatever), and a "back pick" if you will...if the runner rounded 2nd too far then deciding that she would never make it to 3rd as the ball was coming in.

    So all in all I think you're trying to make an argument on a mis-thrown ball, unless you want to say that the cut off guys in the clip below were all in the wrong spot(s) or stationary....
    delmon.gif
    ....because none of them were in any position to make play that "strong" throw.
    Last edited by mudvnine; 12-19-2018, 12:06 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cannonball
    replied
    Deleted. I crossed the line!

    Leave a comment:


  • rodk
    replied
    Originally posted by Cannonball View Post

    The 2B was in exactly the right position.... Do all the math you want but your "fact" doesn't represent much at all... Every one of my high school outfielders can throw a ball to home from their OF positions.
    Interesting, but hard to have a conversation with someone who thinks math and science are fake.

    So let's deal with it just on coaching. A major league outfielder stands about 280 feet from home in an "outfield in" situation because that represents the max distance he can throw it while having a reasonable chance to get a runner who is tagging out. https://www.active.com/baseball/arti...de-easy?page=1 That amazing throw from Cespides in 2014 that drew gasps of "unbelievable" and "are you kidding me" was about 300 feet.

    Are you really telling us that your 9th grade outfielder who weighs 100 lbs can throw a ball that is 20% heavier, slipperier, and harder to grip 200 feet in the air all the way home, when that is a challenge for big leaguers? Or even 150 feet?

    Leave a comment:


  • FP26
    replied
    Originally posted by pthawaii View Post
    I was at a family gathering this weekend and was sitting at a table where one of my nephews, who played at the same HS my son attends, now coaches at a D3. A few things he mentioned regarding his school, GPA would need to be 3.65 or higher (he is aware of my sons school having graduated from there so I trust that's an accurate figure for that school), and as for camps, he said if you are going to attend a camp, try to attend camps with multiple schools present. Those are better than the single school camps where school players are running the camp (aka fund raiser for school).
    I agree with this but there are always exceptions. DD initially started with approximately 10 schools that she considered true possibilities. They had her major. She liked the school/area. And she was confident she would get accepted.

    1) The school that ended up being #2 on her list ran 2 private camps per year. One was open to anyone from 7th to 12th grade (fund raiser). The other was strictly for 10th through 12th grade. At the last one she attended they had several hitting stations set up. One of them included live pitching with a pitcher and catcher from the varsity team (in a cage). DD went into that cage and struggled on the first few swings. But then started hitting line drive after line drive. The assistant coach was watching, then asked the head coach to come over. At the end of the clinic, they asked her to stick around and offered her a spot on the team.
    2) The school that ended up being #1 and that she is currently enrolled, didn't have any private camps. Every camp their head coach attends is attended by several other colleges. Some small (3 or 4 schools) and some large (20+ schools). All throughout the fall DD spent a great deal of her time in the coaches office and has learned that the coach not only likes the one-on-one interaction that such an atmosphere provides, but she also likes to see how her prospects deal with other coaches and ideas as well. If she is watching a specific player, she is watching the entire time, whether the player knows it or not.

    Ultimately the best piece of advice DD ever received came from her pitching coach (former D1 and D2 coach). He told her that college recruiting is not a "selection" process, but an "elimination" process. Unless you are ridiculously good, the number of players most colleges have to select from is crazy. Don't do anything that will get you removed from their list.

    Leave a comment:


  • pthawaii
    replied
    I was at a family gathering this weekend and was sitting at a table where one of my nephews, who played at the same HS my son attends, now coaches at a D3. A few things he mentioned regarding his school, GPA would need to be 3.65 or higher (he is aware of my sons school having graduated from there so I trust that's an accurate figure for that school), and as for camps, he said if you are going to attend a camp, try to attend camps with multiple schools present. Those are better than the single school camps where school players are running the camp (aka fund raiser for school).

    Leave a comment:

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