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Velo vs Solo BBCOR

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  • Velo vs Solo BBCOR

    If anyone has experience with either of the 2 bats, I'd like to know how they differ, or are they pretty similar?

    I know they are both popular low MOI,well balanced bats. Are either of these known to weigh a lot more than the sticker weight? I'm looking for the lightest swinging alloy BBCOR for a smaller kid moving up to a 31".

  • #2
    Very similar bats. The Solo has a slightly thinner handle, IMHO.

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    • #3
      Here's a good information source-

      https://www.justbatreviews.com/bbcor-bat-reviews/
      Put your junk in your pocket!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Cooper21 View Post
        If anyone has experience with either of the 2 bats, I'd like to know how they differ, or are they pretty similar?

        I know they are both popular low MOI,well balanced bats. Are either of these known to weigh a lot more than the sticker weight? I'm looking for the lightest swinging alloy BBCOR for a smaller kid moving up to a 31".
        How big is your kid? If he's really small, consider a 30" Solo (Velo not made in less than 31"). My 13u son is 5' 0" and 93 pounds. He can swing the 30" solo just fine in BP, but he isn't yet performing well in games with it, due to poor bat control.

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        • #5
          He is close to 5'4" and 94lbs. He has a 30/27 Easton Beast X Speed that he used in the Spring. It is very balanced but it is really more like a 30/29 and it feels a bit heavy. If he connects it really goes, but as you said, bat control is more important. I'm not sure if it's worth getting a a 2nd 30"(Solo) as he is growing taller, faster now. If only I could find a used one for under $50. I thought he could start swinging a 31/28 for Fall Ball, to train in winter, and the Spring season. I see Velos for good prices right now, new and used.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cooper21 View Post
            He is close to 5'4" and 94lbs. He has a 30/27 Easton Beast X Speed that he used in the Spring. It is very balanced but it is really more like a 30/29 and it feels a bit heavy. If he connects it really goes, but as you said, bat control is more important. I'm not sure if it's worth getting a a 2nd 30"(Solo) as he is growing taller, faster now. If only I could find a used one for under $50. I thought he could start swinging a 31/28 for Fall Ball, to train in winter, and the Spring season. I see Velos for good prices right now, new and used.
            94 pounds is very light for 5' 4", but nevertheless at that height your son is borderline almost ready for 31" BBCOR. My son is 93-94 lbs and only 5' 0" and there is no way he is ready for 31". Not even close.

            S1, Velo, and Solo are all light swinging bats and all good if you're going to push to 31". However, more than the bat, what matters more at this point is your kid putting on weight by working out. By working out, calisthenics such as pullups, pushups, and planks could be sufficient.

            I wrote a long article on physical conditioning for young kids that might prove helpful:

            https://www.filterjoe.com/2017/08/30...etes-baseball/
            Last edited by JoeG; 08-08-2018, 06:25 AM.

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            • #7
              Yes, he's a thin kid... genetics. He eats pretty well, doesn't gain weight, but he's healthy. Not great for baseball but he'll never have to worry about his weight. He broke his wrist at the beginning of summer so he couldn't swim. When he trains and competes in swimming, he is super strong for his size. So he is just starting to workout now for baseball.

              I agree he's borderline for 31". 30" will probably be better for Fall Ball, and hopefully 31' for Spring.

              I will read your website for conditioning Joe. Do you know any effective weight gaining tricks? We've tried the protein drinks to no avail. Working out seems to make him even more lean with very little body fat.

              Comment


              • #8
                I wouldn't worry about a Speed/Velo/Solo for fall- they are just too close for much meaningful difference, especially for training. Just go with whatever he has now. Also, alternate swinging a wood bat and a -8 or -10 off the tee for overload/underload training, and he will be fine by next spring.
                Put your junk in your pocket!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Cooper21 View Post
                  Yes, he's a thin kid... genetics. He eats pretty well, doesn't gain weight, but he's healthy. Not great for baseball but he'll never have to worry about his weight. He broke his wrist at the beginning of summer so he couldn't swim. When he trains and competes in swimming, he is super strong for his size. So he is just starting to workout now for baseball.

                  I agree he's borderline for 31". 30" will probably be better for Fall Ball, and hopefully 31' for Spring.

                  I will read your website for conditioning Joe. Do you know any effective weight gaining tricks? We've tried the protein drinks to no avail. Working out seems to make him even more lean with very little body fat.
                  My son too has a very difficult time gaining wait (ectomorph) but the one time he started gaining weight steadily was when he started working out with high intensity - literally over an hour per session 3 sessions/week (started out around 40 minutes but kept going up as the number of reps increased).

                  I laid out approximately what he did in that article in some detail, but the high level overview is that he did 5 sets of calisthenics with 2 minute rest periods in between each set. It's very important to do these on alternate days (i.e. MWF works), so there is a rest day in between. Also very important to eat heavy amounts of protein, most especially before/after the workout (i.e. if he works out after dinner - big dinner and big breakfast next AM full of protein).

                  He gained 5 pounds in about 3 months, from 84 to 89 pounds (and BTW, his pitching velocity went up around 4-5 MPH during that same time frame). And then he stopped doing such intense workouts and he plateaued for the next 6 months, literally gaining no weight at all. He is unable to stay motivated when he does it alone to push himself to his limits - he likes to have me around to push him to do the last couple reps that are really hard for each set of pullups, pushups, etc. But I haven't always had the time to watch his workouts and encourage him to push himself.

                  I can't over emphasize that when he dialed back on the workouts (from 60+ minutes to 30-40 minutes and not pushing himself super hard, and skimping through parts of it), there seems to be no weight gain at all. 30 minutes of not pushing to the limits just allowed him to maintain his numbers. You'll know the workouts are effective if the number of reps keeps going up each week. During that 3 month period my son went from doing around 3 pullups each set to doing around 10 pullups each set and one time, doing a test, was able to do 15 pullups. Now, after half a year of doing 2-4 workouts/month, he is unable to do more than 5 pullups per round.

                  We tried the protein shake thing at the advice of a baseball coach. I'm not convinced it did anything at all, but then again he only did it a few times.

                  When you read the article you'll see I refer to a book that is a program designed specifically for youth athletes, Progressive Plyometrics for kids. I thought following that book was more effective than the calisthenics for increasing his overall physical conditioning - for example his running speed increased considerably. But he did not gain any weight from doing the program outlined in the book, and he didn't finish it as he found it very boring to do with me helping him out, alone. Probably would have kept going if he were part of a group of kids doing it.

                  Hope that helps. I don't know all the answers either. I do know that the really intense workouts helped.
                  Last edited by JoeG; 08-08-2018, 08:49 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Kids don't gain weight or strength in appreciable amounts until their testosterone levels start to climb with puberty. There's nothing wrong with lifting and working out, just don't expect to see big jumps in strength until Uncle Pube comes to visit.
                    Put your junk in your pocket!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JoeG View Post

                      My son too has a very difficult time gaining wait (ectomorph) but the one time he started gaining weight steadily was when he started working out with high intensity - literally over an hour per session 3 sessions/week (started out around 40 minutes but kept going up as the number of reps increased).

                      I laid out approximately what he did in that article in some detail, but the high level overview is that he did 5 sets of calisthenics with 2 minute rest periods in between each set. It's very important to do these on alternate days (i.e. MWF works), so there is a rest day in between. Also very important to eat heavy amounts of protein, most especially before/after the workout (i.e. if he works out after dinner - big dinner and big breakfast next AM full of protein).

                      He gained 5 pounds in about 3 months, from 84 to 89 pounds (and BTW, his pitching velocity went up around 4-5 MPH during that same time frame). And then he stopped doing such intense workouts and he plateaued for the next 6 months, literally gaining no weight at all. He is unable to stay motivated when he does it alone to push himself to his limits - he likes to have me around to push him to do the last couple reps that are really hard for each set of pullups, pushups, etc. But I haven't always had the time to watch his workouts and encourage him to push himself.

                      I can't over emphasize that when he dialed back on the workouts (from 60+ minutes to 30-40 minutes and not pushing himself super hard, and skimping through parts of it), there seems to be no weight gain at all. 30 minutes of not pushing to the limits just allowed him to maintain his numbers. You'll know the workouts are effective if the number of reps keeps going up each week. During that 3 month period my son went from doing around 3 pullups each set to doing around 10 pullups each set and one time, doing a test, was able to do 15 pullups. Now, after half a year of doing 2-4 workouts/month, he is unable to do more than 5 pullups per round.

                      We tried the protein shake thing at the advice of a baseball coach. I'm not convinced it did anything at all, but then again he only did it a few times.

                      When you read the article you'll see I refer to a book that is a program designed specifically for youth athletes, Progressive Plyometrics for kids. I thought following that book was more effective than the calisthenics for increasing his overall physical conditioning - for example his running speed increased considerably. But he did not gain any weight from doing the program outlined in the book, and he didn't finish it as he found it very boring to do with me helping him out, alone. Probably would have kept going if he were part of a group of kids doing it.

                      Hope that helps. I don't know all the answers either. I do know that the really intense workouts helped.
                      The fastest, most effective way to gain strength in an untrained individual is through a program that uses compound movements over a linear progression. I don't fully drink the koolaid of all the starting strength folks, but their program is probably the best for 99% of people starting out. I didn't have my son do the bench pressing.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I second what Adam stated. My kid grew a lot over the past 18 months and was a bit on the thin side. He went on a lifting program and improved his eating and is sitting nicely at 99th percentile of BMI due to muscles and not obesity. He has a body fat comp under 15%

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sparkny2 View Post
                          I second what Adam stated. My kid grew a lot over the past 18 months and was a bit on the thin side. He went on a lifting program and improved his eating and is sitting nicely at 99th percentile of BMI due to muscles and not obesity. He has a body fat comp under 15%
                          My son added 30-40 lbs, over the winter, but part of the thought process was we knew the HS coach believed in running poles and he'd shed weight during the HS season, and that's what happened.

                          We did change his program over the summer and he now trains at a place where someone else that knows a lot more than me does his programming. Still lifts, but also integrates in more movement based exercises (Kinstretch).

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I will try to have him eat more and add more quality protein. Squats, push ups, pull ups, sprints with a bike up our hills to build his quads... this is what I think he can do. He has a a smaller frame/bones so he looks lean not skinny or weak. He has wide shoulders and narrow hips. I know it's not an ideal build for baseball, but he does fine and is capable of hitting balls to the mid outfield at this point.

                            He will start swimming soon and he is ripped when he's into the swim season. He swims 5 days a week...2 hour hard practices, all strokes. I don't know if the muscles used in swimming benefit a baseball player, but his core is super strong from swimming and I think this helps in just about every sport. I don't see him going all out at 14 to lift really hard to gain muscle mass, maybe at 15-16.



                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cooper21 View Post
                              e will start swimming soon and he is ripped when he's into the swim season. He swims 5 days a week...2 hour hard practices, all strokes. I don't know if the muscles used in swimming benefit a baseball player, but his core is super strong from swimming and I think this helps in just about every sport. I don't see him going all out at 14 to lift really hard to gain muscle mass, maybe at 15-16.
                              My 2022 is also a swimmer. I LOVE what the core strength gained in swimming has done for his baseball. Swimming workouts are unbelievably tough and work all muscle groups. That said, swim strokes are very linear - not necessarily athletic (multi-directional - multi-dimensional) movements so he also does crossfit and agility classes to develop general athleticism. So far that has been a terrific formula for him. FWIW.

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