Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Jason Werth "Super Nerds are killing the game"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Jason Werth "Super Nerds are killing the game"

    https://syndication.bleacherreport.c...-joke.amp.html


    They've got all these super nerds in the front office that know nothing about baseball but they like to project numbers and project players. ... I think it's killing the game. It's to the point where just put computers out there. Just put laptops and what have you, just put them out there and let them play. We don't even need to go out there anymore. It's a joke."


    "When they come down, these kids from MIT, Stanford, Harvard, wherever they're from, they've never played baseball in their life," he told Eskin. "When they come down to talk about stuff like [shifts], should I just bunt it over there? They're like, 'No, don't do that. We don't want you to do that. We want you to hit a homer.'

    "It's just not baseball to me. We're creating something that's not fun to watch. It's boring. You're turning players into robots. You've taken the human element out of the game."




    Agree?
    Disagree?
    Thoughts?

  • #2
    I think baseball is an interesting sport to be a fan of because there are so many stats and opportunities to draw conclusions and test hypotheses with the data.

    I feel like the more I learn about the game, the more I enjoy watching it...

    Comment


    • #3
      Meanwhile according to Forbes, MLB has set revenue records for 15 consecutive seasons. While in person attendance has declined for 6 straight years, the revenue from non-traditional sources is exploding.

      Werth is just bitter as he has realized that his life peaked at 32 and he will not be able to get a gig to sit around dugouts, spit tobacco and give bad hitting advice.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by KylesDad View Post
        Meanwhile according to Forbes, MLB has set revenue records for 15 consecutive seasons. While in person attendance has declined for 6 straight years, the revenue from non-traditional sources is exploding.

        Werth is just bitter as he has realized that his life peaked at 32 and he will not be able to get a gig to sit around dugouts, spit tobacco and give bad hitting advice.
        Poor Jason Werth and his 130 millions. Btw baseball revenue is not up from non traditional sources, the mlb tv stuff has grown a lot but the vast majority of revenue is still from cable deals.
        I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dominik View Post

          Poor Jason Werth and his 130 millions. Btw baseball revenue is not up from non traditional sources, the mlb tv stuff has grown a lot but the vast majority of revenue is still from cable deals.
          LOL - I'm old enough that I still consider cable "non traditional"

          Comment


          • #6
            Like all things Jason Werth there is some good and bad in what he's saying, mostly good. He was a heckuva player, a "gamer", and was a big part of successful teams, championship teams. But he had a downside- he ran Jim Riggleman out of D.C. and the Nats would probably have two rings by now if they'd kept him, not that the other managers were bad. Jason "Weird" has always marched to his own drummer as a big time, hard nosed player who was not particularly bright. Then again, it's often a plus to not be particularly bright in baseball- that's what he's saying.
            Major Figure

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SuicideSqueeze View Post
              https://syndication.bleacherreport.c...-joke.amp.html


              They've got all these super nerds in the front office that know nothing about baseball but they like to project numbers and project players. ... I think it's killing the game. It's to the point where just put computers out there. Just put laptops and what have you, just put them out there and let them play. We don't even need to go out there anymore. It's a joke."


              "When they come down, these kids from MIT, Stanford, Harvard, wherever they're from, they've never played baseball in their life," he told Eskin. "When they come down to talk about stuff like [shifts], should I just bunt it over there? They're like, 'No, don't do that. We don't want you to do that. We want you to hit a homer.'

              "It's just not baseball to me. We're creating something that's not fun to watch. It's boring. You're turning players into robots. You've taken the human element out of the game."




              Agree?
              Disagree?
              Thoughts?
              For the most part, I disagree. I don't know what he faces day to day and if there really are nerds from MIT telling him what to do, but I doubt these nerds have as much power as he states. Every smart coach uses data and statistics to make decisions. Even "back in the day" people would know pitchers tendencies to throw certain pitches at certain counts. They know certain hitters like certain pitches and not other pitches. Using data is just an evolution of what has been done for years. And I personally find complaints about shifts absurd. On the one hand, you have old school baseball players talking about how kids need to learn to hit the ball into the gaps, on the other hand, you have pros that can't do anything but pull the ball. Don't complain about shifts, gain more skills as a hitter and beat the shift. Forcing players to play in a specific spot on the field kills creativity and strategy, and in my opinion, leads to less exciting.

              There will always be a human element to the game. But you have to let strategy and coaching have a place too, otherwise, it becomes less interesting.
              Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

              Comment


              • #8
                He said it was a joke...funny just like his contract extension.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I coached against Jason when he was in high school. At that time, he was a catcher. I agree to a point. The more that the homer is the criteria for a hitter, it seems the less batting average is important. I hate what is happening and I just can't believe that when the shift is on, hitters just don't lay a bunt down. They have been told, heck with the base hit. I say, get on base, increase that average, the fans will cheer the bunt and laugh at those who shifted and the next hitter can do whatever. "Whatever" would include those things no longer present in MLB for so many teams including the hit and run, the run and hit, the sacrifice bunt, the steal, ... I am a Cardinal's fan. The difference in that team since the firing of Matheney is that the team is now running. Heck, Carpenter stole his first base in 3 or 4 years and he is our leadoff hitter. Yadi has brought his average up with hit and runs and hitting behind the runner. Hitting behind the runner is a lost art since, I'm sure some analysis has told them to hit home runs instead.
                  Granny said Sonny stick to your guns if you believe in something no matter what. Because it's better to be hated for who you are than to be loved for who you're not.

                  I am an ex expert. I've done this long enough to know that those who think that they know it all, know nothing.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Who cares...? He still hits nukes... LOL!!!

                    https://twitter.com/BasebaIlKing/sta...75607726022657
                    I don't like my balls to smell like pickles.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I hate Sabremetrics. I hate all the stats they created to give themselves value in the hiring market. I hate that they think walks are so great when the 2018 Mets have more of them than the 2018 Red Sox. I hate that no one will admit that WAR is made up of completely arbitrary factors, like a score you'd give a figure skater. I hate that they idolize Lucroy when he's never seemed to make a difference on a team. I hate that that they don't pluralize RBIs. And I hate that they totally missed the 2015 Kansas City Royals who did everything Sabremetrically wrong (swung freely, stole bases, never walked) and were the most exciting team in baseball by far.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In 1957 the MLB batting average was .258. (25.8%)

                        In 2017 the MLB batting average was .255. (25.5%)

                        That's one less hit every 300 at-bats.



                        Skip

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Baseball 100 View Post
                          I hate Sabremetrics..... I hate that they totally missed the 2015 Kansas City Royals who did everything Sabremetrically wrong (swung freely, stole bases, never walked) and were the most exciting team in baseball by far.
                          Great post!
                          I enjoyed the 2015 Royals!!!

                          Skip

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            In the big picture analytics work. But I question any process that says Aaron Judge is a better defensive outfielder than Mookie Betts. And no one has come up with analytics for mental toughness.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cannonball View Post
                              I hate what is happening and I just can't believe that when the shift is on, hitters just don't lay a bunt down. They have been told, heck with the base hit. I say, get on base, increase that average, the fans will cheer the bunt and laugh at those who shifted and the next hitter can do whatever. "
                              I'm baffled by this as well. Mud posted an interesting article concerning Albert Pujols the other day. My question is this... If the defense puts a shift on you, but you counter it by hitting the ball the other way 2 or 3 times, wouldn't the defense then counter by adjusting the shift? Laying down a bunt or hitting the other way doesn't need to be a permanent strategy. Just keep the defense honest so you can do your thing.
                              "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X