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Rotator cuff tendinitis

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  • Rotator cuff tendinitis

    Anyone have any experience with this?

    About 8 weeks ago, my son's arm went dead. We thought it was fatigue. But, it continued. He would rest it for a bit and it would feel better. But, then, when he started throwing again, it would start to hurt all over again.

    It was fine hitting and doing anything else. But, really hurt and impacted his throwing.

    We finally were able to get him into an orthopedist about a week ago and he says it's rotator cuff tendinitis. Rest is prescribed but no PT or anything else.

    Concerning thing is that it was pain free when he went into the orthopedist because he was not throwing. So, the orthopedist manipulated his arm and shoulder until the pain started. And, now, since that happened, my son says it hurts all the time, even when doing nothing. So, we started him on motrin.
    Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

  • #2
    I've had rotator cuff repair on both shoulders, a torn labrum on the R shoulder, and I've been to the OS recently with what I suspect is another torn RC on the R shoulder. I got a cortisone shot. I gave it a month and the first time I tried push ups, the pain was coming back. I told my buddy/OS that I wanted to get through deer season and then we will get an MRI and move forward.

    So yes, I have experience- what's the question?
    Put your junk in your pocket!

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    • #3
      Without surgery, what's the typical recovery period? Is it a chronic thing, reoccurring, once you've had it? Questions like that...
      Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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      • #4
        Shut down all throwing for 2 months. Once he is pain free again, wait 1 to 2 weeks then start doing rotator cuff exercises (easy to google). Start light. Also stretches (again, google it). After 2 months of strengthening go back to throwing, slow and easy. Gradually increase. He will likely feel good and shorten all the times o listed, main thing is if the shoulder starts hurting, back off and rest. If want more details, let me know.

        orthopod probably did impingement test, so it got irritated. Pain should go away with rest and anti inflammatory.
        Never played baseball, just a dad of someone that loves to play. So take any advice I post with a grain of salt.

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        • #5
          I would say regardless of pain shut him down from all throwing for 2-3 months, this problem is nothing to mess with. This would probably mean no fall ball for him, he can continue hitting.

          still seek a doctor and professional treatment. Again those shoulder injuries can be very dangerous and lead to a rotator cuff tear which can be career threatening.
          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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          • #6
            Shut him down asap

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            • #7
              Thanks guys!

              He had a lot of games this year. Season started early April and he played in 44 games over 16 weeks. And, by my estimate, he caught around 35 of those 44 games. And, when he catches, he's usually back there for the full game. I'm sure that is the root cause, in hindsight. Lesson learned!
              Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                Without surgery, what's the typical recovery period? Is it a chronic thing, reoccurring, once you've had it? Questions like that...
                Who knows whether or not it is a chronic issue; only time will tell. The problem with shoulders is that there is not a lot of blood supply to bring in the healing nutrients. I would definitely shut him down for the remainder of the summer and for fall. Once he starts high school ball, it's going to be a hard, long, intense grind. I'm not sure what his high school's baseball practices are like, but around here they are 3 to 4 hours per day, 5 days per week. My son will start bullpens before Thanksgiving and that will continue practices through summer ball. That's a lot of baseball. I would give your son 6 weeks off and then start with the shoulder exercises as recommended above, and I would gradually incorporate some strengthening with band work.
                Last edited by 2022dad; 08-24-2018, 05:39 AM.
                Put your junk in your pocket!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                  Anyone have any experience with this?

                  ...So, we started him on motrin.
                  My son swears that Turmeric is more helpful than Advil/Motrin when his arm is sore....may want to check it out.

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                  • #10
                    There's no real evidence that tumeric is effective. Lots of anecdotal reports and studies done by parties with a vested interest in favorable outcomes. But repeated, double blind studies haven't substantiated the claims of its effectiveness.
                    Put your junk in your pocket!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                      Thanks guys!

                      He had a lot of games this year. Season started early April and he played in 44 games over 16 weeks. And, by my estimate, he caught around 35 of those 44 games. And, when he catches, he's usually back there for the full game. I'm sure that is the root cause, in hindsight. Lesson learned!
                      In 14u I had two catchers I knew could eventually play college ball if they wanted it and continued to develop (they did). When I got them late May they had already played fourteen middle school games. One caught seven and pitched seven. One caught all fourteen.

                      In travel we played fifty games in eleven weeks. The two catchers alternated catching about twenty games each. They never caught two straight. When we had a pool play doormat the third and fourth (emergency catchers) split the game.

                      It’s a marathon not a sprint. Sometimes catching more games is just nothing but more. Development training and applying it in an adequate number of games is enough catching. Especially during a period when a lot of physical development is occurring.

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                      • #12
                        In school ball, he caught ALL THE TIME. He was a weapon back there and the drop-off to the next guy was huge. And, the middle school coach didn't care about the long term...

                        On travel, he was the starter but alternated games. So, if they had 3 games, he was catching 2 of them. And, they had 10 tournaments, so, it all added up...

                        again...lesson learned! No more travel ball while school ball is happening.
                        Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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                        • #13
                          My kid was lucky and he only played 12-14 games for middle school due to rain outs in the spring, but he caught all the games. He split time with @f2 on his travel but ended up catching less due to injuries on the team and he was mainly placed in the OF for his speed. So he ended up catching less than 25 games out of the 50+ games he played from April to August. I am very pleased.

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                          • #14
                            My daughter was diagnosed with Rotator Cuff Syndrom, Bicep Tendonitis and Bursitis. She was shut down for 8 weeks and then started PT. It was determined at that time that she had GIRD (Glenohumeral Internal Rotation Deficit). She is doing much better now without surgery. But the shutdown was key.
                            "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

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                            • #15
                              I was diagnosed with rotator cuff tendentious back in Feb (non-dominant arm). Caused by lifting. I had an x-ray followed by MRI. They didn't see any tears so I think they just defaulted to that. I had a steroid shot, which helped for a little while. Now 6 months later, with PT, and going to a personal trainer it's still not 100%. But, I'm also 44 ;-).

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