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  • New catcher's gear certification

    Haven't seen much on this and actually received an email about it the other day. I told one of our catcher's parents about this. Good thing as they were looking at buying new gear for high school next year.

    https://www.justbatreviews.com/blog/...ertifications/

    https://www.nfhs.org/articles/high-s...player-safety/




  • #2
    Thanks for sharing. 2020 is the start date I read from an email I received fro. Jbr

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sparkny2 View Post
      Thanks for sharing. 2020 is the start date I read from an email I received fro. Jbr
      Yup. I told them to either wait a year when more certified chest protectors are on the market or if they were still going to buy new gear now, make sure to purchase a chest protector that was certified. No point in buying a new chest protector that is not certified and then having to buy a now one again in a year.

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      • #4
        Strange - the JBR feature says:
        NOCSAE Certified Chest Protectors
        Brand Model Ages
        All Star CCCP1216 12 to 16
        All Star CPCC1216S7X 12 to 16

        And, I have a CPCC1216S7X that we just bought this summer. But, it doesn't say, anywhere on it, that it's NOCSAE certified.
        Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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        • #5
          THIS https://www.nfhs.org/sports-resource...-changes-2018/
          also says:

          1-5-3: The catcher shall wear, in addition to a head protector, a mask with a throat protector, body/chest protector that meets the NOCSAE standard at the time of manufacture (Effective January 1, 2020), protective cup (male only), and baseball protective shin guards.

          So, now, they are going to make HS catchers wear the (stupid) Yeager flap?
          Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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          • #6
            If there was a flaw with current gear's safety, why are they waiting a year to implement this? Are umpires really going to be looking for new stamps on catcher's gear and throwing players out of the game if they record a put out?

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            • #7
              This is what it's all about: Commotio Cordis
              • More than 224 cases have been reported to the US Commotio Cordis Registry since 1995, however its estimated that many more cases have not been reported.
              • Based on the Registry cases of commotio cordis the survival rate was 24%.
              • 95% of cases affected males.
              • Commotio cordis most frequently occurs in those aged between 10 and 18 years, however cases have been documented between the age of 7 weeks to 51 years-old.
              • 50% of episodes occur during competitive sports, a further 25% occur during recreational sports, and the other 25% occurs during other activities that involve blunt force trauma to the chest wall, e.g. kick by a horse, violence act.
              • Baseball has the highest incidence of commotio cordis, followed by softball, hockey, then the football codes.
              Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

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              • #8
                So this is based on a total of 10 cases per year with 7.5 cases in sports and those 7.5 cases 2 of those are survived, so that leaves 5.5 incidents per year to be distributed amongst all of the millions of participants in baseball, softball, hockey, football and others.

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                • #9
                  PROFIT!!!, PROFIT!!!, safety, PROFIT!!!, PROFIT!!! Yet they still let slowpitch softball players run around the bases without a helmet. Wasn't that the #1 baseball/softball related killer? Thrown balls hitting baserunners in the temple?

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                  • #10
                    They are doing this at the HS level, and, amazingly, Little League has yet to make heart guards mandatory. So, yeah, it's probably overkill.
                    Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                      THIS https://www.nfhs.org/sports-resource...-changes-2018/
                      also says:

                      1-5-3: The catcher shall wear, in addition to a head protector, a mask with a throat protector, body/chest protector that meets the NOCSAE standard at the time of manufacture (Effective January 1, 2020), protective cup (male only), and baseball protective shin guards.

                      So, now, they are going to make HS catchers wear the (stupid) Yeager flap?
                      The "mask with throat protector" has been in the rules book for awhile. Here the hockey style mask meets the requirement without the dangle thing you see in LL.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        At least catchers gear gets pretty nasty, so it's not the worst thing in the world to get new gear every couple years.

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                        • #13
                          We got the All Star NOCSAE chest protector today. Holy Cow! The chest piece is so hard and thick. Feels like it could stop an arrow and you wouldn't even feel it or get a scratch.
                          Coaching experience: Managed 5 Little League teams and coached on 4 others. So, what do I know?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                            We got the All Star NOCSAE chest protector today. Holy Cow! The chest piece is so hard and thick. Feels like it could stop an arrow and you wouldn't even feel it or get a scratch.
                            I take it that this is an improvement from their older System7 gear where the chest protector was somewhat spongy.
                            Sent from my mobile device... probably while driving...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Francis7 View Post
                              This is what it's all about: Commotio Cordis
                              • More than 224 cases have been reported to the US Commotio Cordis Registry since 1995, however its estimated that many more cases have not been reported.
                              • Based on the Registry cases of commotio cordis the survival rate was 24%.
                              • 95% of cases affected males.
                              • Commotio cordis most frequently occurs in those aged between 10 and 18 years, however cases have been documented between the age of 7 weeks to 51 years-old.
                              • 50% of episodes occur during competitive sports, a further 25% occur during recreational sports, and the other 25% occurs during other activities that involve blunt force trauma to the chest wall, e.g. kick by a horse, violence act.
                              • Baseball has the highest incidence of commotio cordis, followed by softball, hockey, then the football codes.
                              OK, let's ferret this out a little bit. First, commotio cordis can only happen when a the moon, sun, and all the planets align perfectly, and the "precordial thump" happens exactly in the precise fraction of a second the ventricles are repolarizing, and the hit has to be in the exact right location, at the exact right pressure...and why the actual numbers are really very low (10 total incidences per year, 5 of those in "competitive sports", and let's give baseball 3 of those five, and that doesn't differentiate those of catchers vs. others on the field...pitchers for instance) compared to other sudden death scenarios. As in....
                              • Commotio cordis in baseball - 3 fatalities per year in the U.S.
                              • Furniture tipping over on someone - 12 fatalities per year in the U.S.
                              • Lightning strikes - 20 fatalities per year in the U.S.
                              • Killed by a cow - 20 fatalities per year in the U.S.
                              • Killed by a dog - 30-40 fatalities per year in the U.S.
                              • Killed while riding a bike - 722 fatalities per year in the U.S.
                              So there's a 4 times greater chance that the chest of drawers in the corner will get you than commotio cordis in a baseball game, and a 240 times greater chance the Schwinn Stingray we used to ride would be our demise than getting smacked in the chest at the exact right moment with a baseball to do us in...but yet let's start handwringing, certifying, and mandating equipment rules to make everyone think they're going to be a whole lot safer than they already are.
                              Just imagine the mass panic we'd have if a "killer cow" happened to wander down onto or near the field.....RUUUUNNNNN!!!!!!
                              In memory of "Catchingcoach" - Dave Weaver: February 28, 1955 - June 17, 2011

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