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More K's than Hits in 2018 - What's Going On?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mattun View Post
    The Runs Per Game are closer to the Steroid Era than before it...
    Actually, runs per game in modern MLB are remarkably similar to the Good Old Days.

    Runs per team per game:

    2018: 4.45


    1948: 4.58

    1938: 4.89

    1928: 4.73

    https://www.baseball-reference.com/l.../MLB/bat.shtml
    Last edited by skipper5; 11-08-2018, 11:51 AM.
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    • #17
      Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
      I'd say a combination of pitching velo increase over the course of time and drafting players based upon size, speed and projection rather than drafting players who can actually play the game.
      No one goes undiscovered anymore. Ultimately the talented rise to the majors. It’s usually the biggest and fastest who can play the game.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by skipper5 View Post

        Actually, runs per game in modern MLB are remarkably similar to the Good Old Days.

        Runs per team per game:

        2018: 4.45


        1948: 4.58

        1938: 4.89

        1928: 4.73

        https://www.baseball-reference.com/l.../MLB/bat.shtml
        20s and 30s were an extremely high scoring era.
        I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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        • #19
          I don’t believe the number of runs is the big issue. The issue is the process. The way the game is played now is getting boring. 5ere are too many whiffs and pop ups. As a Red Sox fan I wasn’t on the edge of my seat in extra innings. It was boring. I was on the edge of reading on my iPad.

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          • #20
            The runs are now achieved in less innings. A game now might have 7 zero frames but 5 runs created by a 2 run double and a 3 run homer while in the other 7 innings nothing happens.
            I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

              No one goes undiscovered anymore. Ultimately the talented rise to the majors. It’s usually the biggest and fastest who can play the game.
              I don't believe this. A 6'7" kid who hit 48 HR the last 2 years at a top D2 program went undrafted. As for those "biggest and fastest", they are striking out more than ever. That doesn't seem those are the league is full of players "who can play the game".

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              • #22
                baseball 100,

                “I'm genuinely curious about the feedback here so please share your thoughts”
                I see it as the “all rotational” morphed ”launch angle” batting approach's as of late as having a lot to do with it.

                In the past pitchers were taught to stay at the knees generally so the swings were pushed to handle this area predominantly. Now the pitchers have discovered the safety, higher Velo of Sinkers (lateral movers) then High fastball Kill pitches.Forearm pronated drives and inwards rotation of their Humerus's to drive the ball that will befuddle batters even more This is only going to get worse for batters as the trend in pitching is going towards. When pitchers finally discover the forearm pronated versions of the Curve, Slider and fastball it will take another leap because the will be no more TJ injuries and all the best will keep going.
                Primum non nocere

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
                  I don't believe this. A 6'7" kid who hit 48 HR the last 2 years at a top D2 program went undrafted. As for those "biggest and fastest", they are striking out more than ever. That doesn't seem those are the league is full of players "who can play the game".
                  Maybe the scouts saw holes in his game. Not playing D1 leaves questions unanswered unless he played summer ball in a name collegiate summer league. Typically position players aren’t taller than 6’4” (save posting the handful of exceptions). Very tall players tend to have big holes in their swing and aren’t agile enough in the field.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

                    Maybe the scouts saw holes in his game. Not playing D1 leaves questions unanswered unless he played summer ball in a name collegiate summer league. Typically position players aren’t taller than 6’4” (save posting the handful of exceptions). Very tall players tend to have big holes in their swing and aren’t agile enough in the field.
                    I assume you know this, but scouts recommend players regularly who don't get drafted by the Club. The "handful of exceptions" can play ball. Your comment lends itself to my point that Clubs hurt themselves by limiting their talent pool to what they see as ideal ht/wt, etc. There is no such thing. It's like the BS that a 6'6" hard throwing pitcher will likely have less chance of injury than a short, hard thrower or the downward angle of a taller pitcher is harder to hit than a short guy. It's amazing with all that "logic" in pro baseball that now they are trying to make adjustments to the launch angle era by pitching up in the strike zone, which is a flatter pitch.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
                      I'd say a combination of pitching velo increase over the course of time and drafting players based upon size, speed and projection rather than drafting players who can actually play the game.
                      What if the huge kid can’t run, field or throw?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

                        What if the huge kid can’t run, field or throw?
                        then he can play in the AL

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                        • #27
                          Teams do occasionally take a D3 player who hit .350 with 20 homers in the 30th round and those players quite rarely become anything. Statistical dominance is nice but in mlb tools matter and often guys who beat up on weaker competition don't have the tools to play in mlb. They dominated against 82mph D3 fastballs but then in they face 94 in A ball which is a big difference.

                          occasionally there are undertooled performers who just never stop hitting (like tyler white who was a guy dominating weaker college levels - albeit it was still D1 for him) but this is quite rare.

                          mlb just doesn't have to take the great performers with sub par athleticism (whether it is a hitter with a great approach, eye and swing and average bat speed or the pitcher with great command throwing 86) because they get enough athletes to find a few who can play.
                          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JettSixty View Post

                            It’s hard to argue with what has proven to produce the most runs. But I’m starting to find MLB baseball unwatchable. I used to focus on the game. Now I read and look up when I hear the announcer’s voice rise.

                            .
                            Some of the playoff games reminded me of the simulated games at the end of a showcase. Pitchers come in to throw to about 5 total batters and dominate. Hitters are always facing a pitcher who is rested and focused. At the last one I went to there were 3 hits in 15 innings.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by The Uncoach View Post
                              I'd say a combination of pitching velo increase over the course of time and drafting players based upon size, speed and projection rather than drafting players who can actually play the game.
                              So true. And this is poisoning youth baseball, especially travel/select.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by switchhitter View Post

                                So true. And this is poisoning youth baseball, especially travel/select.
                                It only works in travel through 13u recruiting early bloomers. By 14u the playing field starts to balance as most kids hit puberty. The recruiting coaches get exposed for not being able to teach and develop players.

                                When I put together my 13u team I selected thirteen LL all stars from across the eighteen league district I felt had the potential to become high school baseball players. I also researched their demeanor and their parents. I replaced three players at 14u and added two more for 16u. Every kid played varsity in high school. Most of them played college ball at some level. Some of these kids were small in 13u. But they could play. They were athletes. They had speed. They hit line drives. And they had 6’+ dads.
                                Last edited by JettSixty; 11-12-2018, 02:07 AM.

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