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Drills/Exercises to Improve Lateral Quickness

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  • #16
    Soccer might be even better, but you didn't hear me say it.


    However, I think the cognitive part of agility is very different in basketball or soccer or even ping pong and may not transfer well at all.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by bbrages View Post
      Soccer might be even better, but you didn't hear me say it.


      However, I think the cognitive part of agility is very different in basketball or soccer or even ping pong and may not transfer well at all.
      Sure baseball related drills might be better but no where close to a real baseball game situation and not much better than
      putting somebody in an athletic situation where they have to react.

      I remember that as I got older I would be able to get an early read on a ground ball from the pitch location
      and the hitter's swing. It wasn't something I consciously did just took lots of game reps.
      Last edited by pattar; 03-21-2019, 10:16 AM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by bbrages View Post
        Soccer might be even better, but you didn't hear me say it.


        However, I think the cognitive part of agility is very different in basketball or soccer or even ping pong and may not transfer well at all.
        I don't think improving your lateral quickness is work selling your soul, but that's just me

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        • #19
          This game is all about reaction except for pitchers throwing. In a structured bp setting the fielders and base runners can be exposed to exactly the same type of reactions they will see in a championship game. Not so for hitters, pitchers, and catchers but for the rest the live reactions are like gold.
          Major Figure

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          • #20
            The kids that play soccer, in the off season, do usually have better footwork. Tennis is even better, its all lateral short sprints. I think its one of the best crosstrains for baseball. Lots of swinging, chasing balls and footwork.

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            • #21
              Thanks all! My son actually plays soccer and basketball (his two other sports right now) but basketball season just finished and soccer won't start until fall.

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              • #22
                For basketball, my team frequently uses the Lane Agility Drill. It would be good training for baseball players as well...especially MIF.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by bbrages View Post

                  At present, no agreement on a precise definition of agility within the sports science community exists. The term is applied to a broad range of sport contexts, but with such great inconsistency, it further complicates our understanding of what trainable components may enhance agility. A new definition of agility is proposed: “a rapid whole-body movement with change of velocity or direction in response to a stimulus”. Agility has relationships with trainable physical qualities such as strength, power and technique, as well as cognitive components such as visual-scanning techniques, visual-scanning speed and anticipation. Agility testing is generally confined to tests of physical components such as change of direction speed, or cognitive components such as anticipation and pattern recognition. New tests of agility that combine physical and cognitive measures are encouraged.

                  ^
                  this is the abstract of a scholarly article on agility (https://shapeamerica.tandfonline.com...9#.XJO2L2N7mUk)

                  Note also this abstract (emphasis is mine):

                  This review explores the differences between agility in invasion sports (defined as including reactive decision-making) and change-of-direction speed (CODS), and highlights the implications for training. Correlations between agility tests and CODS tests indicate that they represent independent skills. Agility tests discriminate higher- from lower-standard athletes better than CODS tests, indicating that the cognitive element of agility is important to performance. Training studies have shown that the development of strength qualities can transfer to gains in CODS, but this has never been shown for agility. There is some evidence that the importance of physical qualities is greater for CODS than for agility. It was concluded that the reactive element should be included in agility training, testing and research. While there appears to be no research evidence for the benefits of strength and power training, there is some support for the use of small-sided games for improving agility.

                  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs...-9541.10.1.159

                  I think you are absolutely correct that there is both a cognitive and physical aspect to agility.
                  When I first read this thread, I had to look up the 5-10-5 Pro Agility Drill, and eventually came across this website/article: https://www.scienceforsport.com/agility/

                  The embedded youtube video is impressive - the guy's feet are a blur. But the article does a good job (and may be based on the above studies) of differentiating b/w traditional "agility drills" (ladders, cones), which really only measure the change of direction (COD) speed, vs. "reaction" drills, which measure reaction times to some type of stimuli.

                  It doesn't discourage my use of agility ladders - I think they're still beneficial from a "learning how to move" perspective - but I have begun to re-evaluate the importance of more decision making drills / games during practices [decision making = both reactive (stimuli) and proactive (baseball/softball IQ, game situations)]

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by illinoisguy View Post
                    but basketball season just finished
                    Doesn't mean he cannot still play 3 on 3 pickup with his pals..those are more fun anyway

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Gags View Post

                      When I first read this thread, I had to look up the 5-10-5 Pro Agility Drill, and eventually came across this website/article: https://www.scienceforsport.com/agility/

                      The embedded youtube video is impressive - the guy's feet are a blur. But the article does a good job (and may be based on the above studies) of differentiating b/w traditional "agility drills" (ladders, cones), which really only measure the change of direction (COD) speed, vs. "reaction" drills, which measure reaction times to some type of stimuli.

                      It doesn't discourage my use of agility ladders - I think they're still beneficial from a "learning how to move" perspective - but I have begun to re-evaluate the importance of more decision making drills / games during practices [decision making = both reactive (stimuli) and proactive (baseball/softball IQ, game situations)]
                      Very informative. The place my kid trains at uses a combination of COD and reactive Agility stimuli (reaction to lights). Some of the stimuli training also includes expand/contract resistance bands which adds a set of strength/balance elements. I think COD and Agility are both highly beneficial to baseball players and I can now see why they are used in multiple combinations.

                      Not to brag, but my kid made a play at second base the other day and my first thought was about the training.....

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by fly996 View Post

                        The place my kid trains at uses a combination of COD and reactive Agility stimuli (reaction to lights). Some of the stimuli training also includes expand/contract resistance bands which adds a set of strength/balance elements.
                        Interesting..still think hoops is more fun
                        Last edited by pattar; 03-26-2019, 02:28 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by pattar View Post
                          Doesn't mean he cannot still play 3 on 3 pickup with his pals..those are more fun anyway
                          No basketball during baseball season. Jam a finger or sprain an ankle.
                          Major Figure

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by omg View Post

                            No basketball during baseball season. Jam a finger or sprain an ankle.
                            Ok then...your kid is how old??? During baseball season many moons ago I broke two fingers jumping for a ball in a spirited game of kickball in recess when I was in 5th grade..does he get to go outside for recess (assuming he is young enough to still have it) or is that a no-no too? Come to think of it, maybe those two broken fingers at the age of 12 is why I am a desk jockey now instead of collecting a MLB pension..
                            Last edited by pattar; 03-26-2019, 07:23 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by fly996 View Post

                              Very informative. The place my kid trains at uses a combination of COD and reactive Agility stimuli (reaction to lights). Some of the stimuli training also includes expand/contract resistance bands which adds a set of strength/balance elements. I think COD and Agility are both highly beneficial to baseball players and I can now see why they are used in multiple combinations.

                              Not to brag, but my kid made a play at second base the other day and my first thought was about the training.....
                              The catch is that reacting to a light isn't the same as reacting to a batted ball... Is there some transfer? I don't know....

                              http://learntocoachbasketball.com/li...active-agility

                              It seems to me that the best drill for teaching lateral agility is to hit a kid a bunch of fungoes...
                              Last edited by bbrages; 03-27-2019, 06:53 AM.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by illinoisguy View Post
                                for my 10 year old son to improve lateral quickness for infield range.
                                More important than anything is having a "I want to make a play" mentality the instant the pitch approaches the plate.

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