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Deep barrel turn / turn behind the turn

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  • bluedawg
    replied
    Originally posted by skipper5 View Post

    My HS guys this fall can't do this. I wish I could teach it.
    But we're pretty good at hitting straight pitches.
    definitely not easy to do. lots of kids are go on foot touch and can't disconnect their hands from their rotation. this is where I think that the deep/early barrel turn with the hands really excels vs. turning the barrel into the ball with just the body because everything is "connected". heck just fouling off a good breaking pitch or 2 to get to a FB can be huge during an AB.

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  • skipper5
    replied
    Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

    yes -b/c you can
    3) adjust to speed, allowing you to stay through a changeup and/or easily adjust to a breaking pitch and still drive it well enough for a blooper over F4
    My HS guys this fall can't do this. I wish I could teach it.
    But we're pretty good at hitting straight pitches.

    Leave a comment:


  • omg
    replied
    Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

    yes -b/c you can
    1) hit the ball harder -this usually speaks for itself
    2) adjust to location easier, allowing you to hit the ball harder throughout the strike zone
    3) adjust to speed, allowing you to stay through a changeup and/or easily adjust to a breaking pitch and still drive it well enough for a blooper over F4
    Yes, assuming you don't then yank the bat off path by spinning your front hip.

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  • bluedawg
    replied
    Originally posted by JayHarn3 View Post
    Hey guys,

    this may sound stupid request but I have been going back-and-forth with my nephew about this discussion and swing approach. Like most teenagers, they don’t want to take the word from someone who is close to them and listen. Would anybody be willing to just give a quick short summary of why the barrel turn is so important for hitting? I would greatly appreciate it, thanks…
    yes -b/c you can
    1) hit the ball harder -this usually speaks for itself
    2) adjust to location easier, allowing you to hit the ball harder throughout the strike zone
    3) adjust to speed, allowing you to stay through a changeup and/or easily adjust to a breaking pitch and still drive it well enough for a blooper over F4

    Leave a comment:


  • baseabllmom
    replied
    How else do you punch the ball with an uppercut?

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  • JayHarn3
    replied
    Hey guys,

    this may sound stupid request but I have been going back-and-forth with my nephew about this discussion and swing approach. Like most teenagers, they don’t want to take the word from someone who is close to them and listen. Would anybody be willing to just give a quick short summary of why the barrel turn is so important for hitting? I would greatly appreciate it, thanks…

    Leave a comment:


  • dominik
    replied
    Btw IMO the barrel shouldn't turn back completely as the elbow drops. The barrel does go back some, but the top hand supination doesn't start before the elbow is almost down. You don't want to slot then swing but you don't want to lay back the bat immediately either.


    See this video. His shoulders tilt and he does that "elbow seesaw" but initially bat and shoulder relationship doesn't change. When elbow is like 2/3rd down he starts to supinate and release the barrel.

    https://www.coachseye.com/v/efa5f657...5a43b4672ad4c7

    I'm teaching that seesaw move like this
    https://twitter.com/dominikkeul/stat...633859584?s=19

    might do a progression for the top hand like this

    https://twitter.com/dominikkeul/stat...679963648?s=19

    and then blend the seesaw into the supination like this
    https://twitter.com/dominikkeul/stat...951863296?s=19

    I feel this usually leads to a more compact turn
    Last edited by dominik; 09-10-2019, 06:52 AM.

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  • bman52
    replied
    Thanks RD. We will work on that and see where it goes. (I know we messaged about this some last year) My son is left handed and he retooled his swing to a more "out from" swing last year and he hits opposite field well, problem is he gets stuck only going opposite field and he fouls off anything on the inside half of the plate where his real power has always been. It hasn't been a big issue because he hits well and rarely strikes out. He hits well to the left center gap and that is where he gets all his extra base hits now that we have changed to this less around the body swing. I am trying to marry together the pull power that he used to have when he swung around his body with the quicker swing that allows him to go oppo with better plate coverage and he seems to be either or right now. He can look inside and crush it if it is there (reverting to his old swing), or he can use his newer swing and hit opposite field.

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  • rdbass
    replied
    I started by teaching my DD to hit opposite field off the tee. I feel that teaches to hit 'out from' instead of 'around' the body.

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  • bman52
    replied
    Thanks rd.
    When I look at the next two frames I see that as the rear arm goes from bent to extending toward the ball (about the location it passes the line pant stripe) the bat is let out of the perpendicular relationship to the back arm. Is there something that is taught about how that happens, or is it just something that happens and the batter figures it out?

    Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • rdbass
    replied
    Originally posted by bman52 View Post
    rd,

    I get that the bat starts its rotation around the forearm (perpendicular to the forearm). I get the early bat speed. The thing that has always hung me up is that the bat is not perpendicular to the rear forearm at contact. How, when and what starts the transition away from rotation around the rear forearm to the bat path into the ball? Not sure if that makes sense. What are the next two frames in your last two GIFS.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • bman52
    replied
    Colonel,
    If you watch your second clip at the 2 frames right at contact you see the barrel release from being perpendicular to the rear forearm and you even see the rear hand make a hammer type flexion. I am not saying that it is actually pushing as I don't think it is, I think it is more of a releasing it to travel type thing. In your first clip the barrel releases from perpendicular even sooner. Just trying to figure out exactly where that release from perpendicular happens as your forearm can only rotate so far.

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  • Colonel21
    replied
    Last edited by Colonel21; 09-04-2019, 02:06 PM.

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  • Colonel21
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • bman52
    replied
    rd,

    I get that the bat starts its rotation around the forearm (perpendicular to the forearm). I get the early bat speed. The thing that has always hung me up is that the bat is not perpendicular to the rear forearm at contact. How, when and what starts the transition away from rotation around the rear forearm to the bat path into the ball? Not sure if that makes sense. What are the next two frames in your last two GIFS.

    Thanks

    Leave a comment:

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