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Bobby Tewksbary: Hitting Guru

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mudvnine View Post
    Some very good points here Skip. Because I sometimes get the feeling that a lot of the "online hitting instruction theory" is largely developed from behind a computer screen looking at ultra slo-mo video of the pros, that is never tested in the cages or on the fields with actually players before the "Post" button is pushed, and a new marketing guru is created.
    Right but one thing is that many, probably most, of the facility instructors are not seeing their clients hit on the field much, if at all. Not seeing them hit against game pitching...That doesn't mean that these instructors can't do a fine job but it is an odd dynamic. Of course, they'll say they can "tell" what the "issues" are by watching them and using the hittrax, zepps, video, whatever which, to me, is a little suspect. But it's the way things are done and it's the way money is made.
    Major Figure

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    • #17
      Originally posted by omg View Post

      Right but one thing is that many, probably most, of the facility instructors are not seeing their clients hit on the field much, if at all. Not seeing them hit against game pitching...That doesn't mean that these instructors can't do a fine job but it is an odd dynamic. Of course, they'll say they can "tell" what the "issues" are by watching them and using the hittrax, zepps, video, whatever which, to me, is a little suspect. But it's the way things are done and it's the way money is made.
      There are a few kids on my daughter's softball team who send game video to their instructors but it isn't the majority for sure.

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      • #18
        I have read a lot of Tewk's material over the years and personally believe he has some good stuff. I have also sent him some video of DD's swing as a second set of eyes, and he offered some suggestions that were helpful. But as others have stated, it may not be a "one type fits all" type thing. My personal opinion is that teaching requires the ability to assess a student's level of understanding and connect with them in a way that they understand and can implement. I really don't care if this is hitting a baseball or solving a math problem. Sometimes the smartest people with the most knowledge simply are not capable of teaching basic math to a 5 year old. Or sometimes a teacher with 25 students has success teaching 23 of them, but struggles with the other two (for various reasons). My belief on many "on-line gurus" is that they may have a decent understanding of certain things (this is debatable) based on the video they watch. But that does not mean that they know the first thing about teaching mechanics to a young hitter. Knowing and teaching are simply not the same thing.

        In regards to the comment... My belief is that hitting a baseball has a lot more involved than just mechanics. Hand-eye coordination, athleticism, mentality, and several other things. It is quite possible for someone with decent mechanics to struggle against live pitching. It is also possible for someone with poor mechanics to hold their own against live pitching (at least lower level live pitching). The truly great hitters check all the boxes. 99.99% of baseball players could work 16 hours per day and still not match Mike Trout's results.
        "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

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        • #19
          It's been some time ago, but I used to watch Tewksbary's videos that were on YouTube. My take is that he is probably a better instructor in person rather than through his online videos,

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          • #20
            Originally posted by omg View Post

            Right but one thing is that many, probably most, of the facility instructors are not seeing their clients hit on the field much, if at all. Not seeing them hit against game pitching...That doesn't mean that these instructors can't do a fine job but it is an odd dynamic. Of course, they'll say they can "tell" what the "issues" are by watching them and using the hittrax, zepps, video, whatever which, to me, is a little suspect. But it's the way things are done and it's the way money is made.
            This is one of the reasons why I try to go see as many of my players as possible actually playing games.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by pattar View Post

              There are a few kids on my daughter's softball team who send game video to their instructors but it isn't the majority for sure.
              Right, it's unreasonable to think that facility hitting gurus would be able to get out and see their multitude of clients hit and only Jettsixty could afford it. So in game video has some value. I'd prefer complete at bats form an angle directly behind the plate or from cf.

              But nothing comes close to actually being there. I am unable, unlike many here on the forum, to detect a hitting flaw say, on frame 4 of a hitter's swing even with super-slo mo, high definition video. A man has to know his limitations regarding mechanical substrate.

              I can tell you with the naked eye, in real time, during a game, whether a hitter has a micro-smidgeon of fear in their swing. Most intramural athlete-hitters do, regularly, and when they exhibit it their swing is done. Most "flaws" in intramural athlete-hitters are connected to fear, about 90%. These aren't exhibited with tee work and front toss.
              Major Figure

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              • #22
                Originally posted by omg View Post
                I can tell you with the naked eye, in real time, during a game, whether a hitter has a micro-smidgeon of fear in their swing. Most intramural athlete-hitters do, regularly, and when they exhibit it their swing is done. Most "flaws" in intramural athlete-hitters are connected to fear, about 90%. These aren't exhibited with tee work and front toss.
                please elaborate

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by omg View Post

                  I can tell you with the naked eye, in real time, during a game, whether a hitter has a micro-smidgeon of fear in their swing. Most intramural athlete-hitters do, regularly, and when they exhibit it their swing is done. Most "flaws" in intramural athlete-hitters are connected to fear, about 90%. These aren't exhibited with tee work and front toss.
                  Fear of the pitch? Like stepping out? Or fear of swinging with intent?

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                  • #24
                    Just to chime in, I typically watch the team I coach by watching the game and record their at bats and giving them tips to sit on certain things they might be missing.

                    The naked eye will likely tell me their thought process, right down to adjustments, if any and what they were sitting on

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                    • #25
                      .......................
                      Last edited by skipper5; 10-22-2019, 04:37 AM.
                      Skip

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by bluedawg View Post

                        please elaborate
                        This has to be one of the most obvious "gets" to me. Could be the front foot (slight), could be the butt, could be the front shoulder, or it could even be a delayed reaction to a pitch. The fear is most often demonstrated in a "take" i.e., when the batter does not swing. A good take will have the front shoulder, head, and eyes following the pitch close to where the action is. If, for example, a batter takes an inside pitch, not one that would hit him but one just off the plate, by jumping back with two feet- that is fear. Same on a breaking pitch that ends up being a strike.

                        It's movement away from the action, movement leaving the scene.
                        Major Figure

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by omg View Post

                          Right, it's unreasonable to think that facility hitting gurus would be able to get out and see their multitude of clients hit and only Jettsixty could afford it. So in game video has some value. I'd prefer complete at bats form an angle directly behind the plate or from cf.

                          But nothing comes close to actually being there. I am unable, unlike many here on the forum, to detect a hitting flaw say, on frame 4 of a hitter's swing even with super-slo mo, high definition video. A man has to know his limitations regarding mechanical substrate.

                          I can tell you with the naked eye, in real time, during a game, whether a hitter has a micro-smidgeon of fear in their swing. Most intramural athlete-hitters do, regularly, and when they exhibit it their swing is done. Most "flaws" in intramural athlete-hitters are connected to fear, about 90%. These aren't exhibited with tee work and front toss.
                          The use of the phrase Intramural athlete made me laugh..Did you mean amateur or are you talking about the organized activities in college full of frat boys who tell the sorority girls they were good enough to play D1 but wanted to concentrate on their studies despite the fact that they are talking to these girls half drunk at a bar on a Wed. night?
                          Last edited by pattar; 10-22-2019, 06:22 AM.

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                          • #28
                            Last year, when our 9-hitter began the season 0-for-22, I realized that he almost always started out behind in the count because pitchers were starting him off with quality strikes away, often low and away. It was a random period of inexplicable, bizarre bad luck.

                            I wonder if he went to his hitting instructor for mechanical adjustments to cure his "slump"?

                            Just reiterating my point that it's impossible for instructors to have their boots on the ground at the games in order to see what's really going on.
                            Skip

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by pattar View Post

                              The use of the phrase Intramural athlete made me laugh..Did you mean amateur or are you talking about the organized activities in college full of frat boys who tell the sorority girls they were good enough to play D1 but wanted to concentrate on their studies despite the fact that they are talking to these girls half drunk at a bar on a Wed. night?
                              Good one, it's all of the above. We all intramural athletes.
                              Major Figure

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by syidewayz View Post

                                Fear of the pitch? Like stepping out? Or fear of swinging with intent?
                                Both. They go hand in hand.
                                Major Figure

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